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Results for search "Brain".

23 Apr

Your Diet and Dementia Risk

Certain food combinations may be bad for the brain, new study finds.

27 Jan

Is A Bigger Brain Better?

Brain size doesn't always matter when it comes to aging and memory.

05 Nov

Short Bouts of Exercise May Help Save Your Memory

Just minutes of physical activity a day can protect your brain as you age.

Health News Results - 326

Under 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May Rise

Need fresh motivation to lose some weight? New research suggests that young adults who are overweight or obese face a higher risk for dementia in their golden years.

For the study, the researchers looked at just over 5,100 older adults who were involved in two long-term studies. The investigators found that women who were overweight between 20 and 49 years of age had nearly twice the ...

Mastering the Violin Won't Help Your Child Master Math: Study

All the parents who force their children to play an instrument because it has been touted as a way to boost overall intelligence, take note.

New research now suggests that it may not help develop memory, math, reading and writing skills after all.

Earlier studies trying to pinpoint the value of music training on cognitive and academic performance have been conflicting, the r...

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's: Study

First responders to the 9/11 terrorist attacks appear to be at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia, new research suggests.

The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild thinking impairments among them is well-known, and now two studies from Stony Brook University in New York have identified changes in their brains similar to those in dementia patient...

Smoking Raises Aneurysm Risk for Women

Smoking significantly increases a woman's risk of potentially deadly brain aneurysms, a new study warns.

An aneurysm is a weakened, bulging section of an artery. If an aneurysm ruptures, it can cause fatal bleeding.

The study included 545 women, aged 30 to 60, who had brain scans at five large teaching and research hospitals in the United States and Canada between 2016 and 2...

What Puts You at High Risk of Midlife Mental Decline?

Your thinking skills may be at risk of declining in midlife if you smoke or have high blood pressure or diabetes, a new study suggests.

Heart disease risk factors -- especially high blood pressure and diabetes -- have become more common in midlife, the study authors noted.

"We found those two risk factors, as well as smoking, are associated with higher odds of having accel...

Will Your Brain Stay Sharp Into Your 90s? Certain Factors Are Key

Some people in their 90s stay sharp whether their brain harbors amyloid protein plaques -- a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease -- or not, but why?

That's the question researchers sought answers for among 100 people without dementia, average age 92, who were followed for up to 14 years. Their answer? A combination of genetic luck and a healthy, fulfilling lifestyle.

"The vast ...

Researchers Zero in on Alzheimer's Disease Risk Factors

Ten risk factors may affect your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new Chinese study suggests.

Focusing on these factors could help doctors develop guidelines for preventing Alzheimer's, researchers say. The risk factors include mental activity, obesity in late life, depression, diabetes and high blood pressure.

The need is urgent: Alzheimer's is the most common fo...

Check Early and Often for Glaucoma

Regular eye checks are crucial for people with early-stage glaucoma, a new study shows.

Glaucoma is a condition in which the optic nerve that connects the eye to the brain becomes damaged. It develops slowly and affects peripheral vision first. Untreated glaucoma leads to permanent vision loss.

Glaucoma makes it harder to see contrast -- the differences between shades of lig...

Smog Harms Women's Brains, But One Food May Help Buffer the Damage

Dirty air is the curse of urban living, and studies have shown that breathing it in harms the brains of men and women alike.

But a new study suggests that diet can help reverse the damage: Older women who regularly ate fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids seemed to better withstand the neurological effects of smog.

"Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to fight inflammation and m...

As People Age, They Share Fewer Memories With Others: Study

The older people get, the less likely they are to share memories, researchers say.

And when they do reminisce, older folks don't offer as much detail as younger adults do, new study findings show.

Over four days, University of Arizona researchers used a smartphone app to record random bits of conversations as 102 mentally healthy 65- to 90-year-olds went about their daily li...

Terrifying Delirium Can Strike Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients

Intense breathing problems may be the most widely reported feature of COVID-19, but new research warns that coronavirus can also take aim at the brain.

Infection can trigger serious nerve damage, stroke, inflammation and even wild bouts of delirium.

In fact, a bizarre array of delusions plagued nearly a quarter of the 43 British COVID patients whose cases are detailed in a n...

Blood Test May Reveal Concussion Severity With Accuracy of Spinal Tap

A simple blood test may predict the severity of a concussion as accurately as an invasive spinal tap, researchers report.

They focused on a biomarker called neurofilament light chain. This nerve protein can be detected in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid when nerve cells are injured or die, according to the study.

