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06 Sep

Half of Moms with Children on the Autism Spectrum Have Depression, New Study Finds

Mothers with children on the autism spectrum report much higher symptoms of depression than mothers of neurotypical children, researchers find.

Health News Results - 633

FDA OKs Bivalent COVID Boosters for Kids 6 Months and Older

The updated bivalent COVID-19 boosters are now approved for use in children as young as 6 months of age, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today.

Children can receive either a Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech bivalent booster shot, although the rules differ depending on their age and what type of vaccine they got as their primary series, the FDA said.

Kids 6 months to 5 year...

1 in 10 Teens Have Sexted, Many See Porn by 6th Grade: Study

A high number of preteens and teens in the United States have viewed pornography and many have also sent or received nude or seminude photos -- sexting -- over their smartphones, a new study reveals.

“The prevalence rates we found in this study suggest that school counselors must be prepared to talk about sexting and pornography use with students, and to change the narrative about the...

U.S. States With Tighter Access to Welfare Payments Have More Kids in Foster Care

Researchers have discovered a link between access to welfare payments and foster care.

As many as 29,000 fewer children may have entered the foster care system during the 12-year study if U.S. states had made it easier for poor families to receive cash through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

"The relatively small amount of income provided through...

As Alcohol Abuse Declines Among Teens, Marijuana Abuse Soars

American kids are drinking to excess less and abusing marijuana more, a new study finds.

Marijuana abuse among 6- to 18-year-olds has increased 245% since 2000, while child alcohol abuse has steadily declined over those years, say researchers who analyzed poisonings over two decades.

"This dramatic increase does coincide with this huge wave of decriminalization in the U.S.," s...

Girl Toddlers Have Bigger Vocabularies, and Researchers Now Know Why

Young girls tend to babble their way to bigger vocabularies earlier than boys, and researchers now think they might know why.

It has nothing to do with gender, and everything to do with parental interaction, researchers assert.

Parents tend to talk more to young children who have started talking and can respond to them, regardless of gender, according to data derived from more than ...

Put Safety at Top of Your Holiday Toy Gift List

Getting toys for some of the tots in your life this holiday season? Experts at Penn State Health offer tips on making safe choices.

Each year, about 200,000 U.S. children end up in the emergency room with a toy-related injury, ranging from poisoning to choking hazards, according to Jen Lau

Shortages of Antibiotics, Antivirals Are Making a Tough Illness Season Worse

An early surge in cold and flu cases has created shortages in key antiviral and antibiotic drugs needed for the annual “sick season,” pharmacists report.

The antiviral flu drug Tamiflu is in short supply for both adults and children, in both its brand name formulation as well as the generic version, said Mich...

Food Banks Save Needy Families Up to $1,000 Per Year

Millions of Americans will enjoy a hot, nutritious Thanksgiving meal thanks to their local food pantry, often staffed by volunteers. Now, new research spotlights just how important these charities are.

Families who rely on pantries for food assistance come away with $600 to $1,000 in free meals and produce every year, after taking into account time, transportation and other costs associ...

Your Child Is Sick. Do You Call Your Doctor or Head to the ER?

It's a common dilemma when your child seems sick: Do you call the doctor, make a trip to urgent care or head straight to the emergency room?

If it's not an emergency, a call to your child's pediatrician may help guide you. The doctor's staff may recommend bringing your child in for a visit or going to urgent care -- particularly after hours when the pediatrician's office isn't open.

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Words Can Wound When Parents Talk to Kids About Obesity

With U.S. health officials calling childhood obesity a public health crisis, conversations about weight are important. But what you say to your kids can be challenging, and even counterproductive, a new study found.

"Body weight is a sensitive issue and the way we talk about it matters," said lead author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 21, 2022
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  • Many U.S. Parents Avoid Vaccine Talks With Child's Doctor

    Vaccines have become a hot topic in the past few years, but a new survey finds many parents aren't discussing immunization with their child's doctor.

    Though a child's pediatrician has often been the go-to resource on vaccines, the University of Michigan Medicine poll found that 1 in 7 parents have not discussed vaccines with their child's doctor during the pandemic.

    While 80% of p...

    Study Confirms It: Kids Keep Harried Moms From Exercise

    Something — or rather, someone — may be standing between moms and a regular exercise routine: their children.

