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Results for search "Pollution, Air".

17 Jul

Two Major Air Pollutants Decline During COVID-19 Pandemic

Researchers say the improvement is likely temporary.

10 Dec

Health Benefits of Reducing Air Pollution

Can death rates and heart disease decline just one week after an indoor smoking ban starts?

Health News Results - 118

Air Pollution May Harm Older Women's Brains

Pollutants in the air -- fine particulates that are 30 times smaller than the width of a strand of hair -- may be damaging older women's brains.

In a new study, researchers linked breathing in high levels of this polluted air to shrinkage in areas of the brain that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease.

"Fine-particle pollution is kind of like a cocktail. There are a lot of differen...

Dirty Air Endangers Homeless People: Study

Air pollution poses a threat to homeless people's mental and physical health, researchers say.

They asked 138 homeless people in Salt Lake City about when and how they knew the air was polluted and how air pollution makes them feel. They also examined their health records.

More than half the people said they'd had physical reactions to air pollution (such as headaches and difficulty...

High Ozone Levels Up Cardiac Arrest Risk: Study

High levels of ozone air pollution could increase the risk of cardiac arrest, a new study says.

It included 187,000 people, average age 63, in the United States who suffered out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2013 and 2016.

Their exposure to ozone air pollution was estimated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data on daily ozone levels in different regions.

F...

Can Air Pollution Make COVID Even Deadlier?

People with long-term exposure to air pollutants may be more likely to die from COVID-19, according to a new study.

In an analysis of more than 3,000 U.S. counties, researchers found that just a small increase in long-term average exposure to fine-particle pollutants (PM2.5) upped the risk of death from COVID by more than 10%.

The study was published Nov. 4 in the journal Scienc...

Smog Could Increase COVID-19 Deaths by 15% Worldwide

Long-term exposure to air pollution is tied to an increased risk of dying from COVID-19, a new study finds.

About 15% of deaths from COVID-19 worldwide could be due to long-term exposure to air pollution, the researchers said. In Europe, the proportion was about 19%, in North America about 17% and in East Asia about 27%.

These proportions are an estimate of "the fraction of COVID-19...

COVID-19 Lockdowns Improved Air, Prevented Deaths

Lockdowns in China and Europe to blunt the spread of COVID-19 resulted in better air quality and thousands of lives saved, a new study finds.

Researchers found that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations dropped 30% in China and 17% in parts of Europe.

PM2.5 are tiny airborne particles that come from combustion including industrial emissions, transportation, wildfires and ch...

Smog Tied to Raised Risk for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Disease

As the air people breathe gets dirtier, their odds for serious neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and other dementias rises, new research shows.

The long-term study of more than 63 million older Americans can't prove cause and effect, but does show a strong association between air pollution and brain disorders. The researchers said the link was seen even a...

Air Pollutants, Metals Are Reaching The Placenta,  Study Finds

Metals and other air pollutants have been found in the placentas of new mothers, which means such pollutants may be able to reach the fetus, researchers report.

"Our study for the first time shows that inhaled carbon particulate matter in air pollution travels in the blood stream, and is taken up by important cells in the placenta. We hope that this information will encourage policy m...

Wildfire Smoke Poses Special Threat to People With Asthma

People with asthma and other respiratory illnesses need to be aware of the threat that wildfire smoke poses to their breathing and take steps to protect themselves, an allergy expert warns.

Wildfires are raging across western U.S. states, and the smoke is spreading across much of the country.

It's important for everyone -- especially children and people with asthma and other...

How Would Americans' Health Improve If All Cars Were Electric?

America's air would become remarkably cleaner if the country accelerated its transition to electric cars that don't rely on fossil fuels, the American Lung Association said in a new report Tuesday.

A full transition to electric cars by 2040 would also result in fewer deaths, asthma attacks, heart attacks, strokes and other health problems related to air pollution, said William Barrett...

Wildfires Ravage Land, and Lungs, Across the U.S. West

HVAC repairman Brad Sissell shrugged off the acid-yellow air surrounding him and kept working, preparing a gas pipe for a new range going into a Salem, Ore., home.

Less than a half-hour's drive away, nearly 200,000 acres were burning in one of the major Oregon wildfires that has sent a full tenth of the state's population fleeing for shelter.

But it was a workday and so Siss...

West Coast Wildfires, COVID a Double Whammy to Lung Health

Even as wildfires rage across California, Oregon and Washington, another danger lurks in the eerie orange haze that has enveloped U.S. cities, towns and neighborhoods this week: an increased risk of catching COVID-19.

