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Results for search "Exercise: Misc.".

Health News Results - 403

Skiers Study Suggests Fitness May Stave Off Parkinson's

Love to cross-country ski? Well, all those days spent striding across the snow-covered wilderness may do more than keep you in great physical shape.

Swedish researchers report that very fit long-distance skiers were about 30% less likely to develop Parkinson's disease during their 20-year study.

The research suggests that any activity that keeps you fit might buffer the...

Exercise Surprise: Lifting Less Gets Better Results

Changing up the amount of weight they lift could help weightlifters get stronger with less effort, a new study suggests.

In traditional weight training -- called one rep max -- the maximum weight an athlete can lift dictates the weight load for all sessions.

This study compared one rep max with an approach called load velocity profile, in which athletes lift varying weights ...

'Couch Potato' Lifestyle Poses Danger to Women's Hearts

Most folks know that being a couch potato is bad for their health, but new research suggests that women who spend hours in their chairs and sofas might face greater risks than believed.

Sitting for long periods of time can increase risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, particularly if those bouts of sitting aren't broken up by occasionally getting up and stretching, the study f...

Could High-Tempo Tunes Help Maximize Your Workout?

Gyms are bustling with regulars and resolutioners, all working up a sweat. But what's the secret to an easy, effective workout? It may be in the music.

A new study found that listening to music at a higher tempo reduces the perceived effort of exercise. For endurance exercises, such as walking on a treadmill, the effects were greatest.

"We found that listening to high-tempo mu...

Time Spent on the Links May Lengthen Life

Grab your golf clubs. Spending a day on the green at least once a month may lower the risk of early death among older adults, a new study finds.

About 25 million Americans play golf, which is a sport that can reduce stress and yield exercise benefits. Social in nature and played at a controlled pace, people often continue enjoying the sport into old age.

"Our study is perha...

Got 'Couch Potato' Teens? It's Not Helping Their Mental Health

Getting your surly teens off the couch might trigger a long-term turnaround in their moods, new research suggests.

"Our findings show that young people who are inactive for large proportions of the day throughout adolescence face a greater risk of depression by age 18," said study author Aaron Kandola, a psychiatry Ph.D. student at University College London (UCL).

"We found ...

Healthy Habits Can Slide After Starting Heart Medications

Some people let healthy habits fall by the wayside after they start medications for high cholesterol or high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Of more than 41,000 middle-aged Finnish adults researchers followed, those who started on cholesterol or blood pressure drugs were more likely to stop exercising or gain weight in the years afterward.

The pattern does not prove that ...

High-Tech 'Exoskeleton' Can Give Mobility Back to People With MS

Most people take the ability to move for granted, but not Kathy Miska.

Miska has had multiple sclerosis for two decades now, and her ability to get around has deteriorated steadily.

Now, a new robotic exoskeleton is giving her an opportunity to regain some of the mobility she's lost to the degenerative nerve disease.

"You can definitely tell when you get out of the suit....

Eating Disorders, Exercise Addiction Go Hand in Hand: Study

People with an eating disorder are much more likely to have exercise addiction than those with normal eating habits, British researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 2,100 people who took part in nine studies in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia and Italy.

People with an eating disorder were 3.7 times more likely to have an exercise addiction than those ...

Healthy Living Helps Keep the Flu at Bay

This flu season arrived early and hit children hard, but experts say you can dodge the flu by boosting your immune system.

How? By living a healthy lifestyle and getting sufficient sleep, according to experts from Purdue University's School of Nursing, in West Lafayette, Ind.

So far, nearly 13 million flu cases have been diagnosed this season in the United States, while 39 c...

A Workout Could Be Good Medicine for the Common Cold

It might be the last thing you want to do when you are battling a cold, but exercise might actually make you feel better, suggests one health expert.

Here's why: Physical activity boosts your heart rate and promotes healthy blood flow, and it also opens up your lungs and releases endorphins, said Dr. Jayson Loeffert, a sports medicine physician at Penn State Health in Hershey, Pa.

Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring Worse

Uncle Sam has a message for sluggish Americans: Get moving now.

More than 15% of American adults are physically inactive, a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reports. And all that time on the couch or staring into a computer screen adds to the risk of health problems and premature death.

"Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much...

In the Future, Could Exercise's Benefits Come in a Pill?

The benefits of exercise are well-known, but what if you're not able to take a brisk walk or endure a punishing workout?

Luckily for you, scientists have identified a protein they think might one day help prevent muscle decline in seniors and people who are immobile.

Sestrin, the protein, accumulates naturally in muscle after exercise. The researchers decided to find out mor...

A Lifetime of Fitness Helps Women's Muscles in Old Age

Women who exercise throughout life may keep their muscle power as they age, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., examined muscle strength, power and the size and type of muscle fibers in the thighs of three groups of women.

Seven women in one group were over 70 and had exercised regularly for nearly 50 years. The seco...

Want a Long, Healthy Old Age? A Healthy Middle Age Helps

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

What Matters More for Obesity Risk, Genes or Lifestyle?

A new study suggests that genetics is not destiny when it comes to your odds of becoming obese.

For years, research into "obesity genes" has led many Americans to believe that their DNA makes becoming overweight and obese inevitable.

But the new study shows that daily lifestyle -- not genes -- probably plays the much bigger role.

The study tracked data on more tha...

Music Does Give Your Workout a Boost

Gymgoers who've accidentally left their headphones at home might be all too familiar with this frustrating feeling: Exercising without music is a much harder go.

And now a broad new review of nearly 140 studies -- the first of its kind -- suggests there's real science to back that up, with clear evidence that music not only makes exercise seem easier and more enjoyable but actually re...

Want to Turn Back the Aging Clock? Train for a Marathon

Your New Year's resolution to run a marathon for the first time could be your ticket to a younger and healthier heart, a new study suggests.

First-time marathon runners experience health benefits that essentially turn back time on their circulatory system, researchers report.

"Training for a marathon -- even as a novice runner -- has significant benefits on the cardiovascula...

New Year's Resolutions Didn't Stick? Try a Monday Reset

You made your resolution -- this year was finally going to be the year you lost weight. But then your neighbor stopped by with a plate of cookies, and well, your resolve didn't even last a day. Maybe next year?

But instead of looking at your resolutions as a sweeping year-long project, what if you concentrated on making healthy changes every Monday? That way, if you slip up and dive ...

Have a Ball With These Exercises to Strengthen Your Core

Pilates is an excellent exercise discipline that develops strength and agility, and you don't need to take formal classes or use Pilates machines to get its benefits. Using a stability ball with floor exercises is tailor made to target your core -- the muscles of your abdomen.

Here are three to try from the American Council on Exercise. Note: Choose a ball between 7 inches and 10 inc...

Some Solid Advice on New Year's Resolutions That Might Stick

If you plan to make a New Year's resolution about improving your health, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some good suggestions.

"With too many holiday sweets and not enough exercise likely in the rearview mirror, now is the perfect time to consider your personal goals and how you can make positive health choices in the coming year," AMA President Dr. Patrice Harris said in ...

Do Your Heart a Favor: Bike, Walk to Work

Leave your car in the garage if you can: A new study suggests that walking or biking to work could cut your risk of a heart attack.

The researchers analyzed 2011 data from 43 million working adults in England and found that 11.4% were active commuters, with 8.6% walking to work and 2.8% cycling to work.

In areas where walking or cyclin...

Regular Exercise Cuts Odds for 7 Major Cancers

Exercise may reduce the odds you'll develop any of seven types of cancer -- and a new study suggests the more you exercise, the lower your risk.

That's the conclusion of researchers who pooled data from nine published studies that included more than 750,000 men and women.

"We found that the recommended amount of physical activity was in fact associated with significantly r...

To Avoid Falls, Check Your Balance

Bad balance is a common cause of dangerous falls, especially among older adults. Falls send more than 2 million adults to the emergency room every year and often result in lengthy rehab stays.

Preventing falls is a priority for staying healthy and preventing painful broken bones as you age. Easy strength and balance exercises that you can do anytime, anywhere, such as tai chi and yoga...

The Pluses of 'Steady-State' Training

It's hard to escape all the fanfare surrounding HIIT, or high-intensity interval training, which prevents plateaus by keeping your body at your max heart rate for very short intervals.

But another training approach called steady-state training, or SST, may be just as important, if not more so, depending on what you're trying to accomplish.

Steady-state training is the oppos...

