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Results for search "Dementia".

Health News Results - 209

Keeping Weight Stable Could Help Save Your Brain

TUESDAY, Jan. 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Older adults who maintain a steady weight as they age are less likely to experience rapid cognitive decline, regardless of how much they weigh to start, new research suggests.

“There’s something about maintaining weight and BMI that seems to reflect some health resilience,” said study author Michal Schnaider Beeri, a professor of ...

Cleaner Air Could Mean Healthier Brains for Older Women

Everyone knows cleaner air means healthier bodies, but new research suggests it might also help aging minds.

"Our study is important because it is one of the first to show that reducing air pollution over time may benefit the brain health of older women by decreasing their likelihood of developing dementia," said...

Scientists Work Out How Exercise Saves Your Brain

Exercise helps you stay fit, hale and hearty, and researchers say it may also help you stave off dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Now they have a better understanding of the hidden benefits that aid the brain.

Older folks who are more physically active have higher levels of a protein that promotes better communication between the brain's synapses, a new study reports.

"Synapses are...

Make 2022 Your Year for a Free Memory Screening

When it comes to routine health screenings, resolve to include a memory assessment in 2022.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America offers routine screenings that are both virtual and free every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

The process is quick, taking about 10 to 15 minutes. It includes a series of questions meant to gauge memory, language, thinking skills and other intellectual ...

More U.S. Seniors, Especially Women, Are Retaining Healthy Brains: Study

The percentage of older Americans reporting serious problems with memory and thinking has declined in recent years -- and higher education levels may be part of the reason, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2008 and 2017, the proportion of older U.S. adults reporting...

Toxins in Wildfire Smoke May Make Their Way Into Brain

The smoke from wildfires is dangerous for your lungs, but tiny particles from the smoke can also enter your brain and cause lifelong neurological issues, a new animal study suggests.

Once that happens, the particles may put people at risk for everything from premature aging and various forms of dementia to depression and even psychosis, researchers say.

"These are fires that are com...

Cataract Surgery Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

People who undergo surgery to treat cataracts may have a lower likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Of more than 3,000 older adults with the eye disease, those who had surgery were about 30% less likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the coming years, researchers found.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 7, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • Could Viagra Help Prevent Alzheimer's?

    Viagra, a drug long used to treat erectile dysfunction, may double as a potential weapon against Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Looking at data on more than 7 million Americans, researchers found that those taking the drug were 69% less likely to develop Alzheimer's, when compared to non-users.

    Then, in lab experiments, the investigators showed that the medication seeme...

    High Heart Rate Linked to Dementia Risk

    Checking older adults' resting heart rate could help identify those who are more likely to experience a decline in mental function, a Swedish study suggests.

    The researchers found that a high resting heart rate was associated with a greater risk of dementia.

    "We believe it would be valuable to explore if resting heart rate could identify patients with high dementia risk," said lead ...

    Lifetime Spent With Epilepsy Ages the Brain, Study Finds

    People with a longtime history of epilepsy show signs of rapid brain aging that may raise their odds for developing dementia down the road.

    This is the key finding of new research reporting that the brains of people with epilepsy that began in childhood appear to be about 10 years older than the brains of people without a history of this seizure disorder.

    Individuals with epilepsy w...

    Clearing Out Clutter Might Not Help People With Dementia

    You might think de-cluttering would make it easier for people with dementia to do daily tasks. Not so, says a new study from the United Kingdom.

    "It is generally assumed that a person with dementia will be better able to carry out daily tasks when their home space is tidy and clutter-free," said Eneida Mioshi, a professor in the School of Health Sciences at University of East Anglia (UEA)...

    'Mild Cognitive Impairment' in Older Age Often Disappears, Study Finds

    A diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) might worry an older adult, who could see it as a stepping stone to dementia. But a new study suggests one does not necessarily lead to the other.

    In fact, nearly half of seniors tracked in the study -- all of who had been diagnosed with issues in memory and thinking and received an MCI diagnosis -- no longer had the condition a few years lat...

    Could Coffee Help Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's?

    Coffee lovers know a steaming cup of java can quickly deliver energy and mental clarity every morning, but new research suggests it may also guard against Alzheimer's disease in the long run.

    "Worldwide, a high proportion of adults drink coffee every day, making it one of the most popular beverages consumed," said lead researcher Samantha Gardener, a post-doctoral research fellow at Edith...

    More Years Playing Football, More Brain Lesions on MRI: Study

    Repetitive head hits are common in football, and they're also linked to debilitating brain injuries.

    But rendering a definitive diagnosis typically means waiting for autopsy results after the player has died.

    Now, a new study suggests that brain scans can reliably spot troubling signs of sports-inflicted neurological damage while a person is still alive.

    The research also show...

    Low-Dose Aspirin Won't Affect Dementia Risk in People With Diabetes

    Low-dose aspirin neither reduces nor increases the risk of dementia in adults with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds.

    "This is reassuring that an increase in the risk of dementia is unlikely for the millions of people worldwide who regularly take aspirin to protect against the risk of heart attack and stroke," according to study author Jane Armitage, of the University of Oxford in Englan...

    Reminder Apps on Smartphones May Help in Early Dementia

    Despite stereotypes about seniors and technology, a small study suggests that older adults in the early stages of dementia can use smartphone apps as memory aids.

    The researchers found that older people with mild impairments in memory and thinking were not only able to learn how to use the apps, they said the digital aids made their daily lives easier.

    The apps were not specially de...

    Could Coffee or Tea Lower Your Odds for Dementia and Stroke?

    A few cups of your favorite brew -- coffee or tea -- each day might help keep stroke and dementia at bay, a large new study suggests.

    For close to 14 years, scientists stacked up coffee and tea consumption against the risk of stroke and dementia among nearly 366,000 healthy Brits between 50 and 74 years of age.

    The researchers -- led by Yuan Zhang of Tianjin Medical University in Ti...

    Alzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social Life

    Alzheimer's is a devastating disease, slowly robbing patients of their memories and even their sense of selves.

    Now, new research shows it also robs sufferers of a healthy social life.

    "Social relationships are an essential feature of our quality of life and can buffer against cognitive decline," said study co-author Addam Reynolds, a doctoral candidate at the Rutgers School of Soci...

    Many People May Be Eating Their Way to Dementia

    Eating lots of fruits, veggies, beans and other foods with inflammation-cooling properties may lower your odds of developing dementia as you age.

    But, if your diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory foods, you may be up to three times more likely to experience memory loss and issues with language, problem-solving and other thinking skills as you age, new research suggests.

    "A less infl...

    Could Estrogen Help Shield Women's Brains From Alzheimer's?

    A key to reduced Alzheimer's disease risk in women could be how much of the hormone estrogen they're able to stockpile over the years, new research suggests.

    Certain lifetime choices — such as having more children, taking hormonal birth control or taking hormone therapy during menopause — mean that a woman has greater cumulative exposure to estrogen during her lifetime. A longer ...

    Fish on Your Plate May Keep Your Brain Sharp

    Older folks who eat fish a couple of times a week may be doing their brains a favor.

    New research suggests that fish, even in moderate amounts, helps stave off vascular disease that may ultimately lead to dementia.

    "Previous studies, including work from our team in France and others in the U.S., reported protective associations of eating fish against cognitive decline and risk of de...

    Purrfect Pal: Robotic Cats May Help People With Dementia

    If you have a pet, you know that the excited wag of your dog's tail or the satisfied purr of your cat curling up on your lap can be a mood booster.

    But what if that pet is a robot? And what if its owner has dementia?

    In a small study, researchers at Florida Atlantic University found that engaging with a robotic pet might help people with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia, re...

    Could Breastfeeding Help Women Keep Their Smarts as They Age?

    Might breastfeeding affect a new mother's future brain health?

    That's the intriguing question posed by a new study that flips the narrative from the often-touted benefits for baby to what impact breastfeeding might hold for Mom years later.

    Researchers from UCLA Health found that women over age 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on tests of brain function than those ...

    Right Amount of Sleep May Be Important in Early Alzheimer's

    Getting the right amount of sleep — not too much and not too little — could reduce your risk of mental decline as you age, even if you have early Alzheimer's disease, a new study claims.

    Poor sleep and Alzheimer's disease are both associated with thinking ("cognitive") declines, but separating out the effects of each has been a challenge.

    This new study included 100 older adults...

