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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Stroke".

27 May

Having OCD Triples a Person's Odds for Stroke, New Study Finds

Researchers recommend OCD patients maintain a healthy lifestyle to avoid stroke-related risk factors.

Health News Results - 392

Expert Panel Backs Off Recommendation for Aspirin to Prevent Heart Trouble

Most people shouldn't bother taking daily low-dose aspirin to reduce their risk of a first heart attack or stroke, the nation's leading panel of preventive medicine experts announced Tuesday.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued a draft recommendation that essentially backs off its previous advice urging many folks to consider taking low-dose aspirin to prevent heart di...

Clot-Busting Drugs Safe in Stroke Patients When Brain Aneurysm Hasn't Ruptured

Clot-busting drugs may be safe for certain stroke patients with brain aneurysms that haven't ruptured, researchers say.

An aneurysm is a bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. In the new study, patients had suffered an ischemic stroke, which is caused by blocked blood flow in the brain.

Even though clot-busting drugs are the main treatment for ischemic stroke, they're often not give...

Shape, Size of Brain Arteries May Predict Stroke Risk

The size and shape of the blood vessels in your brain may help predict your risk of an often-fatal type of stroke, called an aneurysm, a new study finds.

An aneurysm is a bulge in an artery wall.

"A subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most dangerous type of stroke and occurs when a brain aneurysm leaks or ruptures, causing bleeding into the brain, killing more than 50% of affected peop...

AHA News: Her Husband Died of a Heart Attack, But This Former Nurse Didn't Recognize Her Own

Last October, Katherine Romano was cleaning her house when her neck started to hurt. She kept going, trying to complete her chores, until the pain shifted to her upper back.

"It was so terrible, it took my breath away," she said.

Resting didn't help. The pain moved to her left arm. She began to feel nauseated. The day before, her stomach hurt. She thought it might be diverticulitis....

AHA News: How Black Women Can Take Control of Their Blood Pressure

Black women with high blood pressure may benefit from classes where they learn and practice skills to manage the condition, a small study finds.

In the United States, nearly 58% of Black women have high blood pressure compared to about 41% of white and Hispanic women, according to American Heart Association statistics. For Black women, death rates from high blood pressure-related causes a...

Common Hormone Disorder in Women Costs U.S. $8 Billion a Year

Treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) — the most common hormone disorder in women of child-bearing age — is costly.

In 2020, diagnosing and treating this disorder cost an estimated $8 billion in the United States, according to a new economic a...

Sexual Assault Could Affect a Woman's Long-Term Brain Health

It's known that sexual assault affects a woman's physical and mental health. Now, researchers say these traumatic incidents may also harm her brain health.

A new study found that traumatic experiences, including sexual violence, may be linked to greater risk of dementia, stroke and other brain disorders.

"Identifying early warning signs of stroke and dementia are critical to provid...

Post-Stroke Rehab: There's a Sweet Spot in the Timing

After a stroke, the best time to work on regaining hand and arm use is 60 to 90 days later, according to a new clinical trial.

Starting intensive rehab at less than 30 days can be helpful, too, but waiting until six months can be too late for maximum benefit, said researchers from Georgetown University and MedStar National Rehabilitation Network.

Nearly two-thirds of the 750,000 ind...

Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for Dementia

Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

The new st...

Time Is Brain: Mobile Stroke Units Reduce Disability, Study Finds

Every second counts after having a stroke, and rapid-response mobile stroke units can start clot-busting drugs quickly, potentially staving off lasting damage, new research finds.

Mobile stroke units are special ambulances equipped with imaging equipment and staffed by experts who can diagnose and treat strokes in the moments before arriving at the hospital. Typically, people who may have...

More Affordable Housing, Healthier Hearts?

One of the keys to good health could be in the hands of those who decide zoning policies for their communities.

Inclusionary zoning policies that provide for affordable housing were associated with lower rates of heart disease for those who benefited from these dwellings, according to a new U.S. study.

"Many cities around the country are facing a severe shortage of affordabl...

Vaping Raises Blood Clotting Risks, Harms Small Arteries: Study

Nicotine-laden e-cigarettes raise a user's risk of blood clots, damage small blood vessels and can also raise heart rate and blood pressure, a new study finds.

The effects are similar to those caused by traditional cigarettes, and raise the concern that long-term vaping could help cause heart attacks or strokes, the Swedish research team warned.

"Our results suggest that using e-cig...