    New research from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton in the United Kingdom suggests that fewer than half of mothers met recommended activity levels, a number that was even lower when the children were younger or there was more than one.

    “It is perhaps not ...

    Time Spent in Day Care Won't Harm Child's Development

    Millions of parents drop their toddlers off at day care centers so they can go to work, but some are racked with guilt about it.

    One of their main concerns? Time spent in group day care could encourage their toddler to start acting out.

    Now, a large, new study suggests that parents can breathe a sigh of relief: Kids who spend long hours in day care centers aren't any more likel...

    When a Parent Is Jailed, Children's Health Care Suffers

    Children's health is jeopardized when they have a parent in prison, new research finds.

    In the United States, 5 million kids have an incarcerated parent. Those children have worse access to primary, dental and mental health care than their peers, the investigators found.

    And that puts the kids at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes, according to the study.

    “...

    More U.S. Kids Are Heading to ERs After Drinking Cough Suppressant

    Increasing numbers of young children are showing up in emergency rooms after accidentally ingesting the cough suppressant benzonatate, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.

    Benzonatate is a non-narcotic cough suppressant first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1958 for children ages 10 and up. It works by reducing the cough reflex in the lungs and airways.

    "Benz...

    Even in Kindergarten, White Kids More Likely to Join Extracurricular Activities

    Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

    Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

    The study found similar results for other after-school...

    Illinois Study Shows Big Jump in Suicide-Linked ER Visits by Teens

    Illinois has seen a recent surge in the number of kids arriving in the emergency room for suicidal thoughts -- both during and shortly before the pandemic, according to a new study.

    Among kids ages 5 to 19, ER visits for suicidal thoughts rose by 59% across the state between 2016 and 2021, researchers found. That included a sharp spike in the fall of 2019, followed by another in the fall ...

    More Teens Are Getting Weight Loss Surgery, If Families Can Afford It

    A growing number of U.S. teenagers are undergoing weight-loss surgery, but the figures suggest many still lack access to the procedures -- especially underinsured Black and Hispanic kids.

    That's the conclusion of a new study charting trends in bariatric (weight-loss) surgery among U.S. teens. Researchers found that between 2010 and 2017, the annual rate of the procedures doubled among kid...

    Does Your Child Have a Cold or Severe RSV? Signs to Look For

    As most American parents already know, cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a common illness of childhood, are surging this year. Hospitals are filling up with babies and toddlers very ill with the easy-to-catch illness, which is coming back with a vengeance after lying low during the pandemic.

    But

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 14, 2022
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  • Liability Fears Keep Some Schools From Stocking Asthma Inhalers

    It's a potentially deadly issue: Some U.S. school administrators don't keep life-saving albuterol asthma inhalers on hand because they're afraid of getting sued for misuse. That's true even in states like Illinois, where strong "stock albuterol" laws are on the books, researchers say.

    Kids with asthma don't always carry their inhalers, and some may not even know they have asthma until the...

    Over 3 Million U.S. School Kids Now Vaping or Smoking

    Despite continued efforts by health advocates and U.S. public health officials, a huge number of middle and high school students are still using addictive tobacco products, most often vaping products.

    A new study released by two federal agencies on Thursday estimated a total of 3.08 million ...

    More U.S. Teens Are Getting Heavily Addicted to Vaping

    More American youth than ever are so addicted to e-cigarettes that they vape within 5 minutes of waking up in the morning, a new analysis shows.

    While that percentage was around just 1% in 2017, it increased every year after that. It reached 10.3% by 2021, researchers reported.

    "The increasing intensity of use of modern e-cigarettes highlights the clinical need to address youth addi...

    CDC Warns of Rare Bacterial Infections From Dentists' Water Lines

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning that a number of U.S. children have picked up a serious infection from contaminated water lines at the dentist's office.

    Although rare, outbreaks of nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) infections have been reported in kids treated at the dentist, one cluster in 2015 and another in 2016, the CDC says. A third cluster ide...

    Infant Head-Shaping Pillows Are Useless and Dangerous to Baby, FDA Warns

    Infant head-shaping pillows are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and should not be used, the agency warned Thursday.

    The pillows can create an unsafe sleep environment for infants, potentially contributing to the risk of suffocation and death.

    Marketed as changing an infant's head shape or symmetry or claiming to treat other medical conditions, they have no demo...