Wildfire smoke can irritate the lungs and harm the immune system, explained Dr. Cheryl Pirozzi, a pulmonologist at University of Utah Health. The particulate pollution c...

Harmful Flame Retardants Detected in College-Classroom Dust

Indoor spaces often contains harmful chemicals, say researchers who found high levels of toxic flame retardants in the dust of some U.S. college classrooms.

The chemicals have been linked to thyroid disease, infertility, decreased IQ, cancer and other health problems. They were released by furniture in the facilities.

When they get into dust, the chemicals can enter your bod...

Hot Asphalt Releases a Lot of Pollution Into the Air

Asphalt baking in the summer sunshine is no fun for tender feet, but a new study suggests it's not doing your lungs any favors either.

As it heats up, asphalt releases chemical compounds that contribute to air pollution. And its emissions double as its temperature increases from 104 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit, researchers found.

Sunlight plays a key role in these asphalt emis...

Air Pollution Tied to Asthma in Young Kids

High levels of air pollution may increase young children's risk of developing asthma and persistent wheezing, researchers warn.

The findings "support emerging evidence that exposure to air pollution might influence the development of asthma," according to a report by Torben Sigsgaard, of Aarhus University in Denmark, and colleagues.

For the new study, the researchers analyze...

Autopsies Show Microplastics in All Major Human Organs

Microscopic bits of plastic have most likely taken up residence in all of the major filtering organs in your body, a new lab study suggests.

Researchers found evidence of plastic contamination in tissue samples taken from the lungs, liver, spleen and kidneys of donated human cadavers.

"We have detected these chemicals of plastics in every single organ that we have investigat...

Look Beyond Fossil Fuels to Curb Air Pollution

Burning fossil fuels account for about 100,000 air pollution-related deaths in the United States each year -- but there are other less obvious sources of deadly air pollution, a new study warns.

"People usually think of power plants and cars, but nowadays, livestock and wood stoves are as big of a problem. It's also our farms and our homes," said Sumil Thakrar, a postdoctoral research...

If Mom-to-Be Lives Near Airport, Odds for Preemie Birth Rise

The roar of jet engines may pose a hidden danger to babies: higher odds of premature birth tied to plane exhaust.

So finds a study showing that pregnant women exposed to high levels of pollution from the exhaust of jet planes are 14% more likely to deliver prematurely than women exposed to lower levels.

Researchers looked at exposure to small-particle air pollution amon...

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's: Study

First responders to the 9/11 terrorist attacks appear to be at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia, new research suggests.

The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild thinking impairments among them is well-known, and now two studies from Stony Brook University in New York have identified changes in their brains similar to those in dementia patient...

Toxic Lead Fallout From Notre Dame Fire May Be Worse Than Thought

A ton of dangerous lead dust may have been deposited around Notre Dame cathedral in Paris when it burned in April 2019 -- far more than had been estimated, a new study suggests.

The cathedral's roof and spire were covered in 460 tons of lead -- a neurotoxic metal that's especially dangerous to children -- and questions have been raised about how much lead was released into nearby neig...

Even in Dirty Air, Working Out Can Help Cut Risk of High Blood Pressure

Regular exercise can reduce your risk of high blood pressure, even if you live in an area with high levels of air pollution, new research shows.

The new study included more than 140,000 adults in Taiwan who did not have high blood pressure and who were followed for an average of five years.

The researchers found that those who were highly active and exposed to low levels of ...

U.S. Air Quality Got Better During Pandemic: Study

U.S. air quality improved after businesses closed to reduce the spread of the new coronavirus, researchers say.

For their new study, they compared air pollution data for 122 U.S. counties between March 13 and April 21, to the same dates and locations going back to 2017.

"It has been shown that high air pollution may play a role in exacerbating respiratory diseases, including...

Smog Harms Women's Brains, But One Food May Help Buffer the Damage

Dirty air is the curse of urban living, and studies have shown that breathing it in harms the brains of men and women alike.

But a new study suggests that diet can help reverse the damage: Older women who regularly ate fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids seemed to better withstand the neurological effects of smog.

"Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to fight inflammation and m...

Will COVID Pandemic's Environmental Benefit Last?

It has been the sole silver lining in the coronavirus pandemic -- cleaner air and water on the planet. But will it continue?

A new study says that isn't yet clear.

"The pandemic raises two important questions related to the environment," said study author Christopher Knittel, from the MIT Sloan School of Management in Boston. "First, what is the short-run impact on fossil fu...

U.S. Air Pollution Still at Deadly Levels, Study Finds

Fine particulate air pollution remains at levels deadly to older Americans, a new study finds.

If U.S. air quality standards for fine particulate pollution ((PM2.5) complied with World Health Association guidelines, more than 140,000 lives could be saved over a decade, say researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston.

"Our new study included t...

Fireworks Are Bad News for Your Lungs

A new threat has been added to the risks posed by fireworks -- they can release toxic metals that can damage your lungs.

These metals give fireworks their colors, according to researchers who found harmful levels of lead in two of 12 types of commercially available fireworks they tested.

"While many are careful to protect themselves from injury from explosions, our results s...

Wildfire Smoke Causes Rapid Damage to Your Health: Study

Wildfire smoke has an almost immediate harmful effect on the heart and lungs, researchers say.

Using data from wildfire seasons between 2010 and 2015 in British Columbia, Canada, the researchers linked exposure to elevated levels of fine particles in smoke with ambulance dispatches for heart and lung conditions. Dispatches rose within an hour of exposure to wildfire smoke, the investi...

Even Small Reductions in Air Pollution Help The Heart

Long-term exposure to fine particle air pollution is a major risk factor for heart disease and death, but even small reductions in pollution levels can reduce the threat, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 157,000 adults, aged 35 to 70, in 21 countries.

Between 2003 and 2018, more than 9,100 people had heart disease events, including more than 4,000 ...

As Pandemic Leads to Clearer Skies, Solar Energy Output Rises

Here's some truly sunny news out of the coronavirus pandemic.

Lower levels of air pollution resulting from people staying at home have enabled more sunlight to reach solar panels and increased their output of clean energy.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from Delhi, India, one of the world's most polluted cities, and published their findings June 19 in the journal ...

How the Saharan Dust Plume Could Make Your Allergies Worse

As the giant Saharan dust plume continues its 5,000-mile journey across the Atlantic Ocean, experts warn that people in its path can expect to have flare-ups of allergies and asthma.

The massive dust cloud is expected to hit the U.S. Gulf Coast this week.

"The tiny dust particles contained in the plume will cause eye, nose and throat irritation for anyone who comes in thei...

Coming This Way: Huge Saharan Dust Plume Will Affect Americans' Health

A pandemic, a slew of protests -- and now a huge blanket of Sahara Desert dust will engulf parts of the United States this week.

That's what some weary Americans will have to brace themselves for by Wednesday or Thursday, meteorologists and health experts warn.

The dust plume, drifting from North Africa across the Atlantic to North America, occurs a few times every year, the...

Climate Change, Smog Could Mean More Preemie Babies: Study

Here's more bad news associated with climate change: Pregnant women exposed to air pollution or heat waves face a greater risk of having a preterm or underweight baby, a new research review finds.

The review, of 68 studies from across the United States, found that the large majority arrived at the same conclusion: Babies were at greater risk when their mothers lived in areas with poor...

Doctors' Choice of Anesthesia Could Help Curb Climate Change

Anesthesiologists can help save the planet, a new study suggests.

Increased use of regional anesthesia instead of general anesthesia may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change, according to researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

Unlike general anesthesia, regional anesthesia doesn't use volatile halogenated agents, ...

Dirty City Air Might Raise MS Risk

Air pollution might increase the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS), Italian researchers report.

They found that in places with low levels of tiny particles of air pollution called particulate matter, the risk for MS was lower than in areas where those levels were high. In urban areas, the risk was 29% higher than in rural areas.

"Our findings show that the prevalence of...

Pandemic Has Cut Global Carbon Emissions by 17%

It's not just your imagination -- with everyone avoiding travel, the air is cleaner these days. Daily global carbon emissions fell by about one-sixth during the coronavirus pandemic, researchers say.

But it's not likely to last.

"Population confinement has led to drastic changes in energy use and CO2 emissions. These extreme decreases are likely to be temporary though, as th...

Planet Already Seeing Temperatures Beyond Human Tolerability

Researchers have predicted that if climate change goes unabated, the planet will experience intolerable heat in several decades. But a new study has found that in certain global hot spots, it's already happening.

In recent years, certain regions -- including the Persian Gulf, Indian subcontinent and some Mexican locales -- have recorded off-the-charts combinations of heat and humidity...

Replace That Old Carpet to Shield Your Kids From Toxins

If you have kids and carpets, it might be time to redecorate. Older carpets are a major source of kids' exposure to harmful chemicals known as PFAS, researchers say.

PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are associated with serious health risks in kids and adults, including impaired neurodevelopment, immune system dysfunction, hormone disruption and cancer.

The chemical...

Greenhouse Gases Bad for Your Brain

Rising levels of greenhouse gases may do more than drive climate change, they may eventually impair your thinking, researchers warn.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels tend to be higher indoors than outdoors. As CO2 concentrations increase in the atmosphere, there will be higher levels of the gas indoors, possibly triggering significant declines in people's decision-making skills and strate...

Dirtier Air May Bring More COVID-19 Deaths

Parts of Europe with consistently high levels of air pollution have higher COVID-19 death rates, a new study finds.

The study compared confirmed COVID-19 deaths with air quality data, including satellite readings of nitrogen dioxide air pollution.

Nitrogen dioxide damages the respiratory tract and is known to cause many types of respiratory and heart diseases, according to s...

Nearly Half of Americans Breathe Polluted Air

Almost half of the U.S. population -- 150 million people -- are exposed to air pollution that puts their health at risk, the American Lung Association says.

Climate change is making air pollution worse due to record levels of particle pollution and higher ozone pollution (smog) caused by wildfires. Air pollution poses a threat to everyone, especially children, older adults and people ...

Asthma Sufferers Win When Coal Plants Shut Down

Cuts in air pollution from coal plants translated into a drop in both asthma symptoms and asthma-related hospitalization nearby, researchers report.

Their new study focused on coal-fired plants around the Louisville, Ky., area. The scientists used computer modeling to determine coal plant emission exposure by zip code, and then gathered information about area residents' use of asthma ...

California's Wildfires May Have Fueled Cardiac Arrests

The deadly consequences of wildfires may stretch beyond the people directly in harm's way. Smoke-polluted air may also fuel a spike in cardiac arrests, a new U.S. government study finds.

Looking at the impact of California wildfires in recent years, researchers with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found a clear pattern: As smoke from the fires rolled in, more people fell vict...

Bedroom Air Filters May Help Kids With Asthma Breathe Easier

A bedroom air filter can significantly improve breathing in kids with asthma, new research shows.

The study included 43 children with mild to moderate asthma, and was conducted during a period of moderately high fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution in Shanghai, China.

Particulate matter pollution originates from fossil fuels and can be found in various sizes. PM2.5...

Dirty Air Might Raise Your Odds for Dementia

Smog drives up dementia risk, particularly for older men and women with heart disease, according to a new Swedish study.

For more than a decade, researchers tracked exposure to air pollution and dementia cases among nearly 3,000 Stockholm residents aged 60 and up.

Lead author Dr. Giulia Grande noted that exposure to dirty air has long been linked to an increased risk for lun...

AHA News: Smog May Shorten Life Span for Those with Heart Failure

Study after study has concluded that air pollution could be bad for heart health. For people already living with heart failure, new research shows it may shorten their lives significantly.

Those with heart failure who were exposed to air pollution levels that exceeded federal Environmental Protection Agency standards saw more than three-quarters of a year of life lost, according to a st...

Dirty Air Cuts Millions of Lives Short Worldwide: Study

Worldwide, air pollution may be shortening people's life expectancy by an average of three years, according to new estimates.

Researchers calculate that air pollution actually has a bigger impact on life expectancy than tobacco smoking, HIV/AIDS or violence.

While that might sound surprising, it reflects the ubiquity of air pollution, said study co-author Jos Lelieveld of th...

Air Pollution Made in One State Can Cause Deaths in Others

Deadly air pollution doesn't stop at state borders, researchers warn.

Their analysis of 2005-2018 data on different types of air pollution from a variety of sources showed that half of pollutants generated in one state are carried by winds to affect the health and life span of people in other states.

More than half of early deaths related to air pollution in the United State...

Stricter Clean Air Laws Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year: Study

Daily exposure to ground level ozone increases city residents' risk of early death, researchers warn.

Ground level ozone -- commonly found in cities and suburbs -- forms when pollutants react in sunlight.

New study findings suggest that thousands of ozone-related deaths "could be potentially reduced under stricter air quality standards," according to study co-author Ana Vice...

Even Low Levels of Air Pollution Add to Risk of Cardiac Arrest

All it takes is short-term exposure to fine-particle air pollution from cars and bushfires to increase the risk of cardiac arrest, a new study warns.

The findings underscore the need for tighter worldwide limits on so-called PM2.5 air pollution and development of cleaner energy sources, according to the authors.

"As no boundary exists in air quality among countries, a global...

Brake Dust Another Driver of Air Pollution

Air pollution from brake pads may pose a significant respiratory health risk, British researchers say.

"At this time, the focus on diesel exhaust emissions is completely justified by the scientific literature, but we should not forget, or discount, the importance of other components, such as metals from mechanical abrasion, especially from brakes," said study leader Ian Mudway, of MRC...

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