"When your brain is injured, neurofilament light chain leve...

Zika May Have Damaged More Infants' Brains Than Expected

It's a virus some might not even remember, but babies born to mothers infected with Zika who appeared normal at birth still experienced neurological or developmental problems, new research suggests.

A hallmark of infection with the mosquito-borne Zika virus in pregnant women is delivering a baby with an abnormally small head -- a condition called microcephaly. But as children exposed ...

Deep Brain Stimulation May Slow Parkinson's, Study Finds

Data from a five-year clinical trial is adding to growing evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can slow the ravages of Parkinson's disease.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., said that the therapy appears to curb any worsening of tremor and other symptoms, as well as lessening a patient's need for medications.

"Parkinson's is relen...

Brain's Iron Stores May Be Key to Alzheimer's

The progression of Alzheimer's disease may accelerate as iron deposits build up in the brain, a new study finds, hinting at a possible role for the mineral in mental decline.

Using MRI scans of 200 older adults with and without Alzheimer's, researchers found that those with the disease generally had higher iron levels in various parts of the brain. And 17 months later, Alzheimer's pat...

A Drink or Two a Day Might Be Good for Your Brain: Study

Love a glass of wine with dinner? There's good news for you from a study that finds "moderate" alcohol consumption -- a glass or two per day -- might actually preserve your memory and thinking skills.

This held true for both men and women, the researchers said.

There was one caveat, however: The study of nearly 20,000 Americans tracked for an average of nine years found tha...

Hormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in Women

Women have more Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain than men, and this may be linked to hormonal disruptions at menopause, researchers say.

"About two-thirds of people living with Alzheimer's are women, and the general thinking has been it's because women tend to live longer," said study author Lisa Mosconi of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.

"Our findin...

Stroke, Confusion: COVID-19 Often Impacts the Brain, Study Shows

Patients with severe COVID-19 may be at risk for a variety of brain complications -- from stroke to psychosis, new research suggests.

"There have been growing reports of an association between COVID-19 infection and possible neurological or psychiatric complications, but until now these have typically been limited to studies of 10 patients or fewer," said lead study author Benedict Mi...

Middle-Age Obesity Linked to Higher Odds for Dementia

If you've been looking for a good reason to slim down, consider this: Being obese at midlife appears to increase your odds for dementia.

That's the takeaway from a large study just published by British researchers, and it echoes similar findings published in December.

Dorina Cadar, lead researcher on the new study, said the goal is to identify risk factors that are influence...

One-Time Treatment Eases Parkinson's -- in Mice

In findings that could pave the way to a new treatment for Parkinson's disease, scientists have figured out how to spur the production of new brain cells in mice.

The advance centers on a protein found in various cells in mice and humans. Researchers found that blocking it in the mouse brain caused certain "support cells" there to transform into specialized neurons that produce the ch...

Don't Be a 'Hot-Head': Study Suggests Head Overheating Impairs Thinking

Can working or playing in the hot sun "fry" your brain?

Yes, claims a new, small study that found too much heat on the head hampered thinking in volunteers.

Most people know that high temperatures can cause heat exhaustion or heat stroke as the body's core temperature becomes dangerously high, but the beating sun can affect your brain even if your body temperature stays norm...

COVID-19 Brings New Challenges to Alzheimer's Caregiving

Caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease comes with daily challenges and disruptions, and those have only increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the risk of infection, contact with your loved one may now be off-limits or severely restricted. Caregivers probably need to wear masks, which may be confusing to someone with Alzheimer's. And, if your loved one gets sick, how do ...

5 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

A combination of healthy habits -- such as a good diet and regular exercise -- may lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease by as much as 60%, a new study suggests.

Data from nearly 3,000 people in the United States was scored on five beneficial lifestyle factors: high-quality diet, physical activity, not smoking, brain-challenging activities, and light-to-moderate alcohol consumpti...

Even Without Concussion, Athletes' Brains Can Change After Head Jolts: Study

Athletes who play contact sports may develop subtle brain changes -- even if they don't suffer a concussion, researchers say.

Their study involved 101 female college athletes -- 70 who played rugby and 31 who either rowed or swam. All were concussion-free six months before and during the study.

Some rugby players had suffered a concussion before that time, while the rowers a...

HIV Can Travel From the Brain, Animal Study Suggests

HIV can reside in brain cells and spread the AIDS-causing virus to the body, a new study in mice indicates.

It's known that HIV enters the brain within eight days of infection, but less is known about whether HIV-infected brain cells can release HIV that can then infect other tissues.