Safeguarding Your Heart During, After Hurricane Ida

Along with other dangers, the aftermath of Hurricane Ida could pose significant heart health risks.

Stress and trauma from the storm that slammed into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and other states could increase heart risk, and the impact may be more significant for heart disease and stroke patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

For example, it may be more difficul...

Greener Neighborhoods Bring Healthier Hearts, Study Shows

The greener your neighborhood, the lower your risk of heart disease.

That's the takeaway from a new study, which reported that adding to a neighborhood's green space can have a big payoff for public health.

"For the cost of one emergency room visit for a heart attack, trees could be planted in a neighborhood with 100 residents and potentially prevent ten heart diseases," said study ...

FDA Approves First Nerve-Stimulation Device to Aid Stroke Recovery

A first-of-a-kind nerve stimulation treatment for people who have problems moving their arms after a stroke has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

"People who have lost mobility in their hands and arms due to ischemic stroke are often limited in their treatment options for regaining motor function," explained Dr. Christopher Loftus. He is acting director of the FDA's ...

More Evidence Ties Gum Disease With Heart Disease

New research offers further evidence of a link between gum disease and heart disease.

The ongoing Swedish study previously found that gum disease ("periodontitis") was much more common in first-time heart attack patients than in a group of healthy people.

In this follow-up study, the researchers examined whether gum disease was associated with an increased risk of new heart problems...

Smart Phones, Watches Can Mess With Implanted Pacemakers

Do you have an implanted defibrillator or pacemaker? Try keeping your smart watch or smart phone a few inches away from them.

New research from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration finds that your phone or watch could interfere with implanted heart devices.

Based on the new findings, heart patients and health care providers should be aware of potential risks, the research team...

Heavy Drinking in Youth Could Harm Arteries

The arteries of young people who drink stiffen sooner in their lives, which could increase their risk for heart disease and stroke later on, a British study reports.

People's arteries naturally become less elastic with age, but certain factors -- including alcohol and tobacco use -- can speed up the process. This study included more than 1,600 people in the United Kingdom. Their alcohol u...

Too Much Screen Time Could Raise Your Odds for Stroke

You've heard the warnings about kids who are forever glued to their screens, but all that screen time can have devastating health effects for grown-ups.

If you're under 60, too much time using a computer, watching TV or reading could boost your risk for a stroke, Canadian researchers warn.

"Be aware that very high sedentary time with little time spent on physical activity can have a...

Daily Half-Hour Walk Can Greatly Boost Survival After Stroke

After a stroke, survivors can greatly increase their odds for many more years of life through activities as easy as a half-hour's stroll each day, new research shows.

The nearly five-year-long Canadian study found that stroke survivors who walked or gardened at least three to four hours a week (about 30 minutes a day), cycled at least two to three hours per week, or got an equivalent amou...

Could Women's Health Decline Along With Their Height?

In a study conducted in Scandinavia, loss of height among middle-aged women was linked to an increased risk of early death from heart attack and stroke, researchers report.

Some loss of height goes along with aging, and previous studies have suggested it may boost the odds of death from heart disease.

While women tend to shrink more than men with age, height loss in women has not be...

When Stroke Team Comes to Patients, Outcomes Improve

Dispatching rapid-response medical teams to perform an emergency procedure on stroke patients significantly improves their chances of survival and a good recovery, according to a new study.

Researchers assessed a pilot program in New York City where a mobile interventional stroke team (MIST) raced to ischemic stroke patients to perform a surgical procedure called endovascular thrombectomy...

Women Less Likely to Get Best Care for Deadly Form of Stroke

Women are less likely than men to get the most effective treatment for a serious type of stroke, new research shows.

Emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) is a type of ischemic stroke caused when blockages in large blood vessels cut off significant blood flow to the brain.

The most effective treatment to prevent long-term disabilities from this type of stroke is a minimally invasiv...

Deaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural America

Death rates from Alzheimer's disease are particularly high in the rural United States, a preliminary study finds, highlighting a need for health care resources in traditionally under-served areas.

Researchers discovered that over the past two decades, rural areas in the Southeast have seen the highest death rates from Alzheimer's, at 274 per 100,000 people. That's about twice the rate as ...

Why Strokes Can Affect Women, Men Differently

It is often said that stroke affects men and women differently. Now, scientists say the location of the stroke's damage in the brain may help explain why.

Women have more strokes, and are more likely to have symptoms such as fatigue and mental confusion rather than classic indications such as paralysis. Women also tend to have more severe strokes, according to the authors of a new study.<...

