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Results for search "Anxiety".

05 Sep

Climate Anxiety Is Real and It’s Impacting Both Kids and Adults

Dr. Christopher Lemon from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine offers parents advice on how to help kids who are feeling anxious about climate change, the environment, and their health.

07 Aug

Depression and Anxiety Do Not Raise Overall Cancer Risk, Study Finds

Researchers find no link between depression, anxiety, and most types of cancer, including breast, prostate, and colon cancers.

17 May

Are You Wondering if You Have Social Anxiety? Here are the Signs and Treatments

Social anxiety has many signs and symptoms, but sometimes can be tricky to spot. Here is more on what signs to consider when diagnosing and exploring treatment options.

Health News Results - 567

Parents, You Can Ease a Teen's Stress Around Standardized Tests

Standardized tests put a lot of pressure on teenagers who want to secure their future and make their parents and teachers proud.

This stress can lead to symptoms like stomach aches, sleep problems, irritability and heightened emotionality, experts say.

But there are concrete steps students can take to prepare for a standardized test while also keeping their cool.

Live ...

Black and Native Americans Hit Hardest by 'Deaths of Despair'

More middle-aged Black and Native Americans are now falling prey to “deaths of despair” than whites, a new study finds.

These deaths -- from suicide, drug overdose and alcoholic liver disease -- initially had been more common among whites.

But a new analysis has determined that deaths of despair have skyrocketed for Black and Native Americans over the past decade.

The deat...

Suicide Rates Have Doubled in 20 Years Among U.S. College Athletes

Suicides among U.S. college athletes have doubled over the past two years, according to data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Suicide is now the second most common cause of death for college athletes after accidents, results show.

“Athletes are generally thought of as one of the healthiest populations in our society, yet the pressures of school, internal a...

Big Improvements Seen in Spotting, Treating Mental Health Issues Around Pregnancy

Expecting or new mothers are much more likely these days to be diagnosed with anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows.

However, more women are also getting treated for these problems rather than roughing it out, researchers report in A...

What Is 'Mindful Reading' and Can It Help Your Brain?

Ever immersed yourself in a book and lost all sense of the time and place you're currently in?

That's how reading can meld with mindfulness, one neuropsychologist explains.

The experience can bring real mental health benefits, said

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2024
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  • Stressed? Some Genes Could Raise Your Heart Attack Risk

    Folks with genetically-driven stress are more likely to suffer heart attacks after nerve-wracking events or times of unrest, a new study shows.

    People with above-average genetic scores linked to neuroticism and stress were 34% more likely to experience a heart attack followi...

    High Rate of Suicidal Thoughts Among Black Men in Rural America: Study

    Suicidal thoughts and contemplation of death haunt the minds of many rural Black men in the United States, a new study reports.

    One in three rural Black men said they had such dark thoughts within the past two weeks, University of Georgia researchers found.

    These thoughts are driven by childhood trauma, poverty and exposure to racism, all of which take a heavy toll on mental health ...

    Working-Age Americans Are Dying at Much Higher Rates Than Peers in Other Wealthy Nations

    Working stiffs in the United States are dying at higher rates than those in other wealthy nations, a new study finds.

    Death rates among working-age Americans are 2.5 times higher than the average of other high-income countries, researchers report in the March 21 issue of the International Journal of Epidem...

    Knitting Helps Keep Troubled Minds From Unraveling, Study Finds

    Stressed out, anxious or desperately needing to recharge?

    Grab some knitting needles and a pretty ball of yarn -- Swedish research shows yarncraft improves mental health without medication.

    "Knitters have a creative leisure interest that can also help them cope with life and so improve their mental health," said first author

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 21, 2024
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  • As Treatments Ease Anxiety, Heart Risks Also Decline

    People with heart disease can stay healthier if they address their emotional problems as well as their physical ailments, a new study says.

    Treating anxiety and depression reduced ER visits and hospitalizations among patients with heart disease, researchers ...

    U.S. Falls Out of Top 20 in 'World's Happiest Countries' List

    For the first time, the United States has fallen out of the top 20 spots on the annual world's happiest nations list.

    Americans are now No. 23, far behind the top five countries -- Finland (No. 1), Denmark, Iceland, Sweden and Israel. 

    "The...

    ADHD Meds Cut Odds for Early Death, Especially by Overdose

    People diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show a marked decline in their two-year risk for death once they start taking medication, new research shows.

    That was particularly true for deaths due to accidents and drug overdose.

    People taking ADHD drugs also showed no higher...