This new work from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that certain types of ...

Wristband 'Zapper' Might Help Calm Tourette Syndrome

A wristband that zaps a key nerve may help quell the uncontrollable tics of Tourette syndrome, according to British researchers.

"We think we've come up with a safe and effective piece of technology that we believe is relatively cheap that will give control over tics to people with Tourette syndrome," said lead researcher Stephen Jackson, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the ...

Maria Shriver and AARP Take on Alzheimer's in Women

An Alzheimer's diagnosis is devastating, no matter your sex. But the disease strikes far more women than men.

Journalist and author Maria Shriver is determined to help researchers figure out why women make up two-thirds of those with Alzheimer's disease. And why certain races and ethnicities are harder hit, too.

"Some of the biggest research challenges in terms of gender d...

Mindfulness May Ease the Emotional Burden of MS

Mindfulness training may help counter the thinking and emotional difficulties caused by multiple sclerosis.

In a small test study, people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had four weeks of mindfulness training emerged with better emotional control and faster thinking.

Multiple sclerosis is a disease in which the immune system attacks the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves....

Healthier Heart, Better Brain in Old Age

Preventing heart disease may protect you from dementia, researchers say.

The new study looked at nearly 1,600 people, at an average age of 79.5, who were followed for 21 years. Their heart disease risk was assessed at the outset, and participants had annual memory and thinking tests.

The takeaway: People with a higher risk of heart disease also had greater mental (cognitive)...

Even One High-Fat Meal May Dull Your Mind

Ordering a cheeseburger and fries might literally be a dumb move, new research suggests.

A recent, small study from Ohio State University indicates eating a single meal high in saturated fats may hamper your ability to mentally focus.

Saturated fats are found in red meat, dairy products and tropical oils, including coconut and palm. They can raise cholesterol and clog arter...

Get Moving, Seniors: It's Good For Your Brain

Want to give your brain a boost? Go for a swim, take a walk, or spin your partner on the living room floor.

A new study finds that aerobic exercise can improve older adults' thinking and memory, even if they're longtime couch potatoes.

This type of exercise increases blood flow to the brain and counters the effects of normal aging, according to the study published online May...

Type 2 Diabetes Linked to Worse Mental Outcomes After Stroke

Memory and thinking skills are generally worse after a stroke for people with type 2 diabetes compared to people with normal blood sugar levels or prediabetes, new research suggests.

"We found that diabetes, but not prediabetes, is associated with poorer cognitive performance in every aspect of cognition tested," said study lead author Jessica Lo. She's a research associate from the ...

Sudden Obsessions, Tantrums: What Is PANS in Kids?

Researchers may have gained new insights into a mystifying condition that causes children's behavior to change so severely and abruptly, it can be like they woke up as a different person.

The condition is known as pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome, or PANS. It is diagnosed when a child has a dramatic -- sometimes overnight -- onset of psychiatric and neurological symptom...

Zika Virus Tied to Profound Developmental Delays

Toddlers with congenital Zika syndrome have severe developmental delays, researchers report.

In a study that covered a five-year period, researchers found that children in Brazil with congenital Zika syndrome who had microcephaly at birth suffered severe mental delays.

Microcephaly is a condition in which the head is smaller than normal. Its severity was the only significa...

Baby's Sleep Issues Could Sometimes Signal Autism: Study

Babies who have disrupted sleep, as many with autism do, may experience delayed brain development, a new study suggests.

Sleep problems in baby's first year may affect growth of the hippocampus and may also precede an autism diagnosis, researchers say.

In the study of 400 6- to 12-month-old infants, the investigators found that those diagnosed with autism were more likely ...

First Good Evidence That Brain Hits 'Replay' While You Sleep

If you've ever wondered what your brain is doing while you sleep, a new study gives the first direct evidence that it's busy "replaying" our waking experiences.

The finding comes from a research project called BrainGate, which is testing new technology for people who are paralyzed or have lost a limb. Participants have "micro-electrodes" implanted in their brains, to allow them to exe...

Key Areas of the Brain Triggered in Recent Heart Attack Survivors

People who've recently had a heart attack show increased activity in the area of the brain involved in stress and emotions. And this is associated with elevated inflammation in arteries, a small, preliminary study finds.

"The results of this study advance our understanding of the interconnections among the brain, bone marrow and blood vessels," said study lead author Dr. Dong Oh Kang,...

Cuddling Brings Two Minds Together, MRI Study Reveals

Love to cuddle up? It might bring a 'mind meld,' too, new research shows.

People in close physical contact appear to have synchronized brain patterns, a revolutionary new MRI technique has revealed.

A functional MRI scan of two people cuddling under a blanket showed that their brains appeared to be falling into similar patterns of action and response, as they took turns gent...

Some NFL Players May Be Misdiagnosed With Brain Disease: Study

The brain damage that may occur in football players has received a lot of attention in recent years. But a new study suggests that former players who get a diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) when they're still alive may well be getting the wrong diagnosis.

CTE can only be diagnosed with an autopsy, the researchers explained. Other conditions could cause the symptoms ...

Greenhouse Gases Bad for Your Brain

Rising levels of greenhouse gases may do more than drive climate change, they may eventually impair your thinking, researchers warn.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels tend to be higher indoors than outdoors. As CO2 concentrations increase in the atmosphere, there will be higher levels of the gas indoors, possibly triggering significant declines in people's decision-making skills and strate...

Screen Time for Tiniest Tots Linked to Autism-Like Symptoms

Letting a baby watch a smartphone, tablet or TV at 12 months increases the odds the child will develop autism-like symptoms during the next year, new research suggests.

On the other hand, if parents spent active play time with their child every day, the odds of autism-like symptoms decreased.

"At 12 months, watching TV or DVDs was associated with more autism symptoms a...

Blood Pressure Spikes at Night May Spell Trouble for Brain

Nighttime high blood pressure could harm the brain, a new study says.

Most people's blood pressure goes down during the night, which is called dipping. But in some people, it stays the same or even rises -- called reverse dipping.

Folks with high blood pressure and reverse dipping may be at increased risk for vascular damage in the brain and associated memory problems, accor...

Long Periods in Space Alter Astronauts' Brains

Long periods of time in space may cause brain volume increases in astronauts, new research shows.

Extended periods in space have long been known to cause vision problems. And more than half of International Space Station crew members have reported vision changes.

Increased pressure inside the head might contribute to vision problems, scientists have suggested.

To l...

Brain Plaques Signal Alzheimer's Even Before Other Symptoms Emerge: Study

Even before symptoms develop, the brains of people with early Alzheimer's disease have high levels of amyloid protein plaques, a new study reveals.

Those levels in older adults with no dementia symptoms are associated with a family history of disease, lower scores on thinking/memory tests, and declines in daily mental function.

The first findings from the so-called A4 study ...

Brain, Nervous System Affected in 1 in 3 Cases of Severe COVID-19

A study out of China finds that strokes, altered consciousness and other neurological issues are relatively common in more serious cases of COVID-19.

Looking at 214 cases of severe coronavirus illness treated in Wuhan city during the early phase of the global pandemic, doctors reported that 36.4% of patients displayed neurological symptoms.

Sometimes these symptoms appe...

Magnetic Brain 'Zap' Shows Promise Against Severe Depression

Intensifying a standard form of brain stimulation may bring relief to people with hard-to-treat depression, a preliminary study suggests.

The study involved just 21 patients, but the treatment sent 90% into remission within a few days. That's a success rate that has never been seen in early testing of other therapies for severe depression, the researchers said.

The thera...

How Ritalin Works in the Brain

A new study dispels a common belief about how stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall work in the brain.

The drugs are usually prescribed to people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but are sometimes used by otherwise healthy people to boost their thinking.

Many assume these drugs improve focus, but researchers found that they actually get the brain to e...

Dirty Air Might Raise Your Odds for Dementia

Smog drives up dementia risk, particularly for older men and women with heart disease, according to a new Swedish study.

For more than a decade, researchers tracked exposure to air pollution and dementia cases among nearly 3,000 Stockholm residents aged 60 and up.

Lead author Dr. Giulia Grande noted that exposure to dirty air has long been linked to an increased risk for lun...

Daily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study Finds

Millions of Americans pop a low-dose aspirin each day to help ward off heart issues, but a new study finds that protection may not extend to dementia.

Although the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin have been touted as protection against thinking and memory (or "cognitive") problems from Alzheimer's and other dementias, a large, randomized trial suggests aspirin won't slow mental de...

Could Sleep Apnea Put You at Risk for Alzheimer's?

New research out of France suggests that untreated sleep apnea could raise your odds for developing Alzheimer's disease.

Evidence linking the two is based on a series of neurological assessments, brain scans and sleep analyses conducted between 2016 and 2018.

"This is further support of Alzheimer's as a lifestyle chronic condition that results from a lifetime of experiences,...

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