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Results for search "Sports Medicine".

Health News Results - 102

If your teens play just one sport, new research suggests you might want to encourage them to try others.

Researchers report that focusing solely on one sport puts high school athletes at increased risk for injuries and burnout.

The investigators surveyed 975 U.S. high school athletes and found that more than 1 in 5 had a high level of specialization in one sport, while more than 42...

As youth spring sports kick into high gear, it's important to know about injury prevention and treatment, an expert says.

Injury risks and preventive measures can vary by sport, according to Dr. Marcus Knox, a physical therapist in the department of orthopedic surgery at ...

College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.

Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to ...

A ruptured Achilles tendon can reduce a weekend warrior to a limping one. And there's no single right way to treat it.

People who've suffered this common injury may fare just as well with physical therapy as with surgery, a new clinical trial shows.

Outdoor sports season is nearly here, and with rough play comes the risk of concussion.

But one of the most-used tools to assess sports-related concussion from the sidelines isn't as precise as one might like, a new study a...

As sign-ups for youth football get underway this spring, a new study reveals that Americans may love their football, but half now believe that kids should not play the tackle version of the game.

The researchers found that of nearly 4,000 U.S. adults surveyed, only 45% agreed that tackle football is an "appropriate sport for kids to play." Half disagreed, while the remaining 5% were unsur...

Researchers already know that repeated hits to the head on the football field are linked to a degenerative brain disease, as seen in a number of retired NFL stars. Now, experts have turned their attention to ice hockey, another high-contact sport.

When studying whether the hits, year after year, can also be linked to

Soccer headers are a staple of scoring in any match, but new research suggests that the practice can harm what experts called "signaling pathways" in the brain.

The findings are based on analyses of blood samples from 89 professional soccer players, aged 18 to 35, in Norway.

The blood samples were taken when the players were at rest and one hour and 12 hours after three situations: ...

Two new studies on pain relief suggest there is a safer alternative to addictive opioid painkillers after knee and shoulder surgery.

The findings dovetail with changes to voluntary federal guidelines for prescribing opioid painkillers proposed by the U.S...

Worried that a COVID-19 vaccine might hamper your workout? New research suggests you can hit the gym with minimal effects.

In a study of 18 healthy people who received a COVID-19 vaccine, the participants were monitored while they did cycling workouts before and two to three weeks after being fully vaccinated.

The researchers also conducted exercise tests in a cont...

With America's best skiers, skaters and snowboarders now heading to the Winter Olympics, a team of mental health professionals will be in Beijing to help them perform under the double strain of intense competition and a pandemic.

One of those professionals is Dr. David Baron, provost of Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, Calif. He'll enter the Olympic Village in Beijing as t...

If you or someone you know has suffered a concussion, a medical evaluation is crucial, an expert says.

A concussion is "a short-lived functional brain injury typically caused by a bump or blow to the head," Cleveland Clinic con...

Folks who've had a tough case of COVID-19 shouldn't hit the gym for basketball or an aerobics class without getting checked out by their doctor first, according to the American College for Sports Medicine.

The disease wracks the body in ways that can be tough on athletes, especially if they develop

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • January 20, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • Many parents struggle with the decision to let their kids play tackle football or other contact sports due to the risk of concussions and long-term brain diseases that may occur with repeated head blows.

    Now, new...

    NFL players are four times more likely to die of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS) than other people, new research finds, adding to known links between football-related head injuries and brain diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

    And the longer they played football, the greater their risk, the new study found.

    ALS, or

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 16, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • Right now, the devastating concussion-linked brain condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be diagnosed after death via autopsy. But new research could help change that, allowing doctors to someday spot the illness earlier.

    According to the new study, MRI may be able to detect CTE while people are still alive.

    "While this finding is not yet ready for the ...

    Blows to the head are common among America's kids, with close to 7% showing signs of a brain injury at some time in childhood, U.S. health officials report.

    Sports, falls and abuse are likely causes, experts say.

    Concussions and other head injuries are more common among white kids than Black or Hispanic kids. And prevalence increases with age -- from 2% in children up to 5 years ol...

    A heart condition, myocarditis, has been found in a number of U.S. college athletes who have had COVID-19, a new study finds.

    Myocarditis has also been linked in some young people to the COVID vaccine. But the odds are far greater that this inflammation of the heart muscle will occur in those who get COVID infection itself, experts said.

    "We're still learning about how the vir...

