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Results for search "Inflammation".

14 Feb

Chronic Inflammation A Memory Thief?

Chronic inflammation in middle-age may increase risk for cognitive problems later in life.

Health News Results - 48

Fat Collects in Lungs, Raising Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Excess weight is hard on the heart, but new research shows it may also harm your lungs.

The study found that higher amounts of fat collect in the airways of overweight and obese people, which may help explain why they're more likely to have wheezing and asthma.

In the study, the investigators analyzed lung samples donated by 52 peopl...

Could Vitamin C Infusions Save Patients With Sepsis?

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Massive vitamin C infusions could be a life-saver for patients with sepsis, an inflammatory condition run amok, new research suggests.

Sepsis is a leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals, claiming as many as 300,000 lives a year, according to the U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

"It's literally an explosion of th...

Gum Disease Might Raise Your Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, Sept. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's a compelling reason to keep those dreaded appointments with your dentist: New research suggests that red, tender or bleeding gums could trigger high blood pressure.

In a review of 81 studies that included more than 250,000 people, U.K. scientists found that those who had moderate to severe gum disease (periodontitis) had a 22% incr...

How to Fight Hidden Causes of Inflammation

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tamping down inflammation is a must for people with a chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. But you can be exposed to damaging inflammation without having a specific medical condition.

Inflammation prevents the body from adequately reacting to stressors and puts the aging process on an unwanted fast track, increas...

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state heal...

Cases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep Rising

THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chance Ammirata was a vaper for almost two years. But three weeks ago, the 18-year-old began to have trouble breathing.

"I would say my chest felt like it was collapsing and tightening up, and I couldn't breathe," he told CBS News. After going to the emergency room, doctors told him his right lung had a hole in it and they would have...

Health Threats Don't End for Some Sepsis Survivors

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that lands its victims in the hospital, but the dangers don't end for survivors who have high levels of inflammation long after being discharged, a new study finds.

"Sepsis is the leading cause of death among hospitalized patients. Patients discharged from the hospital aren't out of the woods yet. Approxim...

Preterm Births to Hispanic Women Climbed After Trump's Election

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of preterm births to Hispanic women in the United States inched up shortly after the 2016 election -- raising the question of whether the political climate played a role, researchers say.

The study, of births between 2009 and 2017, found an uptick in preterm deliveries among Hispanic women that occurred in the nine months after Pres...

For Kids With Rare Condition, 'Restricted' Diets Can Turn Dangerous

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two young patients -- one 3 and the other 13 -- have a rare condition that calls for a highly restricted diet. Both have so much trouble eating that they developed an eating disorder and required feeding tubes, a new report shows.

Such is the fate of some of those with eosinophilic esophagitis (EOE), a chronic inflammatory disease that affec...

Infections, Especially UTIs, May Be Triggers for Strokes

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A urinary tract infection might be more than just a painful nuisance for some, with new research suggesting it could raise the risk of stroke in vulnerable people.

The study of over 190,000 stroke patients found that the risk of suffering a stroke was heightened in the weeks and months following any infection that required a trip to the hosp...

Younger Gout Patients Have Higher Odds for Blood Clots

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Older age raises the odds of many ills, but for adults with gout, it's the younger ones who have the highest risk for developing a serious blood clot, new research indicates.

Gout patients of any age have a 25% greater risk of developing a blood clot deep in the veins in the first 10 years after diagnosis, the British study found.

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Who's Most Likely to Miss School Due to Eczema?

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed more than a decade of data on more than 8,000 2- to 17-year-olds enrolled in a national eczema registry. Overall, 3.3% missed six or more days of school over a six-month period.

...

For Many With Mild Asthma, Popular Rx May Not Work: Study

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A widely used type of asthma medication may not work in more than half of patients who are prescribed it, new research shows.

Inhaled corticosteroids, which are designed to reduce airway inflammation, are recommended for all patients with persistent asthma.

But this medication's effectiveness may be limited to a type of inflammation ...

Anger a Threat to Health in Old Age

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of loved ones can hit the elderly particularly hard, but a new study suggests it's anger, and not sadness, that may damage the aging body more.

Anger can increase inflammation, which is linked with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and arthritis, the researchers said.

"As most people age, they simply cannot do the act...

The Benefits of an Anti-Inflammatory Diet

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The body's immune system is designed to fight off threats, like infection-causing germs, through a process called inflammation. But a steady state of inflammation can lead to everything from diabetes to autoimmune diseases to heart disease to cancer.

Many of these health threats don't come from foreign invaders like scary bacteria, but from...

Caregiving May Not Be as Taxing to Your Health as Feared

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being a family caregiver may not be as hazardous to your health as most people think, researchers say.

Decades of research papers and media reports have warned that family caregivers are at risk for health declines. One suggested reason is that the stress of caregiving can increase inflammation and weaken the immune system.

For this...

Dry Eye and Migraines Might Be Linked: Study

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with migraines may be at higher odds of also having chronic dry eye disease, and that's especially true for seniors, new research shows.

The 10-year study of almost 73,000 people cared for at ophthalmology clinics in North Carolina found that -- after accounting for certain medication use and other factors -- people with migraine had a...

Low-Carb Diets Linked to Higher Odds for A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Keto, Paleo, Atkins -- there's no shortage of low-carb diets to try, but new research suggests that over time, living low-carb can raise your risk of a heart condition called atrial fibrillation, or a-fib.

People who regularly got fewer than 45 percent of their calories from carbohydrates were 18 percent more likely to develop a-fib than p...

High-Fat Diets Do No Favors for Your Gut Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Has a high-fat meal ever left you feeling bloated and sluggish? It turns out that a heavier fat diet may keep the many bacteria that live in your digestive system from doing their best, too.

New research found that when people boosted their fat intake to 40 percent of their daily diet for six months, the number of "good" gut bacteria decre...

How Inactivity and Junk Food Can Harm Your Brain

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're in your 50s and your typical day involves sitting at a desk followed by lounging on the sofa and succumbing to late-night snacks, the long-term toll on your mind might be greater than you think.

Like dominoes, an unhealthy lifestyle can trigger inflammation throughout your body, which can then accelerate wear-and-tear on your brai...

Hepatitis C Screening Can Help Prevent Liver Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with the hepatitis C virus can cause liver disease and even liver cancer. But once found, the virus can be cured, so screening is vital for those at risk, health experts say.

For hepatitis A and B, preventive vaccines exist, but there is none for hepatitis C.

"We can eliminate the virus and keep people from developing live...

Physical Therapy Can Help You Avoid Opioids When Joint Pain Strikes

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who get prompt physical therapy for pain in the knee, shoulder or lower back may have less need for opioid painkillers, new research suggests.

The study, of nearly 89,000 U.S. patients, found that people given physical therapy for their pain were 7 percent to 16 percent less likely to fill a prescription for an opioid.

The res...

How the Mediterranean Diet Can Help Women's Hearts

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who stick to a Mediterranean diet have a 25 percent lower risk of heart disease -- and researchers say they're starting to understand why.

"Our study has a strong public health message that modest changes in known cardiovascular disease risk factors, particularly those relating to inflammation, glucose metabolism and insulin resistanc...

After a Spouse's Death, Sleep Woes Up Health Risks

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The death of a spouse can understandably bring sleepless nights. Now, research suggests those sleep troubles raise the odds of immune system dysfunction -- which in turn can trigger chronic inflammation.

For the surviving spouse, that could mean an increased risk for heart disease and cancer, though the study did not prove a cause-and-effect l...

Tennis Elbow 'Treatments' Bring Little Relief: Study

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Treatments for "tennis elbow" are generally ineffective, researchers say, but don't despair: The painful condition will usually clear up on its own.

Each year, approximately 200,000 Americans are diagnosed with tennis elbow -- inflammation caused by overuse of the tendons in the forearm. The condition can affect anyone who uses their hands a...

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role.

The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is caused by hyperuricemia -- high blood levels of uric aci...

Brain Scans Suggest Pain of Fibromyalgia Isn't Imaginary

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People with fibromyalgia have widespread inflammation in their brains, new research reveals.

"Finding an objective neurochemical change in the brains of people who are used to being told that their problems are imaginary is pretty important," explained senior study author Marco Loggia. He is associate director of the Center for Integrative P...

Why Eczema Is Tougher to Treat for Black Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, can be very difficult to control in some people.

But the skin condition, which leads to dry, itchy and inflamed skin, is particularly problematic for black people, according to new research.

Scientists who examined patients' skin on a molecular level found that compared to Americans of European ances...

Injected Drug May Be New Weapon Against Gout

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new approach to preventing gout attacks looks promising for people not already helped by existing treatments.

Researchers are looking at an anti-inflammatory drug called canakinumab (Ilaris) to treat this painful form of arthritis.

Instead of targeting excessively high uric acid levels as existing gout drugs do, the new strategy...

Stigma Another Burden for Many With Psoriasis

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Though psoriasis is not contagious, many Americans shun people with the skin condition, new research indicates.

The study included a cross-section of about 400 Americans who viewed images of people with visible psoriasis. Large numbers wrongly thought psoriasis was contagious or only affects the skin, and about one-third said they wouldn't w...

New Drug of Last Resort Tackles Resistant HIV

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is typically a manageable infection, but medications that keep the virus at bay don't work for everyone. Now, researchers have developed a new medication to help them.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug -- ibalizumab (Trogarzo) -- in March. Phase 3 trial results were published in the Aug...

Can Eating Crickets Boost Your Health?

MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Jiminy Cricket! New research suggests that saving room on your plate for some crunchy, chirpy protein might be good for your health.

Specifically, eating crickets may help improve the natural bacteria in your gut (microbiome) and reduce inflammation in your body.

In a small pilot trial, the study team gave 20 volunteers a bugs-...

Hidden Blood in Feces May Signal Deadly Conditions

MONDAY, July 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even if it's not visible to the naked eye, blood in the stool can be serious -- a sign of a potentially fatal disease other than colon cancer, new research suggests.

