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Results for search "Depression".

Health News Results - 263

Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

MONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way — live and in-person — will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the s...

Lockdown Loneliness Making Things Even Tougher for Cancer Patients

Fighting cancer can be a lonely battle, and new research shows that the coronavirus pandemic has made the experience even more isolating.

Studies conducted before the pandemic found that 32% to 47% of cancer patients were lonely, but in late May of 2020 roughly 53% of 606 cancer patients reported loneliness.

Those who were lonely had higher rates of social isolation and more severe ...

State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

Poor mental health after a heart attack may increase young and middle-aged adults' risk of another heart attack or death a few years later, a new study suggests.

The study included 283 heart attack survivors, aged 18 to 61 with an average age of 51, who completed questionnaires that assessed depression, anxiety, anger, stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within six months of ...

Time Spent in ICU Linked to Higher Odds for Suicide Later

Survivors of the intensive care unit (ICU) have a higher risk of self-harm and suicide after discharge than other hospital patients, a Canadian study shows.

Researchers compared the health records of 423,000 ICU survivors in the province of Ontario with those of with 3 million patients who were hospitalized but not in intensive care between 2009 and 2017.

Compared to others, ICU sur...

Stressed, Burned-Out Nurses Make More Medical Errors: Study

Critical care nurses with poor mental and physical health are more likely to make mistakes, but a more supportive work environment could improve the situation, a new study suggests.

"It's critically important that we understand some of the root causes that lead to those errors and do everything we can to prevent them," said lead author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of the College of Nursing at ...

Good Stroke Recovery May Depend on Your ZIP Code: Study

Stroke recovery tends to be worse among Americans in poorer neighborhoods than those in wealthier neighborhoods, a new study finds.

"People in less advantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have more disability, lower quality of life and more symptoms of depression than people in more advantaged neighborhoods," said study author Lynda Lisabeth, from the University of Michigan in Ann Ar...

Nothing to Sniff at: Depression Common for People With COVID-Linked Smell Loss

TUESDAY, April 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Loss of the sense of smell and taste is often an early and enduring symptom of COVID-19. Now, research suggests that for many COVID survivors with long-term sensory loss, it's also depressing.

In a web-based survey completed by 322 adults with COVID and a sudden change in smell or taste, 56% reported decreased enjoyment in li...

Worry, Depression Can Plague Folks Who Get Implanted Defibrillators

An implanted heart defibrillator is a life changer in more ways than one. More than one in 10 patients who receive the device also developed anxiety or depression, a new study reveals.

The findings highlight the need for regular screening of patients who receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in order to identity those who may require additional mental health support, acc...

Pandemic Is Leading to More Depression for Pregnant Women Worldwide: Study

Depression and other mental health problems have become much more common among pregnant women and new mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic, an international study finds.

Researchers noted that mental health issues can harm not only a woman's own health but also affect mother-infant bonding and children's health over time.

"We expected to see an increase in the proportion of pregnant...

Could Chronic Sinusitis Affect Brain Health?

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As if the headaches and stuffy nose aren't bad enough, chronic sinus trouble often leaves patients foggy-headed and depressed. Now, new research suggests one possible reason why: Sinusitis may trigger changes in brain activity.

"Chronic sinusitis is incredibly common," said study lead author Dr. Aria Jafari. Upwards of 11% ...

Pandemic Stress Keeps Many From Exercising

Exercise can provide a much-needed mental health boost during the COVID-19 pandemic. But stress and anxiety may hold you back, new research suggests.

According to a survey by researchers at McMaster University in Canada, some people may need mental health support to exercise during the pandemic.

"Maintaining a regular exercise program is difficult at the best of times, and the cond...

Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

FRIDAY, April 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- While ER visits have stayed below normal levels as the coronavirus pandemic continues, the number of people showing up in the emergency department with mental woes is increasing, new federal government data shows.

Between March 29 and April 25, 2020, visits to emergency departments dropped 42%, researchers from the U.S. Centers...

'Magic Mushroom' Hallucinogen as Good as Antidepressants: Study

THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The magic ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may be at least as effective as standard medication for depression, an early clinical trial suggests.

The study of 59 patients with major depression tested the antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro) against psilocybin, which is the psychedelic substance in hallucinogenic mushrooms.

Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher Rates

WEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Before the pandemic began, suicide risk was twice as high among female nurses compared with American women as a whole, a new study warns.

Even within the health care community itself, female nurses were found to be roughly 70% more likely to die by suicide than female doctors.

Why? Study author Matthew Davis said that ...

Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis Can Take Big Toll on Women's Mental Health

Ovarian cancer is a tough diagnosis to cope with, and now a new study finds these patients face a much higher risk of depression and other mental health issues.

And the emotional anguish exacted a significant toll: The researchers also found it was associated with an increased risk of death during the study period among these women.

"Mental health issues are important for cancer pat...

Women More Prone to Concussion's Long-Term Harms: Study

After a concussion, women may be at heightened risk of lasting physical and mental symptoms, a new study finds.

The study of 2,000 concussion sufferers found that women were more likely than men to still have some symptoms one year later. The problems included fuzzy memory and difficulty concentrating, as well as headaches, dizziness or fatigue.

In contrast, women and men showed sim...

About 40,000 U.S. Children Have Lost a Parent to COVID-19

More than 40,000 U.S. kids have lost a parent to COVID-19 and the long-term impacts could be severe, experts warn.

Americans under age 65 account for about 1 in 5 COVID deaths. Of those, as many as 15% involve someone in their 40s and 3% someone in their 40s.

"In these younger age groups, substantial numbers of people have children, for whom the loss of a parent is a potentially dev...

Why Are Half of U.S. Kids With Mental Health Issues Not Getting Treatment?

Over half of high-risk children in the United States are not receiving behavioral health services critical to their mental, emotional and physical well-being, new research warns.

"It's a pretty simple and kind of widely agreed upon finding that there are a lot of at-risk kids, when you look at it in terms of adversities or symptoms, who aren't getting mental health services, behavioral he...

'Non-Drug' Approaches Can Fight Depression in People With Dementia

Exercise, mental stimulation and massage are among the drug-free therapies that are as good or better than medication in treating depression in dementia patients, researchers say.

They reviewed 256 studies that included a total of more than 28,000 people with dementia with or without major depression.

Medications alone were no more effective than usual care in treating depression in...

Suicide Attempts Spike Soon After Dementia Diagnosis

A new study shows just how devastating a diagnosis of mental decline can be: Researchers found that rates of suicide rise sharply in the months after such news is delivered.

The study of almost 148,000 older U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs patients, mostly men, looked at diagnoses for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is often (but not always) a precursor to dementia.

"Risk...

Half of COVID Survivors Struggle With Depression: Study

To the lingering damage of COVID-19 infection, add this side effect: New research shows that more than half of those sickened by COVID-19 report depression.

Among more than 3,900 people who had COVID-19 surveyed between May 2020 and January 2021, 52% suffered symptoms of major depression, researchers found.

"People who have been ill with COVID-19 can experience depressive symptoms f...

Beta Blockers Won't Cause Depression, But Might Impair Sleep: Study

Millions of people take a beta blocker regularly, and a new study brings good news: The medications will not raise the risk of depression.

Beta blockers are used to treat conditions such as heart failure, chest pains, high blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythm. But it's long been suspected that the drugs may be linked with depression, anxiety, drowsiness, insomnia, hallucinations and n...

Pandemic Has Harmed Mental Health of Nearly Half of U.S. Teens: Poll

If your teenagers have been struggling to cope during the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey suggests they are far from alone.

Researchers found that 46% of 977 parents of teens said their child has shown signs of a new or worsening mental health condition since the start of the pandemic.

More parents of teen girls than parents of teen boys reported an increase in anxiety/worry (36%...

Depression Often Follows Stroke, and Women Are at Higher Risk

The trauma and loss of stroke can often leave survivors with long-term depression, and women appear to be at special risk, new research shows.

"We did not expect that the cumulative risk of depression would remain so persistently elevated," said study author Dr. Laura Stein, an assistant professor of neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, in New York City.

She said ...

As Lockdowns Cut Into Exercise Time, Depression Rates Are Rising

Exercise has long been considered a "natural antidepressant." Now, research suggests that as lockdowns kept people from regular exercise, depression rates started to rise.

The finding is based on multiple mental health surveys conducted among three successive groups of University of Pittsburgh students, totaling nearly 700 in all. Surveys were initially launched before the pandemic, and t...

