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Results for search "Depression".

29 Oct

Medical Marijuana and Mental Health Disorders

There's limited evidence that compounds found in marijuana ease symptoms of depression, anxiety and other conditions.

10 Oct

Battling Depression With Healthy Foods

Young adults with depression may significantly improve their mood by eating more veggies, fruits and whole grains ... and less fat and sugar.

27 Feb

Work Hours And Mental Health

Women who work extra-long hours face increased risk of depression.

Health News Results - 200

Exercise Can Help Prevent Depression, Even for Those at High Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

But that was less likely for...

Are You Lonely? Your Tweets Offer Important Clues, Experts Say

MONDAY, Nov. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Analyzing people's tweets could reveal if they're lonely, researchers say.

Loneliness -- which has been linked with depression, heart disease, dementia and other health problems -- affects about 1 in 5 adults in the United States.

Researchers analyzed public accounts of Twitter users in Pennsylvania and identified more than 6,200 who ...

ADHD Rates Doubled Among U.S. Adults Over 10 Years

FRIDAY, Nov. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If the latest statistics are any indication, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is no longer an issue for children only.

Over a 10-year period, ADHD rates more than doubled among American adults, new research shows.

However, the rate among children remains much higher than in adults.

"While we can't pinpoint the...

Stressed Out? Maybe Not If You're a Narcissist

TUESDAY, Oct. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you have an overinflated sense of your own importance? Do you feel that you're better than everyone else, and have next to no shame about it?

If so, you'd probably be pegged as a "grandiose narcissist" and considered the most obnoxious person in the room.

But three British studies now suggest that some amount of narcissism may no...

It May Be Even Tougher for Women to Quit Smoking Than Men

TUESDAY, Oct. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is a notoriously tough habit to quit, but a new study suggests it is far harder for women to stop than it is for men.

Why? The researchers point to a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression in women, which might interfere with even the best intentions to kick the habit. And one expert noted that prior evidence has shown that women...

Can Medical Pot Ease Mental Ills? Study Says Probably Not

MONDAY, Oct. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People struggling with anxiety, depression or other psychiatric problems shouldn't pin their hopes on medical marijuana, a new review suggests.

Dozens of studies involving more than 3,000 people did not provide compelling evidence that medical cannabis can help treat disorders of the mind, the review authors concluded.

"Cannabinoids ...

What Works Best to Treat Depression?

MONDAY, Oct. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Talk therapy" for depression may cost more than medication initially, but in the long run, both may have a similar payoff, a new study finds.

The study estimated the cost-effectiveness of the two treatments. It found that over one year, antidepressants offered more value for the money. But when the researchers looked at the five-year picture...

Depression Rates Not Budging for Lesbian and Gay Teens

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While fewer straight teens suffer depression than did two decades ago, the same cannot be said for lesbian, gay and bisexual teens.

For those teens, depression risk remains much higher than among their straight peers, new research shows, and it is not following a similar downward trend.

Each year between 1999 and 2017, Massac...

Deaths Due to Suicide, Homicide on the Rise Among U.S. Youth

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The anger and fear seething throughout the United States could be having a fatal impact on some of the nation's youngest citizens.

More teens and young adults are coming to a violent end in recent years, either at their own hand or another's, new federal data show.

Both suicide and homicide death rates are rising among 10- to 24-ye...

PTSD Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke in Younger Adults

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young and middle-aged adults with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have an increased risk of stroke, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed medical data from more than 1 million veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. They ranged in age from 18 to 60 years and two-thirds were white.

Of those, 29% h...

Stress in Pregnancy May Affect Baby's Sex, Preterm Delivery Risk: Study

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Physical and mental stress during pregnancy may influence the baby's sex, and physical stress may increase the risk of preterm birth, a new study suggests.

Researchers assessed 187 healthy pregnant women between 18 and 45 years of age. About 17% were mentally stressed, with high levels of depression, anxiety and perceived stress. Sixtee...

Depression, Anxiety Can Dampen Efforts to Recover From a Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Recovering from a heart attack can be tough, but new research suggests that depression, anxiety and stress can make it even tougher.