    Permissive Gun Laws Linked to Higher Suicide Rates

    When states let gun owners carry a firearm openly without a permit, death rates soar.

    Significantly more people died by firearms and suicides in states that have relaxed open carry laws, a nine-year study of death data from all 50 states shows. 

    "Our analysis suggests that because of the change in the law, which provides easier access to firearms, we saw an increased firearm su...

    Medical Costs for Kids' Mental Health Jumped 31% in 5 Years

    The cost to American families of caring for a child with a mental health condition rose by almost a third between 2017 and 2021, a new report finds, to an average $4,361 per year. 

    Overall, American families spent an estimated $31 billion in 2021 on child mental health services, which now make up nearly half (about 47%) of all child medical spending, the report found.

    The findi...

    Many Can't Access Mental Health Services that Save Money, Keep People Out of Jail

    When it comes to giving at-risk Americans access to the mental health services they need, prevention is far better than detention, new research confirms.

    However, a majority of the 950 U.S. counties surveyed in the report do not offer access to the types of mental health and substance use disorder services that can save communities money and prevent incarceration.

    "Most co...

    Some Women Escape the Mental Health Effects of Menopause: Study

    Menopause is thought to trigger mood changes among women, with changes in female hormone levels contributing to anxiety, depression and stress.

    However, a new study says some women are at more risk than others for menopause-linked mental health issues, and many escape them altogether.

    There's no evidence that menopause causes a universal rise in risk for mental health conditions lik...

    Stressed Parents Could Mean More Self-Harm by Kids

    Teens have a higher risk of self-injury -- deliberately cutting or burning themselves -- if they have a fraught relationship with a struggling parent, a new study shows.

    Teenagers were nearly five times more likely to self-injure if, when they were 6, their moms and dads reported stress and discomfort in their role as parents, researchers found.

    Teens also had a nearly doubled risk ...

    Using Marijuana to Ease Stress? Focus on CBD, not THC

    Folks hoping to quell their anxiety would do best to use cannabis products that don't get them high, a new clinical trial has found.

    The non-intoxicating marijuana compound CBD appears to help manage anxiety better than THC, the chemical in weed that gets people high, researchers say.

    Patients with anxiety randomly assigned to smoke CBD-dominant products experienced greater improvem...

    1 in 5 People Who Attempt Suicide Have No Prior Mental Illness

    One out of every five adults who attempt suicide never met the criteria for a mental illness by the time the attempt happened, new research shows.

    “This finding challenges clinical notions of who is at risk for suicidal behavior and raises questions about the safety of limiting suicide risk screening to psychiatric populations,” concluded a team led by

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 27, 2024
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  • Firsthand Experience of Climate Change Disasters Is Stressing Teens

    Weather disasters driven by climate change are stressing out U.S. teenagers, a new study warns.

    Teens with the most firsthand experience of events like hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, droughts and wildfires were more likely to show signs of mental distress than peers who hadn't been confronted with the effects of climate change, researchers report.

    “We know that climate change has ...

    Mental Health Issues a Prime Driver of Deaths for New Moms: Study

    Data from dozens of studies supports the notion that mental health crises are a big factor behind rising rates of maternal deaths during and around pregnancy in the United States.

    “We need to bring this to the attention of the public and policymakers to demand action to address the mental health crisis that is contributing to the demise of mothers in America," said

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 26, 2024
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  • Grief Affects the Body, Not Just the Mind

    Of course grief can ravage your mind, but science shows it can also weaken your body, leaving you open to illness.

    “As humans, we are strongly motivated to seek out social bonds that are warm, dependable, friendly and supportive,” explained George Slavich. He directs the Laboratory for Stress Assessment and Rese...

    Women Working in Health Care Face Burnout at Higher Rates Than Men

    Women working in health care endure significantly more stress and burnout compared to their male co-workers, a new review concludes.

    Gender inequality, a poor balance between work and life and a lack of workplace autonomy all create pressure on female health care professionals, researchers report.

    On the other hand, there are factors that can protect women from stress and burnout: a...

    Recognize the Signs of Burnout in Yourself and Others

    Burnout: It's a common enough concept, but how do you know if you're experiencing it at work and at home?

    According to experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, a myriad of daily pressures placed on individuals can culminate in burnout.

    “Burnout is not a result of one singular thing,” explained Dr. Eric Storch...

    This Election Year, Health Care Costs Top Voter Concerns: Poll

    Unexpected medical bills and high health care costs are dominating an election where kitchen table economic problems weigh heavily on voter's minds, a new KFF poll has found.