'Moderate' Drinking May Be Heart-Healthy

Here's a reason to not feel guilty about drinking a glass of wine every evening: A new study suggests that people who drink moderately may have lower risks for both heart attack and stroke than teetotalers -- even when they have a history of heart issues.

The researchers found that among over 48,000 people with previous cardiovascular trouble, those who drank the equivalent of a single dr...

Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, hallucinations and psychosis.

About one-third of the stricken kids had symptoms that didn't resolve in the short te...

AHA News: Pregnant Mom's Diet May Influence Baby's Cardiovascular Health

A pregnant woman's diet and other lifestyle factors may change how her baby's genes work in a way that can affect the child's cardiovascular health by age 8 or 9, new research has found.

Nearly half of U.S. adults have some form of cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke and high blood pressure, according to American Heart Association statistics. Ea...

Statin's Health Benefits Far Outweigh  Any Potential Harms: Study

The heart benefits of cholesterol-lowering statins in people without heart disease far exceed the risks of any side effects, a new review finds.

Statins are widely prescribed to people with heart disease, and recent guidelines recommend greater preventive use of the drugs even before heart issues are diagnosed. But it hasn't been clear whether the benefits outweigh the risks in people wit...

Flu Shot Might Help Ward Off Severe COVID

A flu shot might offer some protection against severe effects of COVID-19, a new study suggests.

If you are infected with COVID-19, having had a flu shot makes it less likely you will suffer severe body-wide infection, blood clots, have a stroke or be treated in an intensive care unit, according to the study.

"Our work is important," said study co-author Dr. Devinder Singh, noting l...

Low-Dose Aspirin Cuts Heart Risks in Patients Battling Pneumonia

Aspirin has long been taken by heart patients to reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack, but a new study suggests that it can also guard against cardiovascular trouble in pneumonia patients.

Such complications are common in pneumonia patients and strongly associated with a long-term risk of death.

The study assessed whether aspirin could reduce the risk of heart attack and ische...

Sleep, Exercise & Your Odds for a Long, Healthy Life

Poor quality sleep can shave years off your life, and these effects may be magnified if you don't get enough physical activity.

That's the bad news. The good news is that getting more exercise may help counter some of the health risks known to accompany poor quality sleep, new research shows.

Folks who scored low in both sleep and exercise categories were 57% more likely to die from...

Wealth & Health: How Big Financial Changes Affect Your Heart

The state of your finances may affect more than your pocketbook.

So claims new research that suggests a loss of wealth is associated with an increased risk of heart problems, while a boost in finances is associated with a lower risk.

"Low wealth is a risk factor that can dynamically change over a person's life and can influence a person's cardiovascular health status," said stu...

Weekly Injected Drug Could Boost Outcomes for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes face heightened risks for heart attack and stroke, as well as progressive kidney disease. But a new once-a-week injected drug called efpeglenatide could greatly reduce their odds for those outcomes, new research shows.

The clinical trial was conducted in over 28 nations and involved more than 4,000 patients with type 2 diabetes.

Over two years, patients ...

Clot-Removing Procedure Can Sometimes Backfire for Stroke Patients

When someone suffers a stroke, doctors can often remove the culprit clot obstructing blood flow to the brain. Now, a new study sheds light on why those successful procedures do not always translate into a good outcome.

Researchers found that when clot retrieval takes more than one attempt, stroke patients are more likely to still have some degree of disability three months later.

An...

There Is No 'Healthy Obesity,' Study Finds

There is no such thing as healthy obesity, a Scottish study reports.

A normal metabolic profile doesn't mean an obese person is actually healthy, because he or she still has an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke and respiratory illness, University of Glasgow researchers explained.

"The term 'metabolically healthy obesity' should be avoided in clinical medicine as it i...

'Plant-Based' or Low-Fat Diet: Which Is Better for Your Heart?

Hoping to eat your way to a healthier heart?

Diets rich in plant foods may beat low-fat eating regimens for cutting the risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

Saturated fat, the kind largely found in animal products, has long been viewed as the enemy of the heart, since it can raise "bad" LDL cholesterol.

In the new study, which tracked more than 5,100 Americans,...

His Implanted Microchip Could Help Save Him From a Stroke

Norman Mayer, 86, walks around with a computer chip in his chest and doesn't think a thing about it.

Doctors implanted a tiny heart monitor chip in Mayer's chest after he suffered a mini-stroke in late 2015, to track his heartbeat and potentially detect an irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation (a-fib).