"Anxiety may lead to fear of another cardiac event and stop people from being active," said study author Angela Rao, from the University of Technology Sydney in Australia. "Depression and anxiety can also impa...

Could Eating Healthier Be a Natural Antidepressant?

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids have long heard the refrain: Eat your vegetables to grow up big and strong. But a healthy diet may make you happier, too, according to Australian researchers.

That was the effect eating healthier had in a small study of young adults with poor diets and moderate-to-high symptoms of depression. Those who embraced healthier food choices r...

Gender Reassignment Surgery Does Bring Mental Health Benefits

MONDAY, Oct. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender men and women who undergo gender reassignment surgery are much less likely to need mental health services later, new research suggests.

The researchers, Richard Branstrom and John Pachankis of the Yale School of Public Health, said the finding "lends support to the decision to provide gender-affirming surgeries to transgender indiv...

For Insomniacs, Sleep Aids Can Ease a Troubled Mind

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with severe insomnia may find that a sedative helps them sleep and banishes thoughts of suicide, a new study suggests.

"If you have a patient who complains that their sleep has taken a turn for the worse, then there is reason to open the door to a question about suicide," said corresponding author Dr. W. Vaughn McCall. He's chairman o...

Seaside Living Soothes the Mind of Rich and Poor Alike

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could living near the coast be an inexpensive balm for mental troubles?

"Our research suggests, for the first time, that people in poorer households living close to the coast experience fewer symptoms of mental health disorders," said researcher Dr. Jo Garrett, from the University of Exeter, in England.

"When it comes to mental heal...

How to Wait Out a Blue Mood

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Feel bad about feeling bad? Don't.

Studies done at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that acknowledging a blue mood -- and not berating yourself for it -- can help you work through it more easily.

It turns out that accepting negative emotions is better for your long-term mental health than constantly passing judgment...

For Kids With Asthma, Depression Makes ER Visit More Likely

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that anxiety and depression can make it hard for some kids to manage their asthma.

Young patients with all three conditions ended up in the emergency room nearly twice as often as kids who only struggle with asthma, the study found.

"Asthma self-management is complex, requiring recognition of symptoms, adheren...

Depressed Moms, More Anxious, Troubled Kids?

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If a mother is depressed, her young children might be at risk for hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety, a new study suggests.

Interestingly, a father's depression only affected kids if mom was also depressed, the researchers found.

"Depression among parents both during and after pregnancy not only affects the person suffering f...

Why You Should Ask to Be Screened for Postpartum Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's not uncommon for new moms to feel an emotional letdown shortly after baby is born. Though symptoms of these so-called "baby blues" can be wide-ranging, they last no more than two weeks and go away on their own.

Some Signs of the Baby Blues:

  • Mood swings
  • Feeling sad or overwhelmed
  • Being unable ...

Mental Ills May Put Veterans at Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Veterans who suffer from depression, anxiety, psychosis or bipolar disorder are more likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or die from heart disease, a new study finds.

Those who have most severe mental health problems, such as schizophrenia, are at greatest risk.

Although it's unclear how mental problems affect heart disease r...

Common Antidepressants May Work in Unexpected Way: Study

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people who take the antidepressant Zoloft report feeling better. But new research suggests the drug may be treating their anxiety, rather than their depression, at least in the early weeks.

Zoloft (sertraline) -- and the family of similar drugs it belongs to -- may actually take months to ease classic symptoms of depression, U.K. researc...

Youngest in Classroom Diagnosed More Often With ADHD, Other Problems

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If a child can't sit still or blurts out random thoughts in kindergarten or first grade, does the child have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Or is the youngster just not mature enough to sit still yet?

Both are possibilities, and whichever might be true, new research suggests that the youngest kids in class are being diagnose...

Sick Americans Turning to Medical Pot for Help

FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans use marijuana to help them cope with an illness than just to get high, a new study finds.

Nearly 46% of those who use pot say they do so because of a medical condition, compared with 22% who say they use marijuana for recreation.

And only 36% of those with a medical problem say they use pot to get high, c...

Four-Legged Friends Help Buffer Loss of a Spouse

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of a loved one is one of life's most stressful events. But new research suggests that having a furry loved one still at home may help ease the pain.

Investigators looked at 437 older adults, some of whom lost a spouse, either through divorce or death. They found that having a cat or dog at home was linked to an easing of lonelin...

Hysterectomy Tied to Depression, Anxiety

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a hysterectomy can be a traumatic experience, and new research now shows it may also increase the long-term risk for depression and anxiety.

"Our study shows that removing the uterus may have more effect on physical and mental health than previously thought," said senior author Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, an ob-gyn at the Mayo Clini...

Vets With Traumatic Brain Injury Have Higher Suicide Risk: Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of suicide among U.S. military veterans who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is more than double that of other vets, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed records of more than 1.4 million vets who received care from the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) between 2005 and 2015.

They compared severity ...

Lots of Time on Social Media Linked to Anxiety, Depression in Teens

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who spend more time with social media are more likely to suffer from social withdrawal, anxiety or depression, a new study says.

Twelve- to 15-year-olds who spent more than six hours a day on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and other social media were nearly three times more likely to have these types of "internalizing" mental health issu...

Nurturing Childhood Boosts Odds of a Happy Adult Life: Study

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who grow up confident that their parents, friends and community have their back are far less likely to struggle with depression or other serious mental health issues as adults, new research indicates.

The survey of nearly 6,200 adults also found that bad experiences, such as emotional or physical abuse, don't inevitably doom kids to a dif...

Experimental Drug Works Quickly on Major Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressants typically take four to eight weeks to ease the debilitating symptoms of depression, but an early clinical trial found a new type of drug brought relief in just two weeks.

"SAGE-217, once fully developed, has potential to offer relatively quick and clinically meaningful alleviation of depressive symptoms in patients with mode...

For NFL Players, Career Length, Role Affect Future Health Risks: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pro football players who had long careers at key positions are more likely to have concussion-related problems such as confusion, memory loss, depression and anxiety, a new study finds.

In a survey of nearly 3,500 former NFL players (average age 53), 1 in 8 (12%) reported serious cognitive problems. That compares to about 2% of the gen...

Jumps in Pot Use, Depression and Drinking Threaten Gains Against Smoking

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pot. Alcohol. Depression.

This trio of factors is on the increase in former smokers and ups the risk of relapse, undermining decades of gains made in the effort to help Americans kick the habit, a new study suggests.

"Because previous research has demonstrated that these factors put former smokers at greater risk of relapsing with...

Staying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study Shows

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An upbeat view of life may increase your odds for living to a ripe old age, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a look at optimism and longevity among nearly 70,000 women and 1,400 men. It builds on earlier research linking higher levels of optimism to lower risks of chronic illness and premature death.

"This study took us...

Restless Legs Syndrome Might Raise Risk of Suicide, Self-Harm

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with restless legs syndrome (RLS) have nearly three times the risk of suicide and self-harm, which indicates that there may be a link between the physical condition and mental health.

In a new study, Penn State researchers analyzed data on more than 24,000 people with RLS and about 145,000 people without the neurological condition. None...

Mixing Marijuana With Opioids May Not Be Good for Mental Health

THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As America continues to struggle with an opioid epidemic, marijuana has been suggested by some as a safer alternative to opioid painkillers. But taking the two together may leave users vulnerable to mental health issues, a new study finds.

Not only that, researchers found that those who combined pot and opioids for pain were also more likely...

Could Dirty Air Spur a Rise in Serious Mental Illness?

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As air quality declines, the prevalence of mental health conditions may rise, a large, new study suggests.

Looking at data on millions of people in the United States and Denmark, researchers found correlations between air pollution exposure and rates of certain psychiatric disorders. In both countries, poorer air quality was linked to a sligh...

Exercise Your Blues Away

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise is good medicine for depression, researchers report.

"The evidence of the use of physical activity and exercise for the management of depression is substantial and growing fast," said study authors Felipe Barretto Schuch, from Federal University of Santa Maria in Brazil, and Brendon Stubbs, from King's College London.