    Voters struggling to pay their monthly bills are most eager to hear presidential candidates talk about economic and health care issues, according to the latest KFF Health Tracking Poll.

    Nearly three in four adu...

    Patients With Depression Face Highest Risk for Suicide in Days After Hospital Discharge

    People treated at psychiatric hospitals are at highest risk of committing suicide immediately after their discharge if they suffer from depression, a new study reports.

    Patients hospitalized for depression are hundreds of times more likely to commit suicide within the first three days of discharge, compared to the suicide rate of the general population, results show.

    “Although we ...

    Political Changes Are Stressing Hispanic Americans: Study

    Immigration has become a contentious topic in America, but new research shows the heated debate on the issue may be stressing out Hispanics across the country, whether they are citizens or not.

    After analyzing data from 2011-2018, the researchers discovered that, over time, there has an increase in psychological distress among all Hispanics as U.S. immigration policies came under fire.

    Access to Opioids Could Be Boosting Suicide Rates

    Increased access to prescription opioids has driven up U.S. suicide rates by making it easier to women to end their lives, a new study claims.

    The study also blames a shrinking federal safety net during tough economic times for rising suicide rates.

    “We contend that the U.S. federal government's weak regulatory oversight of the pharmaceutical industry and tattered social safety ne...

    More Kids, Teens May Be Taking Multiple Psychiatric Meds

    A study of mental health care in Maryland finds an increasing number of children and teens covered by Medicaid are taking multiple psychiatric meds.

    This trend towards "polypharmacy" might be happening elsewhere, prior research suggests.

    In the new study, Maryland kids ages 17 or younger experienced "a 4% increased odds of psychotropic polypharmacy per year from 2015 to 2020," repor...

    Stress Main Factor Driving Teens to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol

    American teenagers cite stress as the leading reason they might get drunk or high, a new report reveals.

    That only underscores the need for better adolescent mental health care, according to the research team behind the study.

    Better "access to treatment and support for mental health concerns and stress could reduce some of the reported motivations for substance use," concluded inve...

    During Grief and Loss, Simple Steps Can Help You Cope

    Filling the day with simple activities could be the key to improving mood and well-being after a person has suffered the loss of a loved one, a new study finds.

    These “uplifts” -- activities that can improve a person's mood -- helped ease grief on a day-to-day basis, researchers reported recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 9, 2024
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  • Late-Life Divorce May Be Mentally Tougher on Women Than Men

    Divorce later in life might be harder on women than on men, based on patterns of antidepressant use in a new study of people aged 50 or older.

    Both sexes tended to increase their antidepressant use when going through a divorce, break-up or the death of a partner, researchers found.

    But women's use of these drugs was greater than men's, results show.

    Antidepressant use increase...

    Music Hath Charms to Boost Mental Health: Poll

    Music may be good medicine for older adults, boosting both their mental and physical health, a new survey finds.

    Virtually all people between the ages of 50 and 80 (98%) say they benefit in at least one health-related way from engaging with music, according to results from the latest University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging.

    ...

    Could Bullying Raise a Teen's Odds for Psychosis?

    The Pearl Jam song “Jeremy” tells the story of a boy driven mad by bullies who commits suicide in front of his classroom.

    The song might reflect a real and ongoing threat to teens' mental health, new research suggests.

    Teens being bullied face a greater risk of early-stage psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations or paranoia, according to findings published recently in the jou...

    Black Americans Lose Sleep After High-Profile Police Killings

    Police killings of unarmed Black people are robbing the Black community of a precious commodity – sleep.

    Black adults across the United States suffer from sleep problems after they're exposed to news of killings that occur during police encounters, a new study published Feb. 5 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine finds.

    Specifically, Black adults experienced increases i...

    Even Mild Cases of COVID Can Leave Lingering Insomnia

    Even mild cases of COVID can trigger insomnia in most people, a new study reports.

    About three out of four people with mild COVID (76%) reported experiencing insomnia following their illness.

    Further, nearly one in four (23%) said they'd experienced severe insomnia, according to results published Feb. 5 in the journal Frontiers in Public Health.

    If you experience insomnia afte...

    Loneliness Is Plaguing Americans in 2024: Poll

    Americans are terribly lonely, a new poll reveals.

    Among U.S. adults, about one in three said they feel lonely at least once a week. Worse, one in 10 Americans say they feel lonely every day, results show.

    Younger people are more likely to experience loneliness, which is defined as a lack of meaningful or close relationships or sense of belonging, according to the American Psychiatr...

    High School Kids Who Use Weed, Alcohol Face Higher Risks for Suicidal Thoughts

    High school students who smoke, drink or use weed are more likely to be emotionally troubled and have suicidal thoughts, a new study finds.

