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Results for search "Cancer: Misc.".

Health News Results - 596

Doubt Over Long-Term Use of Hormone Rx for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Running contrary to current guidelines, new research suggests that use of hormone-suppressing treatment over the long term may not help some men battling recurrent prostate cancer, and may even cause harm.

In fact, the study found that long-term hormone therapy was tied to a raised risk of death from other causes for some patients who receiv...

At-Risk Men May Also Benefit From Regular Mammograms

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography has saved hundreds of thousands of lives by detecting breast cancer early in women.

Could such regular X-ray screening also help men?

A new study argues there's potential benefit in regular mammograms for men who are at high risk of breast cancer.

Mammography accurately detected dozens of cases of breast cancer in n...

High-Dose Radiation a Game Changer in Fighting Deadly Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what might be a major breakthrough, researchers report that high doses of radiation dramatically prolonged survival in men battling an advanced and aggressive form of prostate cancer.

This particular type of cancer occurs when tumors resurface and spread to a number of areas beyond the prostate among patients who were in remission follow...

Scientists Find Unsafe Levels of Known Carcinogen in Menthol E-Cigarettes

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As doctors race to determine what is causing sudden and severe lung illnesses among some vapers, new research discovers dangerously high levels of a known carcinogen in menthol-flavored electronic cigarettes.

The chemical (pulegone) is used as a menthol and mint flavoring, even though it was recently banned in foods, the researchers said.

...

Where Women's Health Clinics Close, Cervical Cancer Outcomes Worsen

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As government funding dried up and many women's health clinics across America closed, cervical cancer screening rates fell and deaths from the disease rose, a new report shows.

Nearly 100 women's health clinics in the United States closed between 2010 and 2013, researchers said -- often due to the passage of more restrictive laws or the loss ...

Most Americans in the Dark About Cancer-Causing HPV, Survey Finds

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans aged 18 to 26, two-thirds of men and one-third of women still do not know that the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of cervical cancer, a new survey finds.

The survey findings also showed that more than 70% of American adults don't know that the common sexually transmitted infection can cause anal, penile an...

Lung Cancer Screening Can Detect Other Smoking Ills

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- CT lung cancer screening can detect other serious smoking-related conditions, such as heart disease, osteoporosis and emphysema, researchers say.

Medical experts consider lung cancer screening an effective way to detect malignant tumors at earlier, more treatable stages. Now, new research suggests low-dose CT scans of the lungs could also i...

What Is Your Risk for Prostate Cancer?

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men, so it's important to know the risk factors and warning signs, an expert says.

The American Cancer Society estimates there will be nearly 175,000 new prostate cancer cases in the United States this year and over 31,000 deaths. One in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate ca...

Cancer Drugs Sometimes Work in Unexpected Ways: Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ten cancer drugs being tested in human clinical trials appear to work -- but not in the ways their developers thought they would, researchers say.

"The idea for many of these drugs is that they block the function of a certain protein in cancer cells. And what we showed is that most of these drugs don't work by blocking the function of the...

Would a Health Warning on Every Cigarette Help Smokers Quit?

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Health warnings on individual cigarettes could be a more powerful way to coax smokers to quit than warnings on packages, British researchers say.

They assessed the reactions of 120 smokers, 16 and older, to the warning "Smoking kills" printed on individual cigarettes.

Smokers said the warnings could potentially work.

They...

Study Points to Herd Immunity Against HPV in Unvaccinated U.S. Adults

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The United States could be approaching a state of herd immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus linked to several cancers.

Oral HPV infections declined by 37% among unvaccinated 18- to 59-year-old men between 2009 and 2016, according to a Sept. 10 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

That in...

Cancer Patients Turning to Crowdfunding to Help Pay Medical Costs

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer takes a huge emotional toll on patients, but a new study finds the financial costs are also so high that many are resorting to crowdfunding to help pay their medical bills and related costs.

"The financial consequences of cancer care for patients and their families are substantial," said senior and corresponding author Dr. Benjamin Br...

PTSD a Risk Factor for Ovarian Cancer?