"Despi...

For Heart Patients, CPAP Treatment May Ease Depression: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea can ease depression in people with heart disease, according to a groundbreaking new study.

"Patients who have had a stroke or heart attack are prone to suffer from low mood and are two to three times more likely to develop clinical depression, which then further el...

Higher Risk of Mental Health Problems for Transgender College Students: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender college students are two to four times more likely than their classmates to have mental health problems, researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 1,200 gender-minority students on 71 U.S. campuses who took part in an annual nationwide survey. Gender-minority means their gender identity differs from the sex assigned to the...

Nearly Half of U.S. Patients Keep Vital Secrets From Their Doctors

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of U.S. patients don't tell their physicians about potentially life-threatening risks such as domestic violence, sexual assault, depression or thoughts of suicide, a new study finds.

"For physicians to achieve your best health, they need to know what you are struggling with," said study senior author Angela Fagerlin.

U...

Depression, Alzheimer's Might Be Part of Same Process in Some Aging Brains: Study

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research is untangling the complex relationship between symptoms of depression and losses in memory and thinking that often emerge together with Alzheimer's disease.

In fact, the new data suggests that "depression symptoms themselves may be among the early changes in the preclinical stages of dementia syndromes," explained study lead autho...

Don't Sweat It: Hyperhydrosis Can Be Treated

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's nothing more embarrassing than sweating profusely in public places, yet one expert says many people suffer through the humiliation for decades.

At least 15 million people in the U.S. have excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). Yet, half of people with the condition delay the many e...

Too Much Smartphone Time May Invite Host of Health Woes

TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With most people never far from their cellphones, new research on college students finds that "problematic" use is tied to a variety of mental health problems, as well as lower grades and more sexual partners.

The study, which surveyed more than 3,400 students in the United States, also found that alcohol misuse was markedly higher in those w...

Too Much Social Media a Depression Risk for Teens

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too much social media might be too much for the mental well-being of teenagers, new research suggests.

The more that teens used social media and watched television, the greater their risk of depression, the study found.

"Our research reveals that increased time spent using some forms of digital media in a given year predicts depressi...

Easing Depression Can Bring Longer Life to People With Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Treating depression may have an added benefit for people with diabetes -- longer life.

A large new study from Taiwan found that antidepressants cut the risk of dying during the study period by more than one-third for people with diabetes and depression.

"The first nationwide population-based study showed antidepressant use was as...

How Are You Feeling? Check Your Wristband

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Remember the "mood ring" craze of the 1970s?

A high-tech wristband is being developed along the same lines, potentially helping patients who struggle with mood disorders.

The smart wristband would use a person's skin to track their emotional intensity. During a mood swing, either high or low, the wristband would change color, heat up,...

Is Your Child Depressed or Suicidal? Here Are the Warning Signs

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents think it couldn't happen to their kids, but the number of children and teens admitted to children's hospitals for thoughts of self-harm or suicide is alarming.

Each year 4,600 young people between the ages of 10 and 24 take their own lives, and 157,000 are treated in emergency departments for self-inflicted injuries, according t...

How Much Work Brings Happiness? Not Much, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a job can be a boon to mental well-being, but for many of us, it only takes one day of work per week, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 70,000 adults in the United Kingdom, found that when unemployed people found a job, their mental health typically improved. But, on average, it only took eight hours of work per week -- w...

Drug Overdoses, Suicide Are Risk for New Mothers: Study

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drug overdoses and suicide are common causes of death among women who die within a year of giving birth, a new study finds.

In fact, in the study based on data from California, these two causes accounted for nearly 20% of postpartum deaths from 2010 to 2012.

"These deaths are rare but devastating for families," said study co-au...

Why Do Young Women Get Addicted to Indoor Tanning?

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of depression and genetic risk may fuel an addiction to indoor tanning.

That's the conclusion of a new study out of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C.

For the study, researchers surveyed nearly 300 women who used indoor tanning beds, sunlamps or sun booths, and analyzed DNA samples. Th...

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