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Results for search "Neurology".

15 Feb

Children Exposed to ADHD Meds During Pregnancy Are Not at Increased Risk for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Study Finds

Taking ADHD medication during pregnancy does not raise the odds of ADHD, autism, or other neurodevelopmental disorders in children, according to researchers.

20 Jul

When Mom is BRCA+, Should the Kids Be Told?

Teens and young adults adapt well to family genetic information, reporting relatively low psychological stress, researchers say.

Health News Results - 504

Scientists Pinpoint Brain Area Needed for Vision-Guided Walking

A new study hones in on what part of your brain controls walking.

Researchers discovered that two main regions of the cortex were activated as people moved in various ways through an environment. But the occipital place area (OPA) didn’t activate during crawling, while the second region, the retrosplenial complex (RSC), did.

RSC supports map-based navigation, according to the rese...

Exercise Does Help People With Parkinson's Disease, Review Finds

Exercise can help improve movement-related symptoms for people who have Parkinson’s disease, a new review finds.

And any type of structured exercise is better than none, researchers added. The findings were published recently in the Cochrane Reviews.

Walking & Talking at Same Time: Aging Brain May Make It Tougher

Problems walking and talking or thinking at the same time might be a warning sign of impending dementia, a new study suggests.

Being unable to juggle two tasks simultaneously has been recognized as a sign of mental (or "cognitive") decline after age 65, but this research shows that the ability actually starts to fall off in middle-age. The finding could spur calls for earlier screening, r...

Your Body Clock Knows When It's Time for Dinner: Study

Do you ever wonder why you typically feel hungry when it’s time for dinner?

Researchers say that’s not just a habit, but a physiological drive, with the human body able to predict the timing of regular meals.

“We often get hungry around the same time every day, but the extent to which our biology can anticipate mealtimes is unknown. It is possible that metabolic rhythms align ...

Could COVID Trigger 'Face Blindness'?

The list of symptoms that can strike long COVID sufferers has just gotten a little longer, and a little more mysterious: Researchers are reporting a case of "face blindness" related to the syndrome.

The condition, known medically as prosopagnosia, causes a very specific impairment: trouble discerning one face from another. Even the once-familiar face of a loved one might as well be a stra...

Diabetes, Tooth Loss Can Be Double Trouble for Aging Brains

Diabetes is a known risk factor for mental decline and dementia. Paired with total tooth loss, the potential harm to the brain is even more significant, new research indicates.

The findings highlight the importance of good dental care and diabetes control in aging adults, said

Two Healthy Diets May Reduce Brain 'Plaques' Tied to Alzheimer's Risk

Elderly adults who eat plenty of leafy green vegetables, fish and other healthy fare may take years off their "brain age," a new study suggests.

Researchers found that seniors with either of two healthy eating patterns -- the Mediterranean and MIND diets -- showed fewer brain "plaques," abnormal protein clumps that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

In fact, people with the high...

Long COVID Patients Show Lower Levels of Brain Oxygen

People who have long COVID — lingering symptoms after a COVID-19 infection — may also have lower brain oxygen levels, cognitive problems and psychiatric troubles, such as anxiety and depression.

Researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada and Drexel University in Philadelphia combined

Could the Mediterranean Diet Help People With MS?

A Mediterranean diet may help multiple sclerosis (MS) patients ward off damage to their thinking skills.

New research finds that a diet rich in veggies, fruit, fish and healthy fat reduced their risk of developing memory loss as well as losing the ability to concentrate, learn new things or make decisions.

A loss of such key mental skills, or “cognitive impairment,” is a common ...

Spinal Cord Stimulation May Ease Diabetic Neuropathy

Electrical stimulation from a spinal cord implant can provide long-lasting relief for people with diabetic neuropathy, updated clinical trial results show.

“Two years after starting with using that stimulator device, they're still having the same quality of improvement as what we first saw,” said lead researcher

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 1, 2023
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  • Take These 7 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    If it’s good for your heart, it’s good for your brain, too.

    This is the main message from a new study showing that seven heart-healthy habits can lower your chances of developing dementia down the road. This list includes being active, eating better, maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking, having healthy blood pressure, controlling cholesterol, and keeping blood sugar (or "glucose"...

    Unraveling the Link Between Menstrual Cycles and Migraine

    Many women experience blinding migraine headaches around their monthly period, and now researchers have a clue about why.

