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Results for search "Anxiety".

Health News Results - 363

Perceptive Pooches Can Smell Your Stress

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows dogs have a keen sense of smell, but now researchers have discovered they can even smell stress in the breath and sweat of humans.

"Dogs possess an incredible sense of smell. Previous research has demonstrated their ability to ...

Anxiety During Pregnancy Could Mean Earlier Delivery

Too much anxiety isn't good for anyone, but a new study suggests it is particularly perilous for pregnant women because it can raise the chances of their child being born early.

Given that finding, the researchers recommended that doctors screen for anxiety during the...

Task Force Recommends Anxiety Screening for All Adults Under 65

In what amounts to a public acknowledgement that anxiety disorders have run rampant during the pandemic, an influential expert panel is recommending for the first time that all Amer...

Pot Use in Early Pregnancy Linked to Long-Term Mental Health Issues in Kids

Using marijuana after the first weeks of pregnancy is linked to mental health issues in children that linger well into early adolescence, a new study shows.

Exposure to cannabis after about five to six weeks of fetal development was associated with attention, social and behavioral problems, according to...

Could You Spot the Signs of Suicide Risk?

Recognizing the signs that someone is considering suicide could help save a life.

"Emergency physicians see many people who are struggling silently with their mental health," said Dr. Gillian Schmitz, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians.

"One...

Stress Before COVID Infection Could Raise Odds for Long COVID

As scientists around the world investigate why long COVID strikes some and not others, a new study finds that suffering psychological distress prior to COVID-19 infection may increase the chances of getting the lingering condition.

Resea...

Nearly 1 in 4 Young U.S. Adults Sought Mental Health Care During Pandemic

The stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic may have led to a significant jump in the number of young American adults seeking help for mental health woes, new data shows.

Between 2019 and 2021, the percentage of American adults overall who said they'd sought and received any mental health treatment over the ...

Oral Surgery on Your Calendar? Expert Offers Tips to Ease Anxiety

If you're planning to have oral surgery, be prepared, not scared, an expert suggests — and stay off YouTube.

“I tell all of my patients, ‘The more you know, the better it's going to be.' As health professionals, we're not trying to scare patients with information; it's just that when you're prepared for something, when you know what's going to happen, it reduces the anxiety level, a...

'Digital Self-Harm': When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

Up to 9% of American teens say they've engaged in what's known as "digital self-harm" -- anonymously posting negative comments about themselves on social media.

As is the case with acts of physical self-harm such as cutting, this "virtual" self-harm is associated with a higher risk for thinking about or attempting suicide, according to a startling

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 2, 2022
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  • 'News Addiction' Is Common and Can Harm Your Mental Health

    From the COVID-19 pandemic and the spread of monkeypox to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, school shootings and devastating wildfires, there's been no lack of doom and gloom lately, and many folks are glued to the news.

    For more than 16% of people, however, compulsive news watching can be seriously problematic and is linked to a host of physical and

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 24, 2022
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  • Breakfast Might Be Good for a Child's Emotional Health, Too

    What your kids eat for breakfast and where they eat it could matter for their social and emotional health.

    That's the upshot of a new nationwide study from Spain that concluded that eating breakfast away from home was almost as detrimental as skipping the meal altogether. Researchers said thi...

    Pregnancy Can Be Anxious Time for Women With Epilepsy

    Pregnant women with epilepsy battle anxiety and depression more often than their peers who aren't pregnant or don't have epilepsy, a new study reveals.

    "The good news is we did not find that pregnant women with epilepsy were any more likely to have episodes of major depression than the other two groups," said st...

    Too Few Psychiatric Beds: Psychiatrists' Group Takes Aim at Ongoing Crisis

    Amid a stark shortage of psychiatric beds that only worsened for millions suffering from mental illnesses during the pandemic, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is rolling out a new model that can help communities determine exactly how many beds they need.

    Having enough in-patient beds would cut down on overcrowding in emergency departments and early release from needed care, th...