    Repetitive head hits are common in football, and they're also linked to debilitating brain injuries.

    But rendering a definitive diagnosis typically means waiting for autopsy results after the player has died.

    Now, a new study suggests that brain scans can reliably spot troubling signs of sports-inflicted neurological damage while a person is still alive.

    The research also show...

    NBA great Michael Jordan had a special ritual he would follow before every free throw: He would assume a shoulder-width stance, spin the basketball in his hands, bounce the ball three times, and then spin the ball once more while focusing on the rim before finally taking his shot.

    Now, new research suggests similar routines could improve your sports performance, whether you're an amateur ...

    Addictive opioid painkillers aren't the only option for patients seeking relief following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee reconstruction, researchers say.

    As the United States wrestles with skyrocketing rates of opioid abuse and drug overdose deaths, the findings may come as good news.

    After ACL surgery, Advil and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminop...

    Long COVID is rare in college athletes, but those who have had COVID-19 should see a doctor if they have chest pain during activity, the authors of new study advise.

    The extent and effects of persistent symptoms in athletes after COVID-19 infection have been unclear, so researchers went searching for answers.

    "For the vast majority of athletes, this study shows that a return to play...

    Contrary to long-held wisdom, teen athletes recover from concussions sooner if they do light aerobic exercise rather than resting in a dark room, new research suggests.

    Instead of so-called "cocoon therapy," new research-supported therapy has young concussion patients getting out of bed and doing protected exercise earlier.

    "What the research found was that adolescents were having a...

    Dr. Kim Huffman, an avid runner, gets a fair amount of guff from friends about the impact that her favorite exercise has on her body.

    "People all the time tell me, 'Oh, you wait until you're 60. Your knees are going to hate you for it'," Huffman said. "And I'm like, 'That's ridiculous'."

    Next time the topic comes up, Huffman is well-armed: An extensive British analysis of prior stud...

    Days in the saddle can be risky, with horseback riding a potentially deadly activity, according to a new study.

    "Hospital admission risk from horseback riding is higher than football, auto and motorcycle racing, and skiing," the study authors noted. Chest injuries are most common among riders, but head and neck injuries are the deadliest.

    The findings show that "equestrian-related i...

    Adult staff in schools are more likely than students to suffer sudden cardiac arrest, but automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are often used and improve the chances of survival, a new study finds.

    AEDs are portable devices that deliver an electric shock to try and restart the heart. If appropriate action isn't taken immediately, cardiac arrest is often fatal.

    "Most research on ...

    Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

    Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

    "We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

    It's not just athletes on the field who suffer when outdoor temperatures get too high. Members of college and high school marching bands are at increased risk of heat-related illness, too, researchers warn.

    "They go out there, and they often wear these really heavy wool uniforms," said lead author Andrew Grundstein of the University of Georgia. "They practice many times for hours and hour...

    College athletes who suffer a concussion may take as long as a month to recover, not the two weeks considered normal, new research finds.

    "Normal return-to-play time was previously set at 14 days -- meaning 50% of people recovered in that time," said lead researcher Steve Broglio. He is director of the University of Michigan Concussion Center in Ann Arbor. "Our paper suggests that 28 days...

    The pause in youth sports caused by the COVID-19 pandemic wound up shaking some budding athletes to their core, a new U.S. survey shows.

    More than 1 in 10 youth athletes ended up reconsidering their sports goals or aspirations as the pandemic closed stadiums and gyms. That included one-quarter of athletes in their later teens, researchers found.

    Some felt that the pandemic cost them...

    Football and other contact sports get a lot of attention for their injury hazards. But for most adults, bike riding is the biggest back-breaker, a new study suggests.

    Of more than 12,000 sports-related spinal injuries among U.S. adults, researchers found that a full 81% were due to bicycling mishaps. The injuries mostly included vertebral fractures, often in the neck but also in the middl...

    Achilles tendon injuries have skyrocketed in the United States this year, researchers report.

    Physicians at Michigan Medicine-University of Michigan diagnosed more Achilles ruptures during June 2021 than in all of 2020.

    Injuries to the body's strongest, thickest tendon account for about 30% of all sports-related injuries, and are most common among active, middle-aged men, they added...

    Having a genetic heart condition often means the end of sports for young athletes, but new research could be a game changer.

    A 20-year study by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that for kids with most genetic heart conditions, the risks of playing sports can be managed through a shared decision-making process.

    The study is a continuation of research on return to play ...

    Young soccer players have more head impacts during practices but experience more severe head impacts during games, a small, preliminary study shows.

    The findings could help devise ways to improve head impact safety in youth soccer, according to the researchers.

    "Headers are a fundamental component to the sport of soccer. Therefore, it is important to understand differences in header...

    To do their best, Olympic athletes need to be both physically and mentally fit, but the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics has made that a real challenge, experts say.

    "This Olympics is unprecedented," said Dr. Michael Lardon, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

    The Tokyo Olympics itself, which officiall...

    Before you sign your young pitcher up to play baseball in multiple leagues, familiarize yourself with guidelines that can protect them against overuse injuries.

    Sound obvious? A new survey shows it isn't, because most parents have no idea what those guidelines are.

    Players under age 18 are pitching more and more frequently, often for several teams year-round, which is prompting a ri...

    A treatment commonly used to tackle an often painful Achilles tendon condition doesn't actually work, British researchers warn.

    At issue is "Achilles tendinopathy," a degenerative wear-and-tear disease that affects the critical tissue linking calf muscles to the heel.

    Patients have sought pain relief with a treatment -- embraced by a number of famous athletes -- that involves inject...

    Athletes have a much higher risk of the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation than non-athletes, and younger athletes have a higher risk than older athletes, according to a new report from Britain.

    Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is an irregular, often rapid heart rate that can impede blood flow. A-fib can increase the risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related problems.

    ...

    Strict rest isn't advised after athletes suffer a concussion because it could slow their recovery, an updated consensus statement from a U.S. expert panel says.

    Most adult athletes fully recover within two weeks and children within four, according to the statement published June 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

    The number and severity of initial symptoms are th...

    The nutrient zinc can be both helpful and harmful when it comes to kidney stones, a new study finds.

    There have been two conflicting theories about the link between zinc and kidney stones. One suggests zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones. The other suggests zinc changes the crystals' surfaces, which encourages further growth.

    Turns ...

    It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests.

    The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the head, said researcher Mark Burns. He is head of the Laboratory for Brain Injury and Dementia at Georgetown University, in ...

    Heart complications are rare among college athletes who have had COVID-19, according to a small study.

    "Our findings may offer reassurance to high school athletes, coaches and parents where resources for testing can be limited," said senior author Dr. Ranjit Philip, assistant professor in pediatric cardiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in Memphis.

    For the ...

    Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

    And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

    "One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

    As children begin to return to their favorite sports, parents need to ensure that their youngsters use protective eyewear, a leading group of eye specialists says.

    Nearly 30,000 people suffer sports-related eye injuries every year in the United States, but 90% of emergency room visits for such injuries could be prevented by protective eyewear, according to the American Academy of Ophthalm...

    Here's some good news for aging athletes: If you played high school football, you're no more likely than others to have problems with concentration, memory or depression in middle age, according to a new study.

    "Men who played high school football did not report worse brain health compared with those who played other contact sports, noncontact sports, or did not participate in sports dur...

    Young baseball players are at risk for overuse injuries, but there are ways to play it safe and prevent such problems, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) says.

    "Overhead athletes, such as baseball players, place significant repetitive stress on the shoulder and elbow joints," orthopedic sports surgeon Dr. Nima Mehran said in an academy news release.

    Between overuse ...

    Though playing youth sports comes with new pandemic-era precautions and some experts are linking these activities to community spread of COVID-19, many kids are still participating, according to a parent survey.

    In the survey, about three-quarters of parents said their child's teams mostly did the right thing while resuming sports during COVID. Thirteen percent said officials were too str...

    FRIDAY, April 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) - Being active is good for most everyone, and new studies now show it can help kids with autism manage common behavioral issues.

    "Exercise goes beyond health-related benefits and increased levels of fitness for those with autism," said David Geslak, a pioneer in using exercise to help kids with autism. "Research shows that exercise can increase focus...

    The stereotypical image of pot smokers has long been one of "stoners" parked on the couch, surrounded by snacks and glued to the television, but a new study dispels that notion.

    Instead, people who use marijuana may exercise just as much as other people do, and perhaps even a little more, researchers report.

    Considering how important regular exercise is to one's overall health, the ...

    Researchers outfitted high school athletes with head impact sensors to see which of four popular sports put them at the greatest risk of concussion.

    No. 1 for both boys and girls: Soccer, according to a study published online recently in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. Blame it on intentional headers, which accounted for 80% of head impacts in that sport.

    "Provi...