    Levels of the female hormone estrogen fluctuate during menstruation, which may lead to increases in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). This protein widens blood vessels in the brain, which is part of the cascade of events that cause migraines.

    “Women with ...

    Air Pollution May Create U.S. 'Hot Spots' for Parkinson's Risk

    People living in heavily polluted areas of the United States may be more vulnerable to Parkinson’s disease, a new study suggests.

    Specifically, the culprit is a type of air pollution called fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which is less than 2.5 microns in diameter and comes from car exhaust, burning of fuels in power plants and other industries, and forest and grass fires, researchers...

    Scientists Grow Electrodes in Living Tissue

    Swedish scientists say they have grown electrodes in living tissue, paving the way for formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.

    The development, which blurs the lines between biology and technology, could one day lead to therapies for neurological disorders.

    “For several decades, we have tried to create electronics that mimic biology. Now we let biolo...

    Noninvasive Ultrasound Brain Treatment Might Help Slow Parkinson's

    A noninvasive treatment that heats specific areas of brain tissue may ease movement symptoms in some people with Parkinson's disease, a clinical trial has found.

    The study tested the effects of an incision-free procedure called focused ultrasound ablation, where doctors use sound waves to heat and destroy sp...

    Exercise Just Once a Month Could Help Your Brain Decades Later

    Regular exercise at some point in life is a key to better cognitive health in old age, researchers say. Starting sooner is better and sustaining it longer are, too.

    A new British study has found that exercising at least once a month at any time in adulthood is linked to better ...

    Even Mild COVID Might Change Your Brain

    People who are experiencing anxiety and depression months after a mild case of COVID-19 may have changes affecting the structure and function of their brains, Brazilian researchers report.

    “There is still much to learn about long COVID, which includes a wide range of health problems, including anxiety and depression, months after infection,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2023
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  • Spinal Cord Stimulation Gives Big Boost to Arm Function After Stroke

    It’s a brutal reality that confronts many recovering stroke patients: After six months or so of rehab, any arm and hand movement not yet restored is unlikely to return.

    But new cutting-edge research aims to use electrical stimulation to jumpstart stroke-interrupted communication be...

    Parkinson's Disease: What Is It, and What Are the Early Signs?

    A person seeing a barely noticeable tremor in one hand could be witnessing the first signs of Parkinson’s disease.

    This progressive condition affects the nervous system, according to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., which offers information about the disease.

    While tremors are common, Parkinson’s can also cause stiffness or slow movement.

    Medications can significantly ...

    Bruce Willis Diagnosed With Frontotemporal Dementia

    FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Actor Bruce Willis’ health issues have worsened, his family announced Thursday, revealing that he has now been diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia.

    The condition typically starts between the ages of 45 and 65 and is the most common form of deme...

    'Top Gun' Study of Fighter Pilots Could Help Astronauts

    A new study finds brain changes in F16 fighter pilots, which could shed light on what happens to astronauts during space travel.

    The hope is that the study, published Feb. 15 in Frontiers in Physiology, will help scientists understand the effects of space flight on the brain, possib...

    Young Kids, Adults Use Same Brain Areas to Solve Tough Problems

    Adults use a special part of their brain to solve tough problems. Now, new research shows that kids do the same.

    Scientists used brain scans and challenging work to assess how kids and adults might work through these tough problems and whether or not their problem-solving processes were the same.

    Turns out they were.

    The researchers found that while the multiple demand network...

    'Neuroprotectant' Drug Could Boost Outcomes After a Stroke

    Using a "neuroprotectant" drug alongside the standard surgical removal of a clot may slash the risk of death and disability following a stroke, a new study finds.

    The new medication, called ApTOLL, shields brain tissue from continuing damage by cooling down inflammation, the researchers said.

    A stroke occurs when blood supply to part of the brain is blocked by a clot or when a ...

    In Autopsy Study, Over 90% of Former NFL Players Showed Signs of Brain Disease CTE

    Many football fans fondly remember Rick Arrington as the Philadelphia Eagles' quarterback from 1970 to 1973, but his daughter’s memories are tainted by years spent watching her dad suffer from late-stage chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

    A degenerative brain disease found in athletes, military veterans and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma, CTE causes depression, su...

    How Are Toxins Like Lead, Arsenic Getting Into Baby Foods?

    Parents in the United States may assume baby food is free of impurities, but a recent research review highlights the much different reality: Most foods made for babies and toddlers have some amount of toxic heavy metals.