This could include circulatory, respiratory, digestive, blood, hormonal or neuropsychological diseases, the Scottish scientists said.

A test that picks up unseen blood i...

Even at 'Safe' Levels, Air Pollution May Boost Diabetes Risk

FRIDAY, June 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Add another health harm to air pollution: New research suggests it might increase the risk of diabetes, even at levels considered safe.

Cutting air pollution could reduce diabetes rates in countries with both higher and lower levels of air pollution, the researchers said.

"Our research shows a significant link between air pollution a...

Exercise May Ease Inflammation Tied to Obesity

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Bicycling or other regular exercise may help reduce harmful inflammation in obese people, a new study suggests.

Physical activity tames inflammation by changing blood characteristics, according to a team led by Dr. Michael De Lisio, of the University of Ottawa in Canada.

Chronic inflammation is behind many of the health problems...

E-Cig Flavorings May Damage Lining of Blood Vessels

THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Flavorings used in e-cigarettes harm blood vessel cells in a way that could trigger future heart damage, a new study suggests.

Five flavorings tested in the lab damaged the heart-protective functions of endothelial cells, which line the inside of blood vessels and the heart, said study author Jessica Fetterman. She's an assistant professor o...

Widely Used Antibacterial Tied to Colon Woes in Mice

WEDNESDAY, May 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to triclosan -- a chemical in some shampoos and toothpastes -- might raise the risk for colon inflammation and colon cancer, at least in mice, researchers say.

New study results "suggest that triclosan could have adverse effects on gut health," said study leader Guodong Zhang, a food scientist at the University of Massachusetts Amhe...

Too Much or Too Little Weight May Worsen Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, April 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity may accelerate and amplify the crippling symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.

Conversely, the researchers also found that unexplained weight loss might also signal problems for these patients, because it could mean that they're at greater risk for disability.

"While patients and rheumatologists may be foc...

Why Americans' Life Expectancy Is Getting Longer

FRIDAY, April 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans appear to be aging slower than they used to, which may help explain recent gains in life expectancy, researchers say.

The researchers compared how biological age changed in the United States compared to age in years (chronological age). For the study, the investigators looked at national health surveys conducted 1988-1994 and 2007-20...

Waning Vaccine Protection May Be Driving Rise in U.S. Mumps Cases

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A resurgence of mumps among young American adults is likely as the protection provided by childhood vaccinations weakens, researchers warn.

"Vaccination is the centerpiece of current public health strategy against mumps," said study co-author Joseph Lewnard, a postdoctoral research fellow with the Harvard School of Public Health's Center f...

Mom's Immune System May Affect Baby's Brain

TUESDAY, March 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If a pregnant woman's immune system is activated, it can affect her child's brain development, new research suggests.

A number of triggers -- infections, stress, illness and allergies -- can activate the immune system. This causes proteins to be released as part of an inflammatory response.

Previous research in animals has shown tha...

Why the Flu Makes You Feel So Miserable

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're unlucky enough to come down with the flu, you can blame your own body for your fever, cough, muscle aches and head-to-toe distress, experts say.

Most of influenza's misery is caused by the human body itself, or more precisely the immune system's response to the virus.

"Many of the things that feel bad are the body's attemp...

More Bad News on Flu: It's Tied to Higher Heart Attack Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A bad case of the flu can trigger a short-lived, but substantial, spike in some people's heart attack risk, new research suggests.

Among 332 heart attack patients, the complication was six times more likely to strike following a bout of the flu, researchers reported.

The findings come in the midst of a particularly brutal flu seas...

These Foods May Up Your Odds for Colon Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

These foods all increase inflammation in your body, and the inflammation they cause is associated with a higher chance of developing colon cancer, according to pooled data from two major health studies.

...

Switching to Whole Grain Foods Could Trim Your Waistline

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Put down that forkful of perfectly twirled white spaghetti, and grab a plate of whole grain pasta instead.

You'll feel fuller after switching out highly processed white grains for whole-grain alternatives, a new study from Denmark contends. Plus, you'll likely lose a little bit of weight and have reduced inflammation. Those changes could be ...

These Foods May Help Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Have rheumatoid arthritis? Treat yourself to some blueberries and a cup of green tea.

They're among the foods that could ease the pain, swelling and stiffness in your joints and even slow progression of the disease, researchers say.

Dried plums, pomegranates, whole grains, the spices ginger and turmeric, and olive oil may also he...

New Finding Hints at Clue to Dementia

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammation in middle age may increase the risk for brain shrinkage and dementia in old age, a new study suggests.

The researchers tested more than 1,600 people for five "biomarkers" of inflammation in their blood when they were, on average, 53 years old. About 24 years later, the participants were given brain scans and a memory test.

...

Textured Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A particular breast implant may be associated with a rare type of cancer, researchers report.

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is estimated to affect 1 in 30,000 women each year, but researchers said it may actually be more common.

"We're seeing that this cancer is likely very underreported, and as ...

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