"You don't even know it's there," said Mayer, the sitting mayor of th...

Many Heart Disease Patients Keep Smoking, Despite Knowing Risks

Smoking cigarettes or using other tobacco products increases heart risks, but that doesn't stop some Americans with a history of heart problems, new research finds.

Many continue to smoke after having a heart attack, heart failure or stroke even though they are aware of the risk.

Nearly 30% of adults with a history of these heart problems smoked when a five-year study began in 2013....

ER Visits for Heart Attacks Rebounded After Pandemic Decline

Emergency care for heart attacks and strokes rebounded in Northern California after initially plummeting in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

That's good news, suggesting that public health campaigns urging people to seek care if they had signs or symptoms of a stroke or heart attack were effective, according to the Kaiser Permanente researchers.

For the s...

Strokes Hitting COVID Patients Are More Severe: Study

COVID-19 patients are at increased risk for severe strokes, according to a new study that also found that the overall risk of stroke is higher in younger patients.

Researchers analyzed data from 432 COVID-19 patients in 17 countries who suffered strokes and found they were more likely to have large vessel occlusion (LVO) than stroke patients in the general population.

LVO strokes ar...

Mom's Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Could Affect Child's Stroke Risk Decades Later

Expectant mothers' high blood pressure heightens kids' risk of stroke later in life, a Swedish study finds.

"Our findings indicate that hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are associated with increased risks of stroke and potentially heart disease in offspring up to the age of 41 years," said study author Fen Yang, a doctoral student at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

The stu...

Having OCD May Triple a Person's Odds for a Stroke

Adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder, a common mental health condition known as OCD, may have more than triple the risk of having a stroke, according to a new report from Taiwanese researchers.

As to why, the study authors aren't sure.

The investigators speculate that other mental health problems suffered by OCD patients - "comorbidities" such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorde...

Birth Order, Family Size May Affect Heart Health

It's known that genetics and lifestyle can affect your heart health. Now, researchers say, your birth order and family size may also have an impact.

A new Swedish study found that first-born children had a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes than their younger brothers and sisters. But having many siblings was associated with...

Fat Around Your Heart Could Be Especially Deadly

Too much fat around your heart could increase your risk of heart failure, especially if you're a woman, researchers warn.

They looked at nearly 7,000 45- to 84-year-olds across the United States who had no evidence of heart disease on initial CT scans. Over more than 17 years of followup, nearly 400 developed heart failure.

High amounts of fat around the heart -- pericardial fat -- ...

Surgical Snip Might Prevent Stroke in People With A-fib

A simple surgery may help lower the risk for strokes by more than a third in patients with atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, a new trial finds.

The reduction in stroke risk is achieved by blocking the left atrial appendage, an unused, finger-like tissue that traps blood in the upper chamber of the heart and increases the risk of clots that can cause strokes, the researche...

Obesity in Teens, Higher Risk of Stroke Before 50

Strokes are on the rise among people younger than 50, and new research suggests that packing on the pounds during the teen years is a big reason why.

The more overweight you were from ages 16 to 20, the greater your risk of having a stroke before age 50, the new study shows.

"Given ongoing trends of adolescents who are overweight and obese in the U.S., Israel and other Western count...

Most Severe COVID Cases Involve Neuro Issues, and They're More Often Fatal

Neurological problems are occurring in a very high percentage of hospitalized COVID-19 patients -- and what's worse, those symptoms foretell a bad end for many sufferers, a new study finds.

About four out of five people sick enough to be hospitalized for COVID-19 suffer some sort of neurological problem, ranging from headache and a loss of sense of smell to confusion, delirium, stroke a...

Breathing Other People's Smoke Can Raise Your Odds for Heart Failure

Exposure to secondhand smoke may up your odds for heart failure, a new study warns.

Researchers analyzed nationwide survey data from more than 11,000 nonsmokers (average age: 48) who were followed from 1988 to 1994. Nearly 1 in 5 had lab test evidence of exposure to secondhand smoke.

Nonsmokers with recent exposure were 35% more likely to develop heart failure than those with none, ...

'Prediabetes' Raises Odds for Heart Attack, Stroke

Prediabetes -- where blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes -- is not something you should dismiss.

It significantly increases the risk of heart attack, stroke and other serious heart problems, new research shows.

The findings highlight the need for health care providers and patients to prevent prediabetes, according to authors of the s...

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