    The contaminants include metals, such as lead and arsenic, that can harm brain development, and contribute to learning and behavior problems in children. And they are fou...

    Live Near Busy Traffic? You May Be at Higher Odds for Tinnitus

    People who live near traffic noise, especially when it continues at night, are more likely to develop the repetitive whistling or buzzing sounds in their ears known as tinnitus.

    Danish researchers found a link between the risk of developing the condition and traffic noise, with a vicious cycle of stress reactions and sleep disturbance as a potential cause.

    Living near a busy road m...

    Caring for Teeth, Gums May Safeguard Aging Brains

    Taking good care of your teeth -- brushing, flossing, regular dental checkups -- is, of course, important for good health. Now researchers say it's also vital for brain health.

    While it was already clear that poor dental health could increase stroke and heart disease risk, a new study funds that adults who are genetically prone to have cavities, dentures and missing teeth are also more li...

    Stuck in Traffic? Diesel Fumes May Be Harming Your Brain

    If you find yourself stuck in a traffic jam and you start to feel fuzzy-headed, the diesel exhaust from the truck in front of you might be to blame.

    New research found that just two hours of exposure to diesel exhaust impaired the brain’s functional connectivity, which can lower your ability to think and remember.

    "We compared people after diesel exhaust exposure compared to filt...

    Heart Disease When Young Could Bring Memory Issues by Middle Age

    People who suffer a heart attack or stroke in middle age may develop memory and thinking problems earlier in life, too, a new study finds.

    The study, published online Jan. 25 in the journal Neurology, focused on people who had developed premature cardiovascular disease. That refers...

    Initial Symptoms Could Predict How Fast Alzheimer's Progresses

    Memory loss is the most common symptom associated with Alzheimer’s disease — the terrifying prospect of slowly forgetting yourself and everything around you.

    But people who exhibit memory loss early on in their dementia actually have a slower rate of decline than those who develop other symptoms earlier, a

    Preterm Birth Tied to Lower IQs, Poorer School Grades

    By the time they're teenagers, babies born prematurely may be getting poorer school grades than their non-preemie peers.

    Researchers found that babies born before 34 weeks of pregnancy had lower scores on math and language tests during their teen years compared to kids born at 40 weeks.

    However, the study did not find a significant difference in later brain function in babies born b...

    Some Athletes May Need an Extra Month for Concussion Recovery

    Some college athletes take longer to recover from a concussion, but a new study offers them some good news.

    They may still be able to return to play -- after one extra month of recovery, researchers report Jan. 18 in the journal Neurology.

    "Although an athlete may experience a slow or delayed recovery, there is reason to believe recovery is achievable with additional time ...

    Could Gut Bacteria Help Spur Parkinson's Disease?

    A recent study suggests that Parkinson's disease, in which parts of the brain are progressively damaged over many years, may actually start in the gut.

    Nearly 30% of the gut bacteria in patients with Parkinson's disease differed from those without the disease, according to the study ...

    Black, Hispanic People With Epilepsy Often Miss Out on Latest Meds

    American adults who have epilepsy and are Black or Hispanic are less likely than white adults to be prescribed the latest medications, according to new research.

    “While finding the right medication is often a trial-and-error process that is based on the individual, studies have shown that use of newer medications improves outcomes, and some newer medications have fewer side effects,” ...

    Could 6 Minutes of Exercise Help Shield Your Brain From Alzheimer's?

    Six minutes of high-intensity exercise might prolong the lifespan of a healthy brain, perhaps delaying the start of Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s diseases, a new, small study suggests.

    Researchers found that short but intense cycling increased the production of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is essential for brain formation, learning and memory. It's tho...

    FDA Approves Second Alzheimer’s Drug, Despite Safety Concerns

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a second Alzheimer's drug, lecanemab, despite reports of rare brain bleeds linked to use of the drug in some patients.

    However, the FDA pointed to the drug's benefits, as well.

    “Alzheimer’s disease immeasurably incapacitates the lives of those who suffer from it and has devastating effects on their loved ones,” Dr. Bill...

    Patients, Doctors Await FDA Decision on Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug

    Lecanemab: It's an experimental medication that's been shown in trials to slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s disease.

    It's also up for accelerated approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with a decision expected by Jan. 6.

    However, the drug has also been linked to two deaths from brain bleeds among people who’ve used it in trials, so safety concerns c...

    Frequent Social Media Checks May Affect Young Brains

    Social media's impact on young people is a hot topic, with most kids and teens wanting to do whatever their friends are doing and parents worrying about setting limits.

    A new study examines whether frequent checking of social media sites (Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat) is associated with changes in functional brain development in these early adolescents, about age 12.

    Using brain...

    COVID Vaccine Is Safe for Kids Who Got Rare Complication of COVID Illness

    It's safe for kids to take the COVID-19 vaccine after they’ve suffered a rare complication from a prior COVID infection, a U.S. National Institutes of Health-supported study has concluded.

    Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) affects about 1 in every 3,000 to 4,000 kids who contract COVID-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The co...

    Newborns' 'Random' Body Movements Are Helping Them Learn

    Those seemingly random kicks or wiggles a newborn baby makes have a purpose.

    With each movement, the baby is developing its sensorimotor system, which it will later use to perform sequential movements. The sensorimotor system lets a person control muscles, movement and coordination.

    Researchers studying these “spontaneous” newborn movements and comparing them to babies a few mon...

    Time Spent in Nature Appears to Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's

    Living in an area with easy access to parks and rivers appears to slow the progression of devastating neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

    That's the conclusion of a new study based on more than a decade and a half tracking disease risk among ...

    Science Reveals Cause of Smell Loss in COVID-19

    One of the hallmarks of a COVID-19 infection has been a lost sense of smell after the infection ends.

    In a new study, researchers blame an ongoing immune assault on the olfactory nerve cells — cells found at the top of the nasal cavity — and a decline in the number of those cells. The study was led by a team at Duke Health in Durham, N.C.

    “One of the first symptoms that has ty...

    Smokers More Prone to Memory Loss by Middle Age

    If you need another reason to quit smoking, researchers have one: your mid-life brain health.

    Not only does smoking harm lung and heart health, but it increases the chances of middle-aged memory loss and confusion, a new study shows.

    The likelihood of mental ("cognitive") decline is lower for those who quit — even if they did so only recently, according to researchers at Ohio Sta...

    Hints That Deep Brain Stimulation Might Ease Alzheimer's Symptoms

    Researchers are studying whether deep brain stimulation could help people with Alzheimer's hold on to their memory longer, and now a new finding may help refine the approach.

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for several medical conditions, including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It involves implanting electrodes in certain areas o...

    Stranded Dolphins' Brains Show Alzheimer's-Like Changes

    Groups of whales, dolphins and porpoises are regularly stranded in shallow waters around the coasts of the United Kingdom.

    Researchers wanted to understand why, so they studied the brains of 22 toothed whales — or "odontocetes" — that were stranded in Scottish coastal waters.

    The study includ...

    Americans' Odds for Parkinson's May Be Higher Than Thought

    Parkinson's disease is a much bigger problem than previously thought, particularly for aging Americans, a new study finds.

    There are about 50% more new cases of the degenerative disorder diagnosed each year in North America than currently estimated, researchers concluded after an extensive data review.

    "We used to say 60,000 people a year were getting diagnosed, but really it's 90,0...

    Cluster Headaches Often Joined by Other Illnesses

    Having short, painful headaches for many days or even weeks in a row may signal that you're more likely to have other medical woes, researchers say.

    These "cluster headaches" are extremely painful and can last from 15 minutes to three hours at a time. And people who have them may be more than three times more likely to have other medical conditions, such as heart disease or mental disorde...

    Patients' Genes Raise Odds for Rare Brain Infection When Using Certain Meds

    For some people, dozens of U.S.-approved drugs can lead to a rare but often fatal brain infection.

    Researchers have now confirmed a strong link between four genetic mutations and this illness, called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

    A new study found that in people ta...

    What Is Stiff-Person Syndrome, the Illness Afflicting Celine Dion?

    Stiff-person syndrome: Superstar singer Celine Dion announced Thursday that she is living with this rare neurological condition and has canceled and postponed tour dates to deal with her health issues.

    "Recently, I've been diagnosed with a very rare neurological disorder called the stiff-person syndrome, which affects something like one in a million people," Dion, 54, said on

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 9, 2022
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  • Your Dog's Behavior Is in Its DNA

    Is your pooch a herder or a hunter? You can try taking them to a trainer, but new research shows much of their behavior is hardwired in their DNA.

    For the new study, researchers analyzed DNA samples from more than 200 dog breeds and surveyed 46,000 pet-owners to try to suss out why certain breeds act the way they do.

    “The largest, most successful genetic experiment that humans hav...

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