How to Stay Fit When You're Traveling for Work or Fun

If you travel a lot for business or pleasure, you may think that the most exercise possible is lugging your bags in and out of a car or through an airport. But it's important to get in real exercise even when you're away from home.

If you're a business road-tripper, look for snippets of time to move those muscles, like when you stop for gas. Any bodyweight calisthenics will do. Think:...

Getting Active Helps Kids' Hearts, Even in the Obese

Regular exercise reduces heart risk factors in overweight and obese kids, researchers report.

Their study included 175 inactive boys and girls, aged 8 to 11, who took part in afterschool programs.

All of them did homework for about a half-hour and had a healthy snack. Some were randomly selected to do instructor-led physical activity such as jumping rope and playing tag for ...

What If 'Exercise Needed to Burn Off Calories' Was Included on Food Labeling?

Would you change your grocery list if a food label said "Walk an hour to burn off the calories in this product"?

That's the idea behind a new push to include food labeling that describes the amount of exercise needed to burn off calories consumed, the researchers behind a new study said.

This labeling approach "is a simple strategy that could be easily included on food/bever...

Playing Sports Might Sharpen Your Hearing

Playing sports may improve the brain's ability to process sounds, a finding that could lead to new therapies for people who struggle with hearing, researchers report.

"No one would argue against the fact that sports lead to better physical fitness, but we don't always think of brain fitness and sports," said study senior author Nina Kraus. She's a professor of communication sciences a...

Good Workouts Might Extend a Woman's Life

If you can tackle a tough workout, that may bode well for your longevity, new research suggests.

A woman's risk of dying from heart disease, cancer or other causes is much lower if she can engage in vigorous exercise, scientists report.

The new study included more than 4,700 middle-aged and older women, average age 64, who were referred for treadmill exercise echocardiograph...

Healthy Lifestyle, Regular Screening May Keep Cancer at Bay

A healthy lifestyle might be your best defense against cancer, an expert says.

About 42% of cancer cases and 45% of cancer deaths are attributable to modifiable risk factors, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Modifiable risk factors are behaviors within one's control, such as eating right, not smoking, and being physically active," said Dr. Michael Hall, cha...

4 in 5 Adolescents Worldwide Don't Exercise Enough

Four of five older children and teens around the world don't get the recommended amount of physical activity, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data gathered between 2001 and 2016 from 1.6 million students, aged 11 to 17, in 146 countries. They found that 81% of them did not meet World Health Organization recommendations for an hour of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity e...

Time to Rethink Ideas About Exercise, Sickle Cell Disease?

Mild exercise is safe and beneficial for people with sickle cell disease, contrary to traditional beliefs, a new study finds.

Sickle cell disease affects blood flow in the body. Because strenuous exercise boosts blood flow, it can lead to heart problems and severe pain in someone with sickle cell. As a result, many patients are advised to avoid all types of exercise.

However...

Most Docs Don't Know Hair Care Is a Barrier to Exercise for Black Women

The extra care that black women's hairstyles can require is often a barrier to exercise, but many U.S. health care providers aren't even aware of the problem, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the department of family medicine at Ohio State University, and found that 95% of them sometimes/often discuss exercise with bl...

For Older Adults, More Exercise Lowers Heart Disease Risk

Regular exercise lowers older adults' risk of heart disease and stroke, even if they have health problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes, researchers say.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from more than 1 million people aged 60 and older in South Korea. The study participants' health was checked in 2009 to 2010, again in 2011 to 2012, and they were followed until ...

Exercise Tweaks to Revitalize Your Workout Regimen

Is your workout routine in a slump? To keep challenging your body, it's important to tweak your regimen every three months or each season.

By aligning these changes to seasonal changes, you can also start the right prep for the next season's sports, such as training for skiing in the fall and hiking in the spring. To begin, grab a calendar and chart out your key dates and activities.

AHA News: On Chicago's South Side, Revitalization Aims for 'Culture of Health'

Washington Heights, a historic neighborhood on Chicago's far South Side, faces the modern-day challenge of boosting health, education and economic opportunities for its residents.

At the forefront of this revitalization effort is The Endeleo Institute, and its success stories are multiplying.

"Endeleo" is a Swahili term for progress and growth. The nonprofit aims to create...