    How 1.3 Million Americans Became Controlled by Conservatorships

    Pop singer Britney Spears was at the height of her fame in 2008 when, through a series of arcane legal maneuverings, her father gained conservatorship over her and took control of her personal and financial affairs.

    Spears' plight and the #FreeBritney movement has shone a bright spotlight on America's guardianship system, which experts say is shrouded in secrecy, ripe for abuse and in des...

    Depression in Early Life May Up Dementia Risk Later

    Happy young adults may be somewhat protected from dementia, but the reverse may be true, too: If you're a depressed young adult, your odds for dementia rise, a new study suggests.

    "Generally, we found that the greater the depressive symptoms, the lower the cognition and the faster the rates of decline," researcher Wil...

    Signs of Early Alzheimer's May Be Spotted in Brain Stem

    Certain changes in a part of the brain stem, visible in scans, might be a potential early indicator of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Using different brain imaging techniques, researchers found that lesser "integrity" in the brain stem region was linked to a faster decline in memory and thinking in older adults, as well as certain brain changes seen in early Alzheimer's.

    Sexual Assault Could Affect a Woman's Long-Term Brain Health

    It's known that sexual assault affects a woman's physical and mental health. Now, researchers say these traumatic incidents may also harm her brain health.

    A new study found that traumatic experiences, including sexual violence, may be linked to greater risk of dementia, stroke and other brain disorders.

    "Identifying early warning signs of stroke and dementia are critical to providi...

    Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for Dementia

    Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

    Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

    The new stu...

    Could Cholesterol Help Drive Alzheimer's Disease?

    Cholesterol made in the brain may spur development of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Cholesterol made by cells called astrocytes is needed for controlling production of amyloid beta, a sticky protein that builds up in the brain and accumulates into the plaques that are the tell-tale sign of Alzheimer's.

    Researchers say these new findings may offer insight into how and wh...

    Most Alzheimer's Patients Wouldn't Have Qualified for Controversial Drug's Trial: Study

    U.S. approval of the Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm is already mired in controversy. Now a new study finds that most Alzheimer's patients could not have taken part in clinical trials that led to the green light.

    In June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave accelerated approval to Aduhelm (aducanumab) for treating patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia from Alzheimer's d...

    Diets That Lower Brain Iron Could Keep You Sharp

    Older adults who regularly eat foods like fish, nuts and olive oil may have less iron accumulation in their brains, as well as sharper memories, a small study suggests.

    The brain requires a certain level of iron to function normally, but the aging brain can accumulate an excess amount. And that excess iron has been linked to cognitive decline — a slow deterioration in memory and thinkin...

    Could Traffic Noise Raise Your Odds for Dementia?

    It's more than just an annoyance: Long-term exposure to traffic and train noise may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, Danish researchers report.

    The study authors said that more than 1,200 of Denmark's nearly 8,500 cases of dementia in 2017 may have resulted from exposure to noise, which means that reducing traffic noise might help prevent the thinking, memory and beh...

    Postponing Retirement Might Help Keep Dementia at Bay

    Early retirement may sound appealing, but a recent study hints that putting it off a few years might help older adults retain more of their mental sharpness.

    Using data on more than 20,000 older Americans, researchers estimated that if all of those people waited until age 67 to retire, their collective cognitive health would benefit.

    "Cognition" refers to a person's ability to think...

    A Mentally Challenging Job Could Help Ward Off Dementia

    While every worker would prefer a fun, mentally stimulating job, new research reveals an added bonus: Such work could help prevent dementia in old age.

    On-the-job intellectual stimulation appears to lower levels of certain proteins that block brain cells from forming new connections -- and doing so could help prevent or postpone dementia, the study's authors said.

    "This is an import...

    Some Diabetes Meds Might Also Lower Alzheimer's Risk

    Older adults who take certain diabetes drugs may see a slower decline in their memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    Researchers in South Korea found that among older people who'd been having memory issues, those using diabetes drugs called DDP-4 inhibitors typically showed a slower progression in those symptoms over the next few years. That was compared with both diabetes-fre...

    Dirty Air, Higher Dementia Risk?

    It's long been know that polluted can damage the heart and lungs, but new research finds that it's bad for your brain, too.

    A long-term study by a Seattle team linked exposure to higher levels of fine particulate air pollution to an increased risk of dementia.