College Students With ADHD Have Lower Grades, Higher Dropout Rates

College students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a harder time making it to graduation than their peers do, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that of 400 students they followed, those with ADHD had a lower grade-point average (GPA) -- about half a grade lower -- than students without the disorder. The gap emerged freshman year, and persisted throughout coll...

History of Mental Illness Tied to Earlier Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

People with Alzheimer's disease often have a history of depression or anxiety, which might mean an earlier emergence of memory and thinking problems, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that of 1,500 Alzheimer's patients at their center, 43% had a history of depression, while almost one-third had a history of anxiety disorders.

Those patients also tended to be diagnosed ...

Migraines? Get Moving: Exercise Can Help Curb Attacks

Anyone who gets frequent migraine symptoms knows the experience: the throbbing, the pain, the visual disturbances.

Exercise has long been a potential way to reduce migraine triggers, but a new study suggests it could be an especially effective with triggers such stress, depression and trouble sleeping.

"It's a complex relationship, but we know that exercise, generally speaking, help...

Grumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep Schedule

A steady sleep routine may do more than keep you well-rested: New research suggests that the more swings in your slumber schedule, the worse your mood and depression symptoms are likely to be.

Researchers from Michigan Medicine followed the sleep patterns of interns in their first year of residency after medical school. That irregular sleep schedule can increase a person's risk of depress...

Lockdowns Are Leaving Kids With ADHD in Crisis

When clinical psychologist Maggie Sibley thinks about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, she worries most about the older teens who may drop out of high school and those kids who may be experiencing depression.

It would be hard to argue that this year hasn't been difficult for everyone, and that may be even mor...

As Social Media Time Rises, So Does Teen Girls' Suicide Risk

As the amount of time young teenage girls spend glued to Instagram, TikTok and other social media sites goes up, so does their long-term risk for suicide, a new study warns.

The finding stems from a decade spent tracking social media habits and suicide risk among 500 teenage boys and girls, the longest such effort to date, the study authors said.

"We found that girls who started usi...

Mental Health Trauma Plagues Wildfire Survivors

The 2018 wildfire that destroyed 239 square miles in Northern California, including the town of Paradise, left a lasting mental health crisis in its wake.

Many residents who survived the so-called Camp Fire are now grappling with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, according to a new study in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Heal...

Anxiety, Depression and Drinking: An Unhealthy Combo During the Pandemic

People with anxiety and depression are more likely to step up their drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic than those without these mental health issues, an online survey revealed.

Alcohol use grew the most among young people, but older adults with anxiety and depression were about twice as likely to report increased drinking as older adults without those struggles, New York University res...

Stressed Out By the News? Here's Tips to Help Cope

Be kind to your heart and health and turn off the news, doctors say.

Northwestern University experts suggest checking in on current events a couple of times a day and no more. Constant updates can fuel anxiety and depression, they warn.

"As a practicing preventive cardiologist, one of the most common risk factors for heart disease that I am seeing this year is stress," said Dr. Sadi...

Many Parents Support 'Teens Helping Teens' Mental Health Programs at Schools: Poll

It may take a village to support teens' mental health, whether it's during the pandemic or later.

One option is having school-based mental health programs that offer peer support leaders.

A new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at Michigan Medicine found that one in three parents are strongly in favor of a peer support program. The poll also asked ques...

'Mindfulness' on Your Mind? It Has Limits, Review Finds

Mindfulness is all the rage when it comes to boosting mental health, but new research suggests that it may not help everyone equally.

Practicing mindfulness meditation -- which involves paying close attention to what you are feeling in the moment -- may be better than doing nothing at all to improve anxiety, depression or lower stress, but it is not a cure-all and may not be any better th...

Survey Shows Mental Woes Spiked in U.S. Pandemic's First Months

It may be no surprise that the COVID-19 pandemic is causing some Americans significant psychological distress. That mental trauma hit people hard, even early in the pandemic, new research shows.

A new RAND Corporation study reports that more than 10% of Americans surveyed said they experienced psychological distress during April and May of 2020 -- the same number as in all of 2019.

...

Kids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of Mental Health Issues

Kids born with heart defects may be more likely to develop anxiety, depression and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), regardless of the severity of their heart condition.

Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting about 40,000 babies a year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The defects...

As Lockdowns Keep Pregnant Women From Exercise, Depression Rates Rise: Study

The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a toll on the emotional health of pregnant women whose exercise routines have been disrupted because of the coronavirus, new research shows.

Those women had higher depression scores than their counterparts who were able to exercise as usual, the researchers found.

"Our results demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate the elevated risk tha...

Pandemic May Be Tougher on Women's Mental Health Than Men's

The COVID-19 pandemic may be taking a bigger toll on women's mental health than on men's, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers examined the results of an online survey of 112 men and 459 women in Canada. The survey took place between March 23 and June 7, 2020.

During that time, schools and many businesses were closed, and people were told to stay home as much as possibl...

ADHD Raises Adult Suicide Risk, Especially for Women

Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a strikingly high prevalence of attempted suicide, with women being at particular risk, researchers say.

The study of nearly 22,000 Canadian adults found that 14% of those with ADHD had attempted suicide. That was roughly five times the rate of adults without ADHD, at 2.7%.

The findings among women were particular...

What Loneliness Looks Like in the Brain

As COVID-19 continues to spread and people face more isolation than usual, researchers are noting the impact of loneliness on the brain.

A new study from McGill University in Montreal found a tell-tale signature in the brains of lonely people. Specifically, they discovered variations in the volume of different brain regions and how those regions communicate across brain networks.

"W...

Pandemic Taking Big Mental Health Toll on Health Care Workers

Frontline health care workers have been through tremendous challenges this past year while treating COVID-19 patients throughout the world.

It should come as no surprise that many are having trouble emotionally.

A new study looked at the impact of the pandemic on sleep and mental health among the general population and health care workers by analyzing 55 studies involving nearly 190...

Pandemic Tied to Higher Suicide Rate in Blacks, Lowered Rate in Whites: Study

The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated racial divides in health care in numerous ways, and a new study reveals yet another: Suicides among Black people doubled during COVID-19 lockdowns, while suicides in white individuals were cut in half during the same period.

"In past pandemics, there has been noted rises in suicide, and the COVID-19 pandemic seemed like the perfect storm for suicid...

Loneliness Continues to Rise for Americans Under Lockdown

Loneliness, particularly among folks under shelter-in-place orders, is a growing issue for Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, new research finds.

More people report they are feeling lonely, depressed and even harboring thoughts of suicide as COVID-19 cases in the United States soar. And those who are chafing under lockdown or other stay-at-home restrictions appear to be at the gre...

Depression in Youth Ups Odds for Adult Illnesses: Study

Having depression during childhood or in the teen years appears to increase the odds of illness and early death later on, researchers say.

The new long-term study included nearly 1.5 million Swedes. Of those, more than 37,000 were diagnosed with depression at least once between the ages of 5 and 19 years.

The study participants were followed for 12 years. Those with an early history...

Too Much Social Media Time Could Raise Risk of Depression

Young adults who spend hours a day on social media are at heightened risk of developing depression in the near future, new research suggests.

In recent years, a number of studies have linked heavy social media use to an increased risk of depression.

"But then you have to ask the chicken-and-egg question," said study author Dr. Brian Primack, a professor of public health at the Unive...

COVID Fuels Depression Among Pregnant Women, New Moms

COVID-19 may be behind a concerning rise in the number of women suffering anxiety and depression before and soon after childbirth, a new study says.

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston surveyed more than 1,100 pregnant and postpartum women between May 21 and Aug. 17. They found that 36%, or more than 1 in 3, had significant levels of depression. Prior to the pandemic,...

Rap Music Is Putting Mental Health in the Spotlight

Beat-heavy rap music could help beat mental illness: Over the past two decades, the lyrics of the most popular songs in rap have increasingly hit on issues related to anxiety, depression and mental health, a new study reveals.

"I think anyone who's been a fan of rap music across the last two decades -- myself included -- had a feeling this was happening," said study author Alex Kresovich,...

'Body Issues' Raise Depression Risks for Teens

Body dissatisfaction significantly increases teens' risk of depression, researchers say.

The degree of heightened risk ranged from 50% to 285%, according to the report published online Dec. 8 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

"These findings demonstrate that body dissatisfaction should be considered as a public health issue of pressing concern," concluded a...

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