    Teens who turn to nicotine, alcohol or marijuana are more likely to think about suicide, feel depressed or anxious, have psychotic episodes and exhibit inattention or hyperactivity, researchers report Jan. 29 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

    Leaving Pets Behind Adds to Trauma, Danger for People in Crisis

    Imagine being subjected to domestic violence in your home, wanting to escape -- but there's no place you can go that will accept a beloved pet.

    That's the gut-wrenching situation facing too many victims of domestic abuse, according to a new data review spanning 27 years.

    “In a lot of cases of domestic violence, there is evidence to suggest that people will delay leaving their rela...

    Women's Anxiety Rose in States Affected by Fall of Roe v. Wade

    Women are suffering more anxiety and depression in states that banned abortion after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, a new study shows.

    The court's Dobbs decision in June 2022 triggered laws banning abortion in 13 states.

    In the six months after, symptoms of anxiety and depression increased among women living in those states, particularly those ages 18 to 45, researchers r...

    Common Heart Drug Might Lower Anxiety in Kids With Autism

    Could a blood pressure drug thats been around since the 1960s help ease anxiety in people with autism?

    That's the main finding from a small study where 69 people between the ages of 7 and 24 who had autism were given the drug, called propranolol.

    “The findings show that propranolol could serve as a helpful intervention for reduc...

    Looking for a Good Therapist? Experts Offer Guidance

    If you decide to see a therapist, finding one who's right for you presents one of the biggest early hurdles.

    “The field of psychology, psychiatry and psychotherapy has advanced over the years, and one of the ways it has advanced is by learning that certain therapies may work best for certain problems,” said Eric Storch,...

    Quick Withdrawal From Antidepressants Can Take Emotional, Cognitive Toll

    People coming off antidepressants often struggle with emotional and social turmoil, especially if they quit their meds cold turkey, a new study reports.

    Challenges reported by patients quitting antidepressants included feeling overwhelmed by their emotions, finding social situations less enjoyable, and feeling detached and less empathetic towards others.

    “Some symptoms were so sev...

    These Traits Help Keep College Kids Happy

    College freshmen who are more outgoing and agreeable -- and less moody -- are more likely to feel a sense of belonging at their new school, new research has found.

    Those personality traits could result in better academic performance and better mental health during college, the study authors concluded.

    However, two other important personality traits -- conscientiousness and openness ...

    Stressed Teens at Risk of Heart Trouble Years Later

    Stressed-out teens are likely to have more heart health risk factors in adulthood, a new study says.

    Teens with elevated stress levels tended to have high blood pressure, obesity and other heart risk factors as they aged, compared to those teens with less stress, researchers found.

    “Our findings suggest that perceived stress patterns over time have a far-reaching effect on various...

    Bigger Families Could Mean Poorer Mental Health for Kids

    A crowded house may not be the best for the mental health of a family's kids, a new study has found.

    Teens from larger families tend to have poorer mental health than those with fewer siblings, according to a large-scale analysis of children in the United States and China.

    In the United States, children with no or one sibling had the best mental health, while in China well-being was...

    Clues to How Mental Stress Takes Toll on Physical Health

    Stress appears to increase a person's chances of developing metabolic syndrome, a cluster of unhealthy factors that add up to an increased risk for serious problems, a new study finds.

    Inflammation driven by a person's stress levels can make them more likely to develop metabolic syndrome, just as their lifestyle and genetics also contribute to the risk, researchers said.

    So, simple ...

    Overcoming One Phobia Might Ease Other Fears, Study Finds

    Imagine easing a fear of heights by getting over a phobia of spiders.

    That might sound odd, but it works, researchers report.

    Folks who use exposure therapy to overcome one phobia can find themselves less afraid of other things, according to the results of a study published recently in the journal Translat...

    Black Teens Gain Mental Health Boost From 'Connectedness' at School

    "School spirit" appears to provide long-lasting mental health benefits for Black teens, new research finds.

    School connectedness -- the degree to which students feel like part of to their school community -- is a protective factor against depression and aggressive behavior later in life among Black students, researchers report in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

    “Our...

    Getting Hospital-Level Care at Home Is Safe, Effective: Study

    It's an approach that's becoming more widespread: Receiving hospital-level care in the home.

    A new study finds that folks "hospitalized" at home tend to do at least as well as if they'd been checked into a hospital for medical care.

    Patients getting hospital-level care at home have low death rates and are not likely to suffer a setback that requires a quick return to the ER, accordi...

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