    "We found that an increase of 1 microgram per cubic meter of exposure corresponded to a 16% greater hazard of all-cause dem...

    Could COVID-19 Accelerate Alzheimer's Symptoms?

    COVID-19 can kill you. It can rob you of your breath, cause strange blood clots, and prompt side effects that last for months after you're over the initial infection.

    It's also possible that COVID-19 might impact the human brain in ways that could promote the onset of Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports.

    Severely ill COVID-19 patients display biological evidence of brain injury...

    Want to Avoid Dementia? Add Some Color to Your Plate

    Something as simple as having a glass of orange juice in the morning or an apple at lunch could be one of the keys to protecting your brain health.

    People who consumed just a half serving a day of foods high in a naturally occurring compound called flavonoids had a 20% lower risk of mental decline, according to a new study.

    "We think it may have important public health i...

    Loneliness Raises Opioid Dangers in Seniors: Study

    Illustrating a heartbreaking cycle, new research finds that lonely seniors are much more likely to take opioid painkillers, sedatives, anti-anxiety drugs and other medications.

    This puts them at increased risk for drug dependency, attention problems, falls, accidents and mental decline, the University of California, San Francisco researchers warned.

    "There's a misconception that as ...

    Dementia Cases Will Nearly Triple Worldwide by 2050: Study

    The global total of people living with dementia will rise nearly three-fold by 2050, researchers say.

    Cases are projected to increase from an estimated 57.4 million in 2019 to an estimated 152.8 million in 2050, driven mainly by population growth and aging.

    This "emphasizes the vital need for research focused on the discovery of disease-modifying treatments and effective low-cost in...

    'Light Flash' Treatment Might Help Slow Alzheimer's

    While efforts to develop Alzheimer's medications have so far borne little fruit, new research highlights the therapeutic promise of two non-drug tools: light and sound.

    According to a pair of small new studies, exposing Alzheimer's patients to an hour a day of carefully modulated light and/or sound appears, over time, to slow down the telltale brain degeneration that typifies disease prog...

    Cleaning Up the Air Could Help Prevent Alzheimer's

    Air pollution causes you to gasp and wheeze. Smog puts strain on your hearts and inflames your lungs.

    Could dirty air also be costing you your brain health?

    A trio of new studies finds that air quality appears linked to a risk of thinking declines and dementia, and bad air might even promote toxic brain proteins that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

    "This is extremely ex...

    Doctors Divided Over Use of Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

    The controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm is creating something of a civil war in medicine, as health networks, hospitals, insurers and individual doctors weigh impending discussions with patients about whether they should take the medication.

    Many doctors believe the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "moved the goalposts" to approve Aduhelm (aducanumab) in early June, and they aren'...

    Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

    A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

    The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson's.

    The new study, published July 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine, ...

    1 in 20 Cases of Dementia Occurs in People Under 65

    Dementia is largely a disease of old age, but a new study finds that up to 5% of all cases are among people in the prime of their lives.

    Looking at 95 international studies, researchers estimated that nearly 4 million people worldwide are living with young-onset dementia -- cases that strike between the ages of 30 and 64.

    In the United States, an estimated 175,000 people have the co...

    Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?

    Women on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause go on to have a 58% lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, a new study finds.

    Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause and effect, the findings could point the way to new treatments for such diseases, according to the researchers.

    "This is not the first study on the impact of hormone...

    How Long Do People Want to Live?

    What's better -- a long life or quality of life?

    New research suggests that people balance both when thinking about their desired life span, and fears of suffering dementia or chronic pain in old age tend to limit how long they want to live.

    "Dementia tops the list of conditions where people would prefer to live shorter lives -- which is a particular challenge given the rapid incr...

    Two Major Health Systems Won't Administer Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

    Two major U.S. health systems say they will not administer the controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm.

    The decisions by the Cleveland Clinic and Mount Sinai's Health System in New York City are the latest fallout from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's widely criticized approval of the Biogen drug on June 7, The New York Times reported.

    Many experts say there's no ...

    Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: Study

    An active mind in old age may delay Alzheimer's disease by up to five years, a new study suggests.

    Activities like reading, writing letters, playing cards or doing puzzles may prolong brain health even for those in their 80s, researchers say.

    "The key element is that you're processing information," said lead researcher Robert Wilson, a professor in the neurological sciences departme...

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