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may make a woman more vulnerable to ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from a national study of nearly 55,000 U.S. women and concluded that those who'd had six to seven symptoms of PTSD -- such as being easily startled by common noises or avoiding reminders of...

Colon Cancer Rates Rising Among the Young in Wealthy Nations

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Colon cancer rates among young adults are on the rise in the United States, Canada and seven other wealthy nations, even though rates among older adults are down or stable, a new study finds.

The researchers analyzed data for 36 countries and found that over the past 10 years, colon cancer rates among people under age 50 were stable in 14 co...

Paperwork, High Costs Could Mean Worse Survival for Lung Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors can help certain patients with advanced lung cancer live longer and better. But high out-of-pocket costs might stand in the way, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that of 106 patients who started tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for advanced lung cancer, one-quarter with the highest out-o...

Cancer Overtakes Heart Disease as #1 Killer of Middle-Aged in Wealthy Nations

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease still claims the lives of more people globally, but in more affluent nations it has now ceded its place as the leading killer to cancer, a major new report finds.

Around the world, 40% of all deaths are caused by heart disease, making it the number one global killer. That means that of the estimated 55 million people who die...

Major Study Gives Women More Guidance on Hormone Therapy During Menopause

THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive hormone therapy to help ease menopausal symptoms have an increased risk of breast cancer, which can persist long after they stop the therapy, a new study confirms.

The new review -- which included data from 58 studies involving nearly 109,000 women from around the world -- is the latest chapter in the ongoing story of these...

Exercise Is Good Medicine for Advanced Colon Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Waging a successful battle against advanced colon cancer should include regular doses of exercise, a new study suggests.

It found that physical activity was associated with slower cancer progression and reductions in severe treatment side effects in more than 1,200 patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Exercise -- even low-intensity a...

Can Breast Cancer Be a Risk Factor for Opioid Use Among Older Patients?

TUESDAY, Aug. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dealing with breast cancer is tough, and the depression and anxiety that can come with the diagnosis can up the risk of using opioids while lowering survival rates in older women, a new study finds.

Previous research suggests that about 40% of breast cancer patients have some type of mental health diagnosis.

In this study, resea...

Childhood Cancer Survivors Struggle With Heart Troubles

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The treatments that childhood cancer patients receive often save their lives, but they also make survivors prone to heart troubles, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers examined heart disease rates in nearly 7,300 childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed at an average age of 7) and a "control group" of more than 36,000 people without can...

Staying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study Shows

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An upbeat view of life may increase your odds for living to a ripe old age, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a look at optimism and longevity among nearly 70,000 women and 1,400 men. It builds on earlier research linking higher levels of optimism to lower risks of chronic illness and premature death.

"This study took us...

Vaping May Trigger Lung Damage Like That Seen in Emphysema

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The health profile of vaping just took another knock: New research suggests that e-cigarettes can cause the same lung changes that lead to emphysema in smokers.

Researchers tested lung fluid from 41 people -- nonsmokers, smokers and people who vape -- and found that the lungs of both smokers and vapers had elevated levels of protease enzymes, ...

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Treated for Pancreatic Cancer

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has just finished treatment for pancreatic cancer, the U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday.

After the tumor was first diagnosed in late July, Ginsburg was given a three-week course of focused radiation at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, the court said in a statement. A bile duct stent was pl...

HPV Vaccination Rate in U.S. Girls Has Stalled

THURSDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- While there's been a slight uptick in the number of American boys who get the HPV vaccine to help prevent certain cancers, a new study finds there's been almost no increase for girls.

And overall, too few kids are getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (Gardasil, Cervarix), which can help provide them with a lifetime of protection against ...

Drug Offers Hope Against a Tough-to-Treat Blood Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a form of blood cancer known as multiple myeloma who haven't responded to other therapies might have a new weapon against the disease, researchers say.

A drug called selinexor appeared to help patients with the blood and bone marrow cancer, according to a clinical trial involving 122 people.

"This study proved that a...

More Antibiotics, Higher Odds for Colon Cancer?

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking certain antibiotics -- especially multiple times or for long courses -- may put you at risk for colon cancer, a large new study suggests.

The researchers found that as people's antibiotic use increased, their odds of being diagnosed with colon cancer inched up. Specifically, the risk was tied to antibiotics that kill anaerobic bacter...

U.S. Task Force Updates Breast Cancer Gene Testing Recommendations

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in two genes -- BRCA1 and BRCA2 -- are known to significantly increase the risk of breast cancer, but experts have long debated which women should be tested for them.

New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) may help clarify who can benefit most from a risk assessment test. Now, if a woman has a hig...

New Treatments Could Be Powerful Weapons Against Brain Tumors

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New therapies are showing real promise in fighting the type of brain cancer that claimed the lives of Sens. John McCain and Ted Kennedy, a pair of new clinical trials shows.

One experimental treatment injects powerful genes directly into a brain tumor, and then uses pills to turn the genes on and off. That way, the genes can attack the canc...

America's Obesity Epidemic May Mean Some Cancers Are Striking Sooner

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Since the turn of the century, American obesity rates have skyrocketed. And now a new study indicates that as the nation's waistlines expand, cancers long linked to obesity are striking the middle-aged more than ever before.

The finding follows a review of data on more than 6 million white, black and Hispanic cancer patients diagnosed betwe...

Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Might Harm the Heart: Study

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When men have both advanced prostate cancer and heart disease, treatment may pose a dilemma: Newer hormonal therapies that can slow the cancer down might also be risky for their hearts, a new study finds.

Once prostate cancer spreads beyond the gland, one of the mainstays of treatment is hormone therapy. The aim is to prevent androgens ("male...

Caring Doctors Can Be Life-Changing for Diabetic Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A kind, understanding doctor could spell the difference between life or death for diabetes patients, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that patients had a lower risk of early death if their primary care doctor exhibited empathy.

The study included 628 patients in the U.K. with type 2 diabetes. A year after their diagnos...

New Study Finds a Family Risk for Blood Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If a close relative has had blood cancer, you're more likely to get it, a large new study reports.

The researchers analyzed data from 16 million people in Sweden, including more than 153,000 diagnosed with blood cancer and more than 391,000 of their first-degree relatives: parents, siblings or children.

Patients with a family link ...

New DNA Blood Test May Help Guide Breast Cancer Treatment

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could the DNA from a patient's breast tumor help doctors spot whether stray cancer cells are still in her blood?

That's what a small, new study suggests is possible. If the findings are replicated in a larger study, such a test might help determine whether a treatment is working or not. It also has the potential to reduce unnecessary additio...

Red Meat May Raise Breast Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Skipping that grilled T-bone and having chicken instead could reduce a woman's risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

The World Health Organization has declared red meat a probable carcinogen, and this new study adds breast cancer to a list of cancers linked to red meat, including beef, veal, pork, lamb and some game.

Breast...

Despite Cancer Screening, 'Oldest Old' Have Low Survival Odds: Study

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The oldest Americans have higher cancer screening rates but lower cancer survival rates than younger seniors, a new report shows.

Those 85 and older -- a group dubbed the oldest old -- are also less likely to have cancer surgery than their counterparts between 65 and 84 years of age.

Adults aged 85 and up are the fastest-growing ag...

Routine Screening for Pancreatic Cancer Not Warranted, Expert Panel Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's nothing to be gained by screening for pancreatic cancer in people with no signs or symptoms of the lethal tumor, according to an influential U.S. panel of experts.

Looking over the accumulated data on the subject, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on Tuesday reaffirmed its prior recommendation against routine screening f...

New Moms Can Save a Life By Donating Cord Blood

MONDAY, Aug. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women should keep in mind that donating their umbilical cord blood could save lives, a clinical cell therapy expert says.

Cord blood is the blood collected from the umbilical cord and placenta after the birth of a healthy baby, said Fabio Triolo. He is director of the Cellular Therapy Core laboratories at University of Texas Health Sci...

Finances Affect Women's Choice of Breast Cancer Treatment: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cost often influences breast cancer patients' decisions about surgery, even if they have good incomes and insurance, a new study finds.

"Eligible women with early-stage breast cancer often have choices for surgical treatments that are equally effective and result in excellent cancer outcomes," said lead study author Dr. Rachel Greenup. She is a...

Drug Duo May Be an Advance Against a Common Leukemia

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A two-drug combo helps patients with a common form of leukemia survive longer than the current standard of care, a new clinical trial finds.

The phase 3 trial of more than 500 U.S. patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) found that a combination of rituximab and ibrutinib extended patient survival.

Specifically, 89.4%...

Vitamin A Linked to Lower Odds of Common Skin Cancer

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Wondering if you can do more than slap on some sunscreen to prevent skin cancer? A new study suggests that getting more vitamin A may help.

The study of around 125,000 Americans found that people with the highest intake of vitamin A lowered their risk of squamous cell skin cancer by around 15%. Most of the vitamin A they consumed came...

Childhood Cancer Steals Over 11 Million Years of Healthy Life: Study

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are closing in on the toll of childhood cancer, finding it stole 11.5 million years of healthy life lost worldwide in 2017.

Premature death took 97% of that toll, and impaired quality of life about 3%, the study found.

"Estimating the years of healthy life children have lost due to cancer allows policy makers to ...

Some of Most Common, Deadly Cancers Get the Least Research Money

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many of the most common or deadliest cancers receive the least research funding from nonprofits, a new study finds.

"The goal of this study is not to divert funds away from cancers that are well-supported, but rather expand funding for other cancers that aren't getting enough support currently," said corresponding author Dr. Suneel Kamath.<...

Breast Implants Tied to Rare Cancer Recalled

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Allergan's textured breast implants will be recalled due to their link to a rare cancer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

Following a request from the FDA, the company will proceed with a worldwide recall of its Biocell textured breast implant products, the agency said.

The recall stems from concerns abou...

Pregnant Women Exposed to More Risky CT Scans

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Use of risky CT scans during pregnancy has risen significantly in North America in the past two decades, a new study finds.

"It's important to quantify exposure to ionizing radiation because it can cause cancer and birth defects, and should be kept to a minimum, especially during pregnancy," said co-lead author Marilyn Kwan. She's a senior ...

New Test Can Pinpoint Which Pancreatic Cysts Might Turn Cancerous

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- To have surgery or not to have surgery? That is the big question for hundreds of thousands of Americans diagnosed each year with a pancreatic cyst.

The dilemma? While cysts are very common, most will not actually lead to cancer. But for doctors, determining which will from which won't is often a shot in the dark. So many patients undergo a ...

Can a Broken Heart Contribute to Cancer?

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Broken heart syndrome" may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests.

While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive their cancer five years after ...

Hurricanes Can Hurt Survival Odds Among Those With Cancer

TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a hurricane strikes, as tropical storm Barry did this weekend in Louisiana, most people worry about the immediate health dangers such a storm poses.

But new research suggests that the interruptions in radiation therapy caused by power outages may also lower the chances of long-term survival among lung cancer patients.

"While w...

Newer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More Lives

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A newer form of lung cancer screening may mean fewer deaths from the disease, a new study contends.

Using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) instead of X-rays helped reduce lung cancer deaths in current and former smokers, the study authors said.

"Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and early detection and t...

Is an Elusive U.S. Total Ban on Asbestos Finally in Sight?

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new U.S. government rule on asbestos is at best a toothless measure against the cancer-causing material, critics charge.

The rule, laid out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), went into effect in June. The agency says it was designed to strengthen decades-old public health protections.

But two former government off...

Sugary Sodas, Juices Tied to Higher Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's long been known that sugary drinks help people pack on unwanted pounds. But new research suggests that sweetened sodas, sports drinks and even 100% fruit juice might raise your risk for some cancers.

The study couldn't prove cause and effect, but it found that drinking as little as 3 to 4 ounces of sugary drinks each day was tied ...

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