The Essential Upper Arm Shape-Up

Just because your upper arms are temporarily hidden under sweaters and jackets doesn't mean you should neglect them. Here's how to tone them with weights for better definition now and when they're fully back in view.

Hammer Curls: These are an effective variation of the bicep curl. Stand straight, a dumbbell in each hand, arms at your sides, wrists facing inward. Without moving...

Even a Little Exercise May Bring a Brain Boost

Just 10 minutes of exercise a day appears to sharpen mental prowess, new research suggests.

"Getting off the couch and walking a block can help keep you on the right track," said study author Nicole Spartano, a research assistant professor at Boston University School of Medicine.

Her team looked 2,770 participants in the Framingham Heart Study who were divided into two group...

Exercise Can Help Prevent Depression, Even for Those at High Risk

Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

But that was less likely for people who were more active at the study's ...

Bringing Up the Rear: A Workout for Your Glutes

When it comes to sculpting a better booty, here's the bottom line: You need to strengthen your glutes. And more than giving these muscles a toned look, working them also improves the mobility of your hips, helps stabilize your core and eases lower back pain. Here are three to add to your repertoire.

Pulsing Squats: This is a great variation of the classic squat. Stand straight ...

Run for Your Life, New Study Recommends

Even a little running on a regular basis can extend your life, Australian researchers say.

They analyzed 14 studies that included more than 232,000 people whose health was tracked for between 5.5 and 35 years. During the study periods, nearly 26,000 participants died.

The collective data showed that any amount of running was associated with a 30% lower risk of death from...

Ways to Make Exercise More Enjoyable

Only about half of all American adults meet the national guidelines for aerobic activity and only about one-fifth meet the combined aerobic and strength-training goals. One reason is that some people just don't find it enjoyable, so they don't stick with it.

Changing your mindset can lead not only to increases in exercise time, but also feeling good about working out.

A stu...

The Secret to Shapelier, Stronger Calves

When it comes to sculpting muscles, it's easy to overlook your calves. But toning and strengthening your lower legs will make them look and feel great.

What's more, it will make these muscles more effective at their key jobs, which include supporting joints from your ankles to your hips.

Start with simple calf raises, an excellent exercise you can do anywhere because it doe...

Too Little Time to Exercise? Survey Suggests Otherwise

"I'd love to exercise more, but I just can't find the time."

It's a common refrain from many Americans but, for most, it might also be untrue, a new survey finds.

Researchers at the nonprofit RAND Corporation polled more than 32,000 Americans over the age of 14.

The survey found that, generally, people have an average of more than five hours of leisure time per day...

Get Moving: Exercise Can Help Lower Older Women's Fracture Risk

Older women who get even light exercise, like a daily walk, may lower their risk of suffering a broken hip, a large study suggests.

A number of studies have linked regular exercise to a lower risk of hip fracture -- a potentially disabling or even fatal injury for older adults. Each year, more than 300,000 people in the United States aged 65 or older are hospitalized for a broken hip,...

Quad Training for Knee Support

Whether you're mountain biking, kicking a soccer ball with friends, or just sprinting down the street to catch a bus, your quadriceps are hard at work.

The quads are the large muscles that run down the fronts of your thighs. The stronger they are, the less strain each movement will exert on your knees. Lunges and squats will keep these muscles in tip-top shape.

The basic...

The Exercise Effect and Prediabetes

If you've been told that your blood glucose is higher than normal and that you have prediabetes, your doctor is likely to first suggest lifestyle steps to stop it from progressing to diabetes.

The steps that can have the most benefit are losing weight and improving your diet, which obviously go hand in hand.

But studies also show that different types of exercise can play an...

A Workout to Protect Your Thumbs

The range of motion of the human thumb makes so many everyday hand movements possible. Whether you're an athlete gripping sports equipment, a baker whisking egg whites or a do-it-yourselfer hammering a nail, you'd be at a total loss without your thumbs. Yet most people do little to protect these overlooked but essential digits.

First, be aware of the common ways you can injure your th...

A Workout to Shape Your Shoulders

Don't shrug off working your delts, the muscles of your shoulders. Besides assisting with good posture, strong shoulders help you lift and carry items with ease, and create excellent upper body definition for men and women alike.

Deltoid rows work not only your shoulders, but also your biceps, lats and the muscles of your middle back. Begin in a standing position, knees slightl...

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