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Results for search "Injuries".

20 Feb

Common Tech-Related Injuries

Do you have swiper's thumb or text neck?

03 Dec

E-Scooter Injuries On The Rise

Broken bones most common injury in e-scooter accidents.

Health News Results - 151

More Kids Injured by Tiny Magnets After Sales Ban Was Lifted: Study


Small, powerful magnets in toys like Buckyballs building sets and jewelry kits are causing an alarming number of serious pediatric injuries in the United States, new research warns.

Analyzing national data, researchers found an 80% rise in these injuries to children from 2016 to 2019, following the repeal of a sales ban on the magnets by a federal court.

Thin Ice: Global Warming May Be Raising Drowning Risks

More children and young adults are drowning in winter lakes because of warming temperatures that create unstable lake ice, a new study finds.

A team of international researchers examined several decades of data, including 4,000 drownings and population information from throughout Canada, 14 U.S. states, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Finland, Russia, Sweden and regions of Italy and Japan. They...

Not Harmless: Rubber Bullets, Pepper Spray Rob Vision

Last summer, the American Academy of Ophthalmology condemned the use of rubber bullets as a law enforcement tactic for crowd control during protests that rocked the United States. The argument: rubber bullets can cause serious eye injury.

Now, a new study backs up that concern, finding that the use of rubber bullets and pellets, pepper spray, tear gas and/or bean bag guns does, in fact, i...

'Tough Guy' Mentality Keeps Athletes in Denial About Pain

A culture of toughness and resilience is encouraged among elite college rowers, but it can keep them from reporting injuries, a new study finds.

There's an overall myth among athletes that admitting pain is a sign of weakness and failure, the researchers said.

Irish and Australian rowers in this study felt compromised by lower back pain, which is common in the sport, the st...

Clear Danger: Glass-Topped Tables Injure Thousands Each Year

At Rutgers New Jersey Medical School's trauma center, Dr. Stephanie Bonne and her team noticed a string of patient injuries caused by broken glass tables.

"They were quite serious, significant injuries that required pretty big operations and long hospital stays," said Bonne, who is an assistant professor of surgery and trauma medical director. "We wanted to see, is there anything that...

Children Use Both Sides of the Brain to Understand Language

Adults process language on one side of the brain, but kids use both hemispheres, a new study suggests.

The finding might explain why children recover more easily from brain injuries than adults, the study authors added.

"This is very good news for young children who experience a neural injury," said researcher Elissa Newport. She's a neurology professor at Georgetown Univer...

Gun Violence Costs U.S. Health Care System $170 Billion Annually

A rise in gun violence and a resulting increase in severe injury demand urgent action to curb these trends and lower the high cost of saving victims' lives, researchers say.

"We hope that our findings are able to better inform policy in terms of violence prevention as well as reimbursement to hospitals, which are often in underserved regions, that care for these patients," said Dr. Pe...

ER Visits for E-Scooter Injuries Nearly Double in One Year

As the popularity of electric scooters has accelerated in the United States, so have serious injuries, which nearly doubled in just one year, a new study reveals.

In 2019, more than 29,600 e-scooter riders were treated in U.S. emergency rooms, up from about 15,500 the year before, the researchers found.

"I probably operate on at least two to three people that have scooter i...

Dance Injuries Jump in United States

Dance-related injuries treated at U.S. emergency departments increased by nearly one-quarter in recent years, a new study reveals.

Between 2014 and 2018, there was a 22.5% rise in such injuries, with more than 4,150 cases seen in ERs nationwide during that time.

Strains and sprains accounted for almost half of the injuries, according to the National Athletic Trainers' As...

Skull Fractures, Broken Jaws: 'Beanbag' Rounds Shot at Protesters Cause Severe Harm

When police and National Guard troops mobilized during protests that broke out across the nation this spring following the death of George Floyd, they often resorted to the use of so-called "beanbag" rounds of ammunition when confronting crowds.

Beanbag rounds -- a small cloth bag filled with lead shot and fired from a standard shotgun -- are thought to be strong enough to cause pain ...

Too Many Kids Getting Seriously Hurt Riding ATVs: Study

All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are a big draw for adventure-loving kids, but a new study warns that the thrill ride can often land children in the ER.

U.S. data shows that nearly 280,000 children were treated over a 25-year period for head and neck injuries caused by ATV accidents. That's about 31 children each day -- and nearly half of them were younger than 12, the researchers reported...