    Veterans Often Reluctant to Admit Struggles With Sleep, Addictions

    A new study of U.S. military veterans reveals they are more comfortable getting help for physical ills than for mental health issues.

    "The majority of participants indicated they would be willing to seek treatment for both physical and mental health problems. However, they reported significantly greater willingness to seek treatment for physical than mental health conditions," said princi...

    Unpaid Time Off Work Rose 50% During Pandemic

    U.S. workers without paid leave lost out on an estimated $28 billion in wages during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report.

    The analysis showed that the greatest increases in unpaid absences were among low-income workers who were self-employed,...

    Fewer Smokers Tried to Quit During COVID Pandemic

    Fewer people tried to quit smoking as the COVID-19 pandemic began, and this continued for at least a year, according to a new U.S. study.

    The American Cancer Society detailed pandemic smoking behavior in the report, while stressing the need to re-engage smokers in

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 8, 2022
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  • Loneliness Can Be a Real Heartbreaker, Cardiac Experts Warn

    Social isolation and loneliness put people at a 30% higher risk of heart attack, stroke or death from either, a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    The statement also highlights the lack of data on interventions that could improve heart health in isolated or lonely people. It was published Aug. 4 in the

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 5, 2022
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  • Mental Health Issues Can Plague Families of Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

    Kids with type 1 diabetes and their closest relatives are more likely to experience mental health issues than people without the disease, Swedish researchers report.

    “Many clinicians assume intuitively that diabetes in a child negatively affects the mental health of both the patient and the family members,” said study co-author Agnieszka Butwicka, an assistant professor at the Karolin...

    There's Stress, and Then There's 'Good Stress'

    A tight deadline at work. A tough exam at school. A big vacation that requires tons of planning. A home repair that's gone awry.

    These sources of stress are anything but pleasant, but a new study suggests that they might actually be good f...

    Work Worries Keep Lots of Americans Awake Sunday Nights

    Don't be afraid of Sunday night.

    Good sleep habits can ward off the so-called “Sunday scaries” — the worry about returning to work on Monday morning that keeps many folks tossing and turning on Sunday night.

    A recent American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 1, 2022
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  • 8/9 -- Study Casts Doubt on 'Chemical Imbalance' Theory of Depression

    The notion that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain has become widespread among the general public.

    But there's actually no hard evidence that the brain chemical

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Panting Pooches: When Summer Heat Is Too Much for Your Dog

    Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with your dog, but when the temperatures spike or the fireworks come out, it's time to make sure your furry best friend is having just as good a time as you are.

    When a heat wave rolls in, try to only take your dog for walks in the coolest hours of the day, advised Mark Fr...

    U.K. School Studies Find No Benefit of Mindfulness for Kids' Mental Health

    As rates of teenage anxiety and depression climb in the United States, parents and teachers are rushing to solve the mental health crisis.

    Some have proposed mindfulness training in schools as a therapeutic tool, but a review of studies out of the United Kingdom indicates it may be time to consid...

    Can Anxiety Disorders Pass From Parent to Child?

    From the ongoing pandemic and the monkeypox outbreak to the charged political landscape, New York City mom and entrepreneur Lyss Stern has been increasingly anxious.

    Stern worries that she will pass all of this fretting down to her 8-year-old daughter, and a new study suggests she just might.

    "Children may be more likely to learn anxious behavior if it is being displayed by their s...

    Inflation Has Americans' Anxiety Levels Surging: Poll

    Nearly all Americans are worried about inflation as economic worries oust COVID-19 as the nation's top source of stress, a new poll reveals.

    Nearly nine out of 10 Americans (87%) said they are anxious or very anxious about inflation, up 8 percentage points from the previous month, according to...

    How Childhood Abuse Can Haunt the Senior Years

    Poor mental and physical health among older adults may trace back to childhood abuse, a Canadian study suggests.

    The study, published online July 7 in the journal Aging and Health Research, found that people who were physically abused during childhood were twice as likely ...

    Muting Your Phone May Cause More Stress, Not Less

    Are you plagued by FOMO -- "fear of missing out"? Then silencing your smartphone may not be the stress-buster you think it is.

    That's the takeaway from a new study that found many folks check their phones a lot more when they're set to mute or vibrate than when they beep and ring.

    "Without any clear 'buzz' or sou...

    Youth Suicide Attempts Drop in U.S. States With Hate Crime Laws

    Hate crime laws that protect gay, lesbian and transgender people may have an unexpected benefit: fewer teen suicide attempts, among kids of all sexual orientations.

    That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at what happened in U.S. states that enacted hate crime laws with protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning individuals. It found that

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 23, 2022
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  • Pets Help Their Humans De-Stress, Stay Fit: Survey

    While chronic stress is a key risk factor for heart disease and stroke, most cat and dog owners say pets help them chill out and stay active.

    A new American Heart Association (AHA) survey of 1,000 pet owners found 95% relying on their animal companions for stress relief. About 7 in 10 said they'd rather spend time with their pet than watch television, and nearly half (47%) said their pets...

    Obamacare May Have Helped Lower Suicide Rates

    Suicide rates are rising more slowly in states that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new study finds.

    "Suicide is a public health problem, and our findings indicate that increasing access to health care -- including mental health care -- by expanding Medicaid eligibility can play an imp...

    Stress Can Age, Weaken Your Immune System

    Stress may take a huge toll on your health, weakening your immune system and opening the door to serious illness, a new study suggests.

    Traumatic events, job strain, daily stressors and discrimination may all speed aging of the

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 14, 2022
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  • The 988 Mental Health Hotline Is Coming. Is America Ready?

    The mental health equivalent of 911 is about to launch across the United States, but a new study finds that many communities may not be prepared for it.

    Beginning July 16, a new 988 number will be available 24/7 for Americans dealing with a mental health crisis

    4 in 10 U.S. Adults Who Need Mental Health Care Can't Get It: Survey

    There is a "staggering" gap between the number of Americans who need care for anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions and those who can actually get it, a new survey shows.

    In all, 42% of U.S. adults who needed care in the previous 12 months did not get it because of costs and other barriers, according to the online survey from the National Council for Mental Wellbeing. Nea...

    COVID Might Raise Odds for Psychiatric Disorders Later: Study

    People who've been through a bout of COVID may be more vulnerable to mental health disorders in the months following their infection, a new study warns.

    Researchers analyzed data on more than 46,000 people in the United States who tested positive for COVID-19 and an equal number of people with other types of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 8, 2022
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  • Intentional Overdoses Rise Among U.S. Kids, Teens

    A growing number of U.S. kids are attempting suicide by medication overdose - with the biggest increase seen among preteens, a recent study shows.

    Researchers found that between 2015 and 2020, there was a 27% increase in overdose suicide or attempted suicide among U.S. children and teenagers. While teens accounted for most of those incidents, it was 10- to 12-year-olds who showed the bigg...

    Team Sports: Good for Kids' Minds, Too

    Kids who play team sports may win some mental health benefits, but the same may not hold true for those in solo sports, a large, new study suggests.

    A number of previous studies have linked team sports to better mental well-being for children and teenagers, and the new...

    Pandemic Has U.S. Hospitals Overwhelmed With Teens in Mental Crisis

    The COVID-19 pandemic and the isolation it imposed took a dramatic toll on kids' mental health, increasing the demand for services in an already overburdened system.

    As a result, many kids found themselves being "boarded" in emergency departments as they awaited care, according to a new study conducted at Boston Children's Hospital. The average wait was nearly five days without specialize...

    A Lover's Embrace May Calm Women More Than Men

    Is an upcoming final exam or big-time job interview stressing you out?

    Hug your honey.

    That's the takeaway from new research that showed how embracing your significant other can help calm women.

    But sorry, guys, the same isn't true for you, according to the study published May 18 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    "As a woman, hugging your romantic partner can prevent t...

    Various Mental Illnesses Share Same Genes: Study

    Many people who get a diagnosis for one mental illness may find they have additional psychiatric conditions, and new genetic research offers an explanation why.

    A number of mental illnesses share genetic similarities, researchers found. This discovery helps explain why multiple conditions are common among people with psychiatric disorders, the investigators pointed out in a new study.

    ...

    Depression, Anxiety Hit Minorities Hardest During Pandemic

    Americans' rates of depression and anxiety spiked during the first year of the pandemic, but the increases were much more pronounced among Black, Hispanic and Asian people than among white people, new research shows.

    From April 2020 to April 2021, the overall incidence of depression or

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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  • Week Off Social Media Boosts Mental Health: Study

    It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • It's Getting Tougher to Find Spanish-Language Mental Health Services in U.S.

    Mental health has become a hot topic during the pandemic, but some groups have been burdened by having too few services available even before the challenges of these past two years.

    A new study found that while the Hispanic population in the United States grew by almost 5% between 2014 and 2019, Spanish-language mental health services dropped by about 18% during that same time.

    "

    Kids Who Witness Domestic Violence May Suffer Mentally for Decades

    Witnessing violence between your parents is traumatic when it happens, but a new study finds that trauma can raise your risk of depression and other mental health problems.

    The study included more than 17,700 Canadian adults who took part in a national survey on mental health. Of those respondents, 326 sa...

    Poor Sleep Linked to More Mood Disorders During Pandemic

    Having trouble getting your shut-eye during the COVID-19 pandemic?

    You may be at increased risk for anxiety, depression and other mental health struggles.

    That's the key takeaway from an analysis of data collected from nearly 5,000 people who wore a digital sleep device before and...

    As Pandemic Continues, Advice for Parents on How to Manage Anxiety in Kids

    Anxiety over the COVID-19 pandemic is common among young children, and parents may wonder how to quell those concerns.

    An expert from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston has some advice.

    "Parents should have a clear idea of what their thoughts are about the virus and get on the same page as their partner," said Laurel Williams, a professor in the department of psychiatry and behav...

    When Pot Is Legal, Prescriptions for Pain, Depression, Anxiety and Sleep Drop: Study

    When people have legal access to marijuana, they're less likely to take certain prescription drugs, new research suggests.

    U.S. states where recreational marijuana is legal have seen large drops in the use of prescription drugs for pain, depression, anxiety, sleep, psychosis and seizures, the researchers found.

    "These results have important implications," said study co-author Shyam ...

    Mental Illness Linked to Higher Risk of Deadly Heart Issues

    People with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses are at increased risk of death from heart problems, a large research review finds.

    "Our systematic review and meta-analysis of over 100 studies has confirmed a strong association between severe mental illness and cardiovascular disease which became stronger in the 1990s and 2000s," said study author Amanda Lambe...

    Mental Health Issues Linked to Higher Risk of Breakthrough COVID Infections

    People with substance abuse disorders, depression and other mental health conditions may be at higher risk for COVID-19 -- even when they are fully vaccinated, new research suggests.

    "Individuals with psychiatric disorders, and especially older adults with psychiatric disorders, may be particularly vulnerable to breakthrough infections," said study author Kristen Nishimi, a postdoctoral f...

    Your Personality May Safeguard Your Aging Brain

    Certain personality traits may make older adults more or less vulnerable to waning memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 2,000 older adults, found that those high on the "conscientious" scale - organized, self-disciplined and productive - were less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment. That refers to subtler problems with memory and other mental ski...

    Hospital Work During Pandemic Was Like a War Zone: Study

    Health care workers battling the pandemic may be suffering moral traumas at a rate similar to soldiers in a war zone, a new study suggests.

    The pandemic has brought a stream of stories about overtaxed health care workers, facing repeated COVID surges, resource shortages and public resistance to the vaccines that can keep people out of the hospital. Workers' distress is often called burnou...

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