    Parent's Mental Health Can Affect Kids' Asthma Care

    When a parent is depressed, their child's asthma care may suffer. Now, research suggests that getting a child's asthma under control may include assessing a parents' mental health.

    Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern found that treating a parent's depression could sometimes improve symptom control in asthmatic children.

    About 8% of American children have asthma. Sympto...

    Pediatricians Offer Tips on a Spooky But Safe Halloween

    By the time they're in elementary school, kids typically know their favorite parts about celebrating Halloween.

    But the holiday is still new to babies and toddlers, and some little ones may find it all too much.

    That's OK, said pediatrician Dr. Dina DiMaggio, a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She offered some tips for getting started with babies and toddlers who might ...

    Doctors Answer Your Questions About RSV

    While a potential COVID winter surge and the impending flu season get a lot of attention, doctors are worried about another virus.

    This one is RSV -- short for respiratory syncytial virus -- and hospitals across the country are seeing a surge of cases in infants and young children. The virus can...

    What Parents Need to Know About Cronobacter Bacteria in Baby Formula

    Cronobacter sakazakii has been in the news as the cause of infant infections and the reason for a U.S. baby formula recall and resulting shortage this year.

    Infections are rare and the bacteria is harmless for most people. Yet it can be dangerous or even life-threatening for infants, especially those who ar...

    Toddlers Nap a Lot - and Then They Don't. New Research Uncovers Why

    Why do some preschoolers refuse naps while others have a meltdown without an afternoon snooze? Researchers suspect it may have a lot to do with a specific memory-related part of the brain.

    While young children all need a lot of sleep, they do vary widely in when they stop napping during the day: Some leave naps behind by the time they are 3, while many others happily take an afternoon nap...

    Cases of Child RSV Are Swamping Hospitals. What Are the Symptoms, Treatments?

    Pediatricians' offices, children's hospitals, urgent care centers and emergency rooms across the United States are being overwhelmed by an early, heavy surge of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) among infants and young children.

    Reported cases of RSV started rising dramatically in September, and by mid-October were at their ...

    U.S. Child Hunger Spiked in Weeks After Child Tax Credits Repealed

    Child tax credits had a huge impact in U.S. households that struggle to afford food.

    And after those credits ended, many...

    Sleep-Deprived Kids Will Snack More: Study

    Experts studying kids' sleep and eating habits have learned more about a potential reason for childhood obesity.

    Kids who are deprived of sleep tend to eat more calories the next day, researchers found. And some of those extra calories come from less-healthy, sugar-laden snacks or treats.

    "When children lost sleep, overall they ate an extra 74 calories per day, caused by an increase...

    Almost All Adolescents Who Begin Gender-Affirming Hormones Continue Into Adulthood: Study

    When young adolescents strongly identify with a gender that does not match their gender at birth, one option is to offer a reversible treatment that can delay the onset of puberty.

    If the desire to transition endures, that delay can be followed with a second step: hormone treatments designed to trigger physical changes that match a young person's true sense of identity. But that begs the ...

    Kept Home Under Lockdown, U.S. Couples May Have Spurred a 'Baby Bump'

    The pandemic brought about a lot of changes in people's lives. For many, that included a new baby.

    The United States saw a “baby bump” in 2021 described in a new study as “the first major reversal in declining U.S. fertility rates since 2007.”

    It was the opposite of what early forecasts predicted.

    “Ther...

    Online Sexual Abuse of Kids Is Common; Perps Usually Friends, Partners

    Substantial numbers of kids and teens are being tracked, lured and sexually abused online, and adult strangers aren't always the perps.

    In many cases, it's friends and dating partners who are doing the grooming, a new study shows.

    The prevailing image of online sexual abuse is an older predator ...

    Early Elementary School Start Times May Not Harm Kids' Grades

    While later school start times can benefit middle and high school students, elementary school kids do just fine with an earlier wake-up call, according to new research.

    An earlier bell in elementary school may mean less sleep, but it doesn't affect learning for those children, according to research in a pair of studies published Oct. 13 in the journal Educational Evaluation and Policy...

    Too Few Young People Get Mental Health Follow-Up After ER Visit

    When teens and young adults go to the emergency room or are hospitalized for critical mental health issues a staggering number are not receiving quick follow-up care, new U.S. research finds.

    Researchers at the University of Massachusetts looked at more than 100,000 ER visits of young people ages 12 to 27 who have private insurance. Only about 29% received follow-up care within seve...

    Curbing Football Drills Could Make High School Football Safer

    Tackling drills are typically a staple of high school football practices, but new research suggests dropping them from training might cut the risk of head hits.

    Using mouth guards with sensors that recorded every head hit, researchers found players who spent 5,144 minutes in non-contact practice had just 310 head hits, while those who had nearly 7,000 minutes in high-speed training with c...

    Children & the Truth: A 'Complicated' Relationship

    While kids are told not to lie, they also get mixed messages about being honest in different situations.

    In a new study, researchers looked at how adults reacted to kids' levels of honesty in various situations, from telling bold truths to telling subtle lies.

    Among the key findings: Kid...

    FDA Approves New Bivalent COVID Booster for Use in Children

    The new bivalent COVID-19 booster is now approved for children as young as 5 years old, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

    The bivalent booster shot includes one part that protects against the original strain of the COVID-19 coronavirus, and another part that targets the hi...

    Pandemic Lockdowns May Have Slowed Babies' Communication Skills

    When social interaction came to a halt during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, newborn babies missed out on vital communication milestones, researchers say.

    A new Irish study found about 25% of these new babies spent a year without ever meeting a child their own age. Incidental interactions with strangers and community members at grocery stores or play groups didn't happen. They...

    7 Million U.S. Women Live in Maternity Care 'Deserts': Report

    Pregnancy can be safer and healthier for both mom and baby with good access to quality maternity care.

    Yet, the United States is still among one of the most dangerous developed nations for childbirth, especially in rural areas and communities of color, according to a new March of Dimes repo...

    Could Video Games Trigger Dangerous Heart Rhythms in Kids?

    Playing video games may seem sedentary, but it can be enough to trigger life-threatening heart arrhythmias in certain vulnerable children, a new report finds.

    Researchers in Australia pulled together reports of 22 children and teens who suffered heart rhythm disturbances while playing video games. In many cases, th...

    Teens Can Be Tough on Parents. Staying Close Can Make All the Difference.

    Parents who make an effort to spend quality time with their teens -- while offering affection and understanding -- are more likely to remain close to them as they enter adulthood, new research suggests.

    “The data tell a clear story: You reap what you sow,” said lead author Gregory Fosco, a professor of human development and family studies at Pennsylvania State University.

    Parent...

    Family Meals Together Ease Stress, Survey Confirms

    Experts have long suggested that family dinners serve up many health benefits.

    Now, a new survey from the American Heart Association backs that up: An overwhelming 91% of parents said their family is less stressed when they break bread with each other.

    “Sharing meals with others...

    Big Rise in E-Scooter Injuries Among U.S. Kids

    With the growing popularity of electric scooters, the number of kids injured while riding them has jumped dramatically, a new study finds.

    Moreover, those injuries have become more ...

    America's Teen Athletes Are Bouncing Back After Pandemic Lows

    Before the pandemic, Theodore Kleinman, then a rising high school freshman, was excited to earn his spot on the varsity track team. Aside from staying in shape, he was also looking forward to making new friends and being part of a group.

    Unfortunately, COVID shutdowns derailed those plans. Now, as a junior, the New York City teen is finally back on track -- literally and figuratively. "I ...

    Fractured Skulls, Broken Bones: Bike Injuries Still Common for Kids

    Over 1 million U.S. children and teens — many of them male — have broken bones and fractured their skulls in bicycle injuries over the past 20 years, according to new research that brought together two decades of data.

    Boys aged 10 to 15 were particularly at risk. Nearly 87% of kids with

    Severe Food Allergies Can Traumatize Kids, But New Program Helps Ease Fears

    For a young child with life-threatening food allergies "the world looks like a minefield," a New Jersey mother says.

    It's a stress-filled landscape that financial adviser Amy Leis knows all too well. Her daughter Zoe was just a few months old when she suffered her first serious reaction to food, a potentially deadly event known as

    Half of Cases of Childhood Blindness in U.S. Didn't Have to Happen

    More than half of sightless children in the United States did not have to lose their vision, according to a new study.

    The findings suggest the need to prioritize addressing preventable vision loss in all children in America, said study co-author Dr. Scott Lambert, a professor of ophthalmology at Stanford University in California.

    He recalled the story of a child diagnosed with cat...

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