Repeat Bone Density Tests Might Not Be Needed, Study Finds

Bone density tests are often touted as a way to predict the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women, but a new study casts doubt on the value of repeating this commonly used test.

The research was led by Dr. Carolyn Crandall, of the division of general internal medicine and health services research at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine. Her team collected data on more than 7,000 ...

Ladder Injuries Can Go Far Beyond Broken Bones

Falling off a ladder can cause long-lasting mental and physical health problems, researchers say.

The new study included 134 people who fell off ladders and were seen at the emergency departments of two hospitals in Queensland, Australia, between October 2015 and October 2016.

More than half of the patients were men over 55 and most were injured while doing chores around the...

Follow Exercise Guidelines and You'll Live Longer, Study Says

Getting the recommended amount of exercise could cut your risk of early death, a new study indicates.

U.S. government guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic activity a week. They also suggest adults do moderate or greater intensity muscle-strengthening exercise at least two days a week.

That effort...

Injuries Shoot Up After Fireworks Laws Loosened in West Virginia

West Virginia loosened fireworks sales rules in 2016. And since then, the state has seen a 40% boom in fireworks-related injuries, researchers say.

The regulation change made it easier for people to buy Class C fireworks such as Roman candles, bottle rockets and fountains.

"Since there has been a trend among states to liberalize these laws, I think it is wise for states ...

Pandemic Means More Backyard Fireworks This Year -- And More Danger

With communities across the United States canceling Fourth of July celebrations due to the COVID-19 pandemic, backyard fireworks are likely to be more popular than ever.

And that has many health experts worried. They fear injuries will soar among amateurs who don't know how to use fireworks safely. Even before the holiday, explosives are being set off in America's backyards and on c...

A Safer 4th Is One Without Backyard Fireworks

If you plan to celebrate Independence Day, you might want to reconsider setting off fireworks, Prevent Blindness suggests.

There are other, safer ways to mark the United States of America's birthday, according to the nonprofit eye health and safety group. It noted that thousands of Americans are injured by fireworks each year, especially around July 4th.

"There are so many w...

Vaping-Related Lung Injuries Still Happening -- And May Look Like COVID-19

Reports of serious, even deadly, vaping-linked lung injuries dominated the headlines late last year, then COVID-19 took over the news.

But those lung injuries haven't gone away, and signs of e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) can look a lot like a COVID-19 infection, federal and state health officials warn.

Eight cases of EVALI were reported i...

Your Genes May Affect How You'll Heal If Wounded

Your genes may have a big impact on bacteria in your wounds and how quickly you heal, new research shows.

The researchers said their findings could help improve wound treatment.

Chronic wounds -- ones that don't show signs of healing within three weeks -- can be costly, and bacterial infection slows the process.

A range of bacterial species are present in chronic w...

Working From Home?  Posture, Ergonomics Can Make It Safe

If you're working from home because of the coronavirus pandemic and expect to keep doing so, you need to be sure your work station is set up properly, an orthopedic specialist says.

You also need to take regular breaks to move around, according to Terrence McGee, a physical therapist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

In an office, many people have ...

Concussion Can Lead to Vision, Balance Problems in Young Kids

Young children who suffer a concussion are likely to have vision and balance problems, according to a new study.

"Since one-third of pediatric and adolescent concussion injuries occur in elementary school-age children, we set out to provide a comprehensive description of children ages 5 to 11 years who were diagnosed with a concussion to pinpoint opportunities to improve the quality ...

Eye Experts Call for Ban on Police Use of Rubber Bullets

Rubber bullets can cause severe eye injuries, blindness and even death, and they shouldn't be used against protesters, claims a petition signed by almost 400 U.S. eye doctors.

The petition was first launched by ophthalmologists at the University of California, San Francisco, on June 2 in response to police use of rubber bullets during the nationwide protests sparked by the death of G...

Kids Breaking Fewer Bones During Pandemic, But More Fractures Happening at Home

There's been a nearly 60% drop in broken bones among U.S. children during the coronavirus pandemic, but the rate of fractures that occur at home has climbed, a new study finds.

The researchers analyzed data on 1,735 youngsters treated for acute fractures at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) between March 15 and April 15, and compared that data with the same time perio...

Physical Jobs Tied to More Sick Leave, Earlier Retirement

People with physically demanding jobs take more sick leave. They also have higher unemployment rates and shorter work lives, a new Danish study finds.

"This study showed that high physical work demands are a marked risk factor for a shortened expected working life and increased years of sickness absence and unemployment," study co-author Lars Andersen and colleagues wrote. Andersen is...

To Prevent Injuries, Give Your Kids a Pass on Cutting the Grass

Asking your child to mow the lawn is a risky proposition, a new study suggests.

About 9,400 American kids are injured by lawn mowers each year, and mowers cause 12% to 29% of all traumatic amputations among them, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Toe and foot amputations are the most common.

"Lawn mower injuries are largely preventable, but d...

Injuries a Drain on Employee Productivity

Injuries in the United States take a huge toll on the workplace, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed millions of workplace health insurance claims among adults aged 18 to 64 between 2014 and 2015, with a specific focus on non-fatal injuries treated in emergency departments.

The injuries examined in the study included burns, poisonings, gunshot wounds, fal...

Active Older Vets More Likely to Fall, But Less Likely to Get Hurt: Study

Physically active U.S. veterans are more likely to fall but less likely to get hurt when they do, compared with inactive older adults who didn't serve in the military, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed 2006-2015 data from nearly 12,000 veterans and nearly 37,000 others. Compared to non-veterans, vets had 11% more falls that didn't result in injuries, but 28% fewer falls...

Sheltering at Home? Take Steps to Prevent Injuries From Falls

As you shelter at home during the coronavirus pandemic, eliminate hazards inside that could lead to falls, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) suggests.

Preventing injuries will help avoid putting added strain on a health care system struggling to treat COVID-19 patients, academy spokesman Dr. Todd Swenning said.

One out of five falls causes a serious injury,...

Kids of Mentally Ill Parents Have Higher Injury Odds

Children of parents with mental illness are at increased risk for injuries, researchers report.

Risk is highest before 1 year of age, but remains elevated to age 17, according to the new study.

"Our results show there is a need for increased support to parents with mental illness, especially during the first year of life," said Alicia Nevriana. She is one of the study autho...

Many Car Crash Deaths Involve Alcohol Levels Below Legal Limit: Study

About 15% of alcohol-related road deaths in the United States involve drivers with blood alcohol concentrations below the legal limit, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed 16 years (2000 to 2015) of U.S. motor vehicle crash data. They found that 37% of the more than 600,000 motor vehicle deaths during that time involved at least one driver with alcohol in their blood...

ACL Surgery Can Do Real Damage to Your Brain: Study

Your knee might never be the same after undergoing surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and the reason is in your head, a small, new study suggests.

It turns out ACL reconstruction causes changes in the structure of your brain, a University of Michigan (U-M) team found. That's why even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy, your joint function might never get b...

5 Expert Tips for Preventing Winter Sports Accidents

Hitting the slopes or the skating rink as the winter of 2020 winds down? Don't let an accident or injury spoil your fun.

"Winter sports and recreational activities have great health and cardiovascular benefits," said Dr. Joseph Bosco, vice president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). "However, it's important not to underestimate the risks that cold weather can br...

Spring Time Change Tied to More Fatal Car Crashes

Turning the clocks ahead one hour in the spring and losing an hour of sleep increases the risk of fatal car crashes, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 733,000 fatal car crashes that occurred between 1996 and 2017 in states that make the spring switch to Daylight Saving Time (DST).

The risk of fatal crashes rose nearly 6% in the we...

Gene Test Might Spot Soccer Players at High Risk for Brain Trouble

A gene mutation implicated in the risk for Alzheimer's disease might also impair memory in soccer players who head the ball a lot, a new study suggests.

The finding could have implications for young athletes in contact sports where the head can take hits during play.

Among soccer players who headed the ball the most, those with the gene mutation called the apolipoprotein E ...

Many of America's Most Critical Workers Are Short on Their Zzzs

More than one-third of working Americans don't get enough sleep, and the problem is greatest among the police, the military, health care workers and truckers, researchers report.

Their analysis of data from more than 150,000 employed adults between 2010 and 2018 also found that the rate of inadequate sleep (7 hours or less) rose from about 31% to nearly 36% during that time....

Climate Change May Translate Into More Fatal Injuries

If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

The res...

Concussions Strike College Students Far More Often Than Thought

On college campuses in the United States, students suffer concussions twice as often as believed, and most of those injuries occur off the playing field, new research from the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests.

"This study shows how common head injuries are among this population and that concussions are not restricted to the athletic field," said study co-author Dr. John Brec...

Eye Injuries From Household Cleaners Drop, But Kids Remain at Risk

Having little ones visit for the holidays? Be sure to stow household cleaners safely out of their reach.

These products are a major source of reports to U.S. poison control centers, and exposures often involve the eyes. Though overall eye exposures have declined in the United States, the number of cases involving young children remains high.

Between 2000 and 2016, U.S. poiso...

Distracted by Their Smartphones, Pedestrians Are Landing in the ER

Talking and texting on your smartphone is a big no-no for drivers, but new research suggests the same should be true for pedestrians.

According to one database, more than 2,500 men and women went to an emergency room for head and neck injuries sustained while using a smartphone between 1998 and 2017. When that number is extrapolated to include the whole country, the total is likely to...

Vaping May Have Triggered Lung Illness Typically  Only Seen in Metalworkers

A lung disease that normally strikes in the workplace has been linked to vaping in a new report.

A 49-year-old California woman who vaped marijuana came down with a form of pneumonia normally associated with exposure to hard metals in industrial settings, according to a case study published Dec. 5 in the European Respiratory Journal.

The disease, called hard-metal pne...

Gunshot Wounds Have Long-Term Health Consequences: Study

Emergency department patients treated for gunshot wounds to the chest or abdomen are more likely to wind up in the hospital again than those who have such wounds in other areas of the body, a new study finds.

The study included 110 patients with a history of gunshot wounds. Most were men, with an average age of 50. The patients were seen in the emergency department at Thomas Jefferson...

Dramatic Rise in Eye Injuries From BB and Paintball Guns

Popularized in movies, the phrase, "You'll shoot your eye out," is often repeated jokingly whenever someone talks about BB or paintball guns.

But it's no laughing matter. These "non-powder" guns can cause serious, life-altering injuries, and these injuries are now happening far more often.

In fact, a new study found that while the overall rate of injuries due to BB and pain...

Music Career Might Bring Ringing in the Ears

Being a musician might be hard on your hearing, new British research suggests.

Those in the music industry have a much higher risk of tinnitus than people who work in quieter settings, a new study finds.

People with tinnitus hear ringing, buzzing or whistling noises when there are no external sounds.

"Our research shows that people working in the music industry are...

Animal Study Offers Hope for Treating Traumatic Brain Injuries

In a finding that might one day counter some of the damage of severe brain injury in humans, researchers report that embryonic neurons implanted in brain-injured mice helped resurrect memory and eased seizures.

"The idea to regrow neurons that die off after a brain injury is something that neuroscientists have been trying to do for a long time," said study leader Robert Hunt, an assi...

These Sports Are Most Likely to Send Young Americans to the ER

Of all sports, football sends the most U.S. males to the emergency room, while cheerleading and gymnastics most often do the same for women and girls, a new report finds.

And, overall, U.S. emergency departments see about 2.7 million patients between the ages of 5 and 24 for sports-related injuries each year, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prev...

Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,100, CDC Says

The number of Americans stricken with a severe lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 2,172, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That's a rise from the 2,051 case total from a week ago.

Cases have now been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by three over the past we...

Jimmy Carter Recovering After Brain Procedure

After three falls in recent months, former President Jimmy Carter was recovering at an Atlanta hospital Tuesday morning following surgery to ease pressure on his brain caused by bleeding from those falls.

The 95-year-old "is recovering at Emory University Hospital following surgery this morning to relieve pressure on his brain from a subdural hematoma. There are no complications from ...

Vitamin E Acetate Is Leading Suspect in Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses: CDC

A new federal report points to an oily chemical known as vitamin E acetate as the likely culprit behind more than 2,000 cases of severe lung illness among vapers.

After taking fluid samples from the lungs of 29 vapers who were hospitalized for the illness in 10 states, scientists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention spotted the chemical in all of the samples.

Juul Stops Sales of Mint-Flavored E-Cigarettes

Juul Labs will halt sales of its mint-flavored electronic cigarettes, the company announced Thursday.

The latest move follows new government research that showed Juul is the most popular brand among high schoolers who vape, and that the majority of young vapers like mint-flavored e-cigarettes the most.

"These results are unacceptable, and that is why we must reset the vap...

Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,000, CDC Says

The number of Americans stricken with a severe lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 2,051, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That's a rise from the 1,888 case total from a week ago.

Currently, cases have been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by two over the pa...

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