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Results for search "Environment".

24 Mar

Listening To The Sounds of Nature Has Major Health Benefits, Study Finds.

The sound of birds singing and rain falling can boost your health and lower stress, researchers say.

29 Dec

Is Your Favorite Seafood Contaminated With Microplastics?

These 3 seafood species have the highest levels of plastic particles, researchers say.

Health News Results - 273

Is It Allergies or COVID? Expert Shows How to Tell the Difference

Seasonal allergies are striking this year at the worst possible time, with the United States in the midst of a fourth wave of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

You've got an itchy nose and watery eyes. Or maybe you've got a fever and a sore throat. Or you've developed a cough and you have trouble breathing.

Is it COVID-19, or just your usual allergies?

Confusion is perfectly under...

Live Near a 'Superfund' Site? Your Life Span Might Be Shorter

Living near a Superfund hazardous waste site may shorten your life, new research suggests.

There are thousands of Superfund sites across the United States and they include manufacturing facilities, processing plants, landfills and mines where hazardous waste was dumped, left out in the open or poorly managed, posing a risk to the environment and human health.

In this study, researc...

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress does not trigger binge eating in people with eating disorders, new research suggests.

The findings challenge a common theory that's never been directly tested in patients, according to the study authors.

Their research included 85 women (22 with anorexia, 33 with bulimia and a control group of 30 without an eating disorder). The study participants were assessed for two days t...

A Woman's Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her Granddaughter's Health Today

A long-banned pesticide may be having health effects that ripple across generations, a new study suggests.

At issue is DDT, a once widely used pesticide that was banned in the United States in 1972. That ban, however, was not the end of the story.

DDT is a persistent organic pollutant, a group of chemicals that are slow to break down and linger in the environment for years. So ...

Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

COVID-19 might have a tough new foe: The sun.

New research shows that sunnier regions of the United States have lower COVID-19 death rates than cloudier areas, suggesting that the sun's UV rays might somehow provide some protection against the disease.

The effect is not due to better uptake of the healthy "sunshine vitamin," vitamin D, noted the Scottish research team led by Richard...

More Biodiversity, Better Mental Health?

It probably won't show up on any real estate listing, but making your home in a place with many different kinds of birds and plants may be good for you.

That's the upshot of a German study that showed people who live in areas with greater biodiversity have better mental health than those in areas with fewer types of plants and birds.

The finding is another example of how conserving ...

Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists thought twice about studying North American bats in their winter habitats. But they've now determined that the risk of humans passing the coronavirus to bats under these conditions was low.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) led the study. It found the risk to be one in 1,000 with no protective measures and one in 3,333 with proper use of per...

Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Kids to the ER

Nonsmokers usually try to avoid secondhand smoke, but many kids have no option, and now a new study finds tobacco smoke exposure puts them at higher risk of hospitalization.

Compared to other kids, those exposed to secondhand smoke were more likely to have had an urgent care visit over a one-year period, and to incur higher costs for such visits. They also were nearly twice as likely to b...

When Coal-Fired Power Plants Close, Kids With Asthma Breathe Easier

Fewer children end up in ERs for asthma attacks if nearby coal-fired power plants are shut down, a new study finds.

"When these power plants close, we see a reduction of somewhere between 12% and 18% in emergency department visits for asthma," said senior researcher Emily Pakhtigian, an assistant professor of public policy at Pennsylvania State University. "When the plants close down, chi...

Waves Lapping, Birds Singing: Nature's Sounds Bring Healing, Study Finds

If you feel recharged after a day spent in the great outdoors, there's a physiological reason for that.

Bird song and lapping waves combat negative feelings such as annoyance and stress, while boosting positive emotions and health, according to new research using the sounds found at U.S. national parks.

"It's good for what we're calling positive affect, so things like feelings of t...

Spring Cleaning Can Sweep Away Allergens From Your Home

If seasonal allergies get you down, try tackling them with a good spring cleaning.

This can not only ease some of those spring symptoms, but also get rid of allergens you've been living with for a while, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"If you aren't someone who regularly undertakes spring cleaning, consider tackling it this year," said D...

AHA News: Study Links Green Communities to Lower Stroke Risk

The greener the neighborhood, the lower the stroke risk, a new study suggests.

Researchers matched images gathered from space to health data from residents to come up with their findings. The work adds to evidence that shows where someone lives affects their health, said study co-author Dr. William Aitken. He is a cardiology fellow at the University of Miami and Jackson Memorial Hospital ...

Storm Alert: How to Keep Your Home Safe

Winter weather can bring hidden dangers, the most deadly of which can include carbon monoxide poisoning and fires.

As blizzards, tornadoes and severe storms batter the nation and many lose power and heat, the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires from portable generators and other devices increase exponentially, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

Carb...

Racist 'Redlining' Policies Leave Legacy of Stroke for Black Americans

Discriminatory housing practices from nearly a century ago continue to influence a person's risk of suffering a stroke, claims a new study that reveals the legacy of structural racism in the United States.

Researchers found a 1.5% higher rate of stroke within census tracts in Columbus, Ohio, most heavily marked for "redlining," compared to neighborhoods in the city least affected by housi...

Common Household Chemicals Tied to Preemie Births

Even when women do their best to have a safe pregnancy, chemicals commonly found in the home could still raise their risk for premature delivery, a new study shows.

The chemicals -- called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) -- are used as flame retardants in items like furniture and carpets.

For the study, researchers analyzed blood samples from over 3,500 pregnant women, includ...

Backyard Chicken Coops Pose Threat of 'Viral Spillover' to People

Raising chickens in your backyard -- a popular trend during the COVID-19 pandemic -- holds risks that can come home to roost in an unwelcome way.

It's already well known that poultry can spread the salmonella bacteria to human handlers. But chickens cooped up in backyards could also be breeding grounds for viruses that pose an even bigger public health threat, according to Sonia Hernandez...

Pollen Peril: Sneezin' Season May Up COVID Risk

It's that time of year when flowers and trees bloom freely and pollen makes the lives of many miserable. But new research reveals a hidden risk: It could also make you more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection.

COVID-19 infection rates waxed and waned with pollen counts in 2020, according to tracking data gathered across 31 countries in every corner of the globe.

"Airborne pollen can pa...

Global Warming Could Make Survival in Tropics Impossible: Study

Limiting global warming to targets proposed in the Paris Agreement could keep tropical regions from reaching temperatures that are beyond human tolerability, a new study projects.

Researchers estimate that if countries are able to cap warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the tropics will be spared temperatures that surpass the "survival limit." But life in the worl...

How Moving the Homeless to Hotels During the Pandemic Helps Everyone

Giving homeless COVID-19 patients a free hotel room for their quarantine and recovery pays huge health dividends for the entire community, according to a new study out of San Francisco.

Only 4% of homeless folks transferred from Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital to a participating hotel wound up back in the hospital with worsened COVID-19 symptoms, the researchers said in the repo...

American Indians Face the Highest Odds for Stroke

While strokes strike many Americans, a new study shows the risk is particularly high among American Indians.

Researchers already knew that American Indians had the highest risk of atrial fibrillation, which is an irregular heartbeat ("arrhythmia") that can increase the risk of blood clots and stroke.

The new study found that American Indians had a 47% higher risk of having a non-ble...

How Climate Change Could Put More MS Patients in Danger

When temperatures rise, people with multiple sclerosis need to keep cool. Heat sensitivity is a hallmark of the central nervous system disorder.

So, what happens when warm weather spikes become more frequent because of climate change?

More MS patients end up in the emergency room. A new study found that during periods of unusually warm weather, they were more likely to visit the eme...

Want Less Violent Prisons? Plant More Trees

It's already known that green space offers significant benefits in institutional settings, such as hospitals and schools, but new research suggests it may also reduce violence in prisons.

In the new study, researchers compared the amount of trees, lawns and shrubs at prisons in England and Wales with data on violence between prisoners, prisoner assaults on staff and prisoner self-harm.

As Climate Change Lengthens Allergy Season, Pollen Travels Farther

If you suffer the itchy, sneezy, wheezy consequences of seasonal allergies, you're probably painfully aware that pollen season is starting earlier and lasting longer than ever.

It's an upshot of climate change, and new research from Germany offers an explanation for this extended sneezin' season: Pollen is on the move, with early blooming spores now wafting across traditional locales and ...

Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

If you think you can safely exercise without your mask in a gym during the pandemic, two new government reports show you are mistaken.

Coronavirus outbreaks at fitness centers in Chicago and Honolulu last summer were likely the result of exercisers and instructors not wearing masks, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered.

In the Chicago study...

Could Americans Get to COVID Herd Immunity by Late Spring?

Hungry for good news on the pandemic? One epidemiologist believes Americans might reach herd immunity to the new coronavirus as soon as late spring.

That's the view held by Suzanne Judd, a professor with the school of public health at the University of Alabama (UA) at Birmingham. To come to that conclusion, she reviewed recent research and data from her home state.

"I really am star...

Tougher State Gun Laws, Less Gun Violence Among Teens: Study

States with more gun laws have less youth gun violence, new research reveals.

For the study, the researchers examined data from several states from 2005 to 2017, and found that kids were less likely to be armed in states with more gun laws, and more likely to carry a weapon in states with fewer gun laws.

Louisiana and Arkansas had the highest percentage of armed youth in 2017 at 12....

COVID & Elevators: A Dangerous Mix, But Here's How to Make It Safer

As the new coronavirus vaccine rollout gathers speed, elevators will likely become a flash point for businesses hoping to reopen offices while sticking to social distancing.

And a new computer simulation suggests that the usual "first-come, first-served" elevator routine is neither safe nor practical.

"Now that vaccines are within reach, many buildings are slated for phased re-openi...

Mental Health Trauma Plagues Wildfire Survivors

The 2018 wildfire that destroyed 239 square miles in Northern California, including the town of Paradise, left a lasting mental health crisis in its wake.

Many residents who survived the so-called Camp Fire are now grappling with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, according to a new study in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Heal...

Silent Killer: Watch Out for Carbon Monoxide Dangers This Winter

Carbon monoxide poisoning can prove fatal without a warning, because it can't be seen, smelled or heard.

It's important to be aware of it, especially during winter when you're indoors and using heat sources to stay cozy.

The Nebraska Regional Poison Center has some tips for preventing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and recognizing symptoms of exposure to CO.

CO is a gas produc...

Are Your Allergies Worse? Blame Climate Change

In a grim development for allergy sufferers in North America, a new investigation warns that pollen seasons are getting longer and worse.

Over the last three decades, the annual pollen season has expanded by nearly three weeks, accompanied by a 21% jump in pollen concentrations.

A big underlying cause: climate change.

"It is clear that global warming is the major culprit ...

Climate Change May Have Helped Emergence of New Coronavirus

It's a link few might have considered, but a new study indicates that climate change may have prompted the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rising temperatures caused by greenhouse emissions have boosted the growth of bat-friendly forest habitat in China's southern province of Yunnan and neighboring areas, making the region a hotspot for bat-borne coronaviruses, the researchers explained. Genetic data ...

Cancer Plagues California Sea Lions, With Implications for Humans

A virus-linked cancer killing California sea lions is sounding a chilling alarm for mankind.

Exposure to environmental toxins significantly boosts risk for the herpes-like cancer, which was discovered in sea lions in 1979.

Since then, between 18% and 23% of adult sea lions admitted to a California animal rescue-and-research center have died of the disease. That's the highest rate f...

How Your Neighborhood Can Hamper Your Teen's Sleep

Living in a noisy neighborhood with less green space negatively affects teens' sleep, which may lead to poorer memory and thinking skills, according to a pair of studies.

In a study on residential environment, researchers found that as noise levels steadily increased, so too did the time needed for teens to fall asleep. They also didn't sleep as long as kids in quieter, greener neighborho...

Like Flu, COVID-19 May Turn Out to Be Seasonal

Like influenza, could COVID-19 evolve to wax and wane with the seasons? New research suggests it might.

Early in the pandemic, some experts suggested that SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes COVID-19 -- may behave like many other coronaviruses that circulate more widely in fall and winter.

To find out if that could be true, researchers analyzed COVID-19 data -- including cases, deat...

Women's Menstrual Cycles Tied to Moon's Phases: Study

There have long been theories that women's menstrual cycles align with the moon, and now a new study suggests there's some truth to that.

Using years of records kept by 22 women, researchers found that for many, menstrual cycles "intermittently" synced up with the phases of the moon.

The link happened only about one-quarter of the time for women aged 35 or younger, and just 9% of th...

Legacy of Racist Neighborhood 'Redlining': Fewer Healthy Green Spaces Today

A racist mortgage appraisal practice used in the United States decades ago has resulted in less green space in some urban neighborhoods today, researchers say.

Those so-called "redlined" neighborhoods have higher rates of air and noise pollution, racial segregation and poverty -- all of which can contribute to poorer health.

In the 1930s, the Home Owners' Loan Corporation (HOLC) gav...

Lockdowns' Benefits for Air Quality Weren't as Big as Thought: Study

Two types of air pollution declined in cities around the world during initial COVID-19 lockdowns, but one type increased, a new study finds.

Researchers assessed changes in levels of nitrogen dioxide, ozone and fine particulate (PM2.5) air pollution during lockdowns in 11 cities: Beijing and Wuhan in China; Milan; Rome; Madrid; London; Paris; Berlin; New York; Los Angeles; and Delhi, Indi...

Global Warming May Be Triggering Toxic Algae Blooms Along U.S. West Coast

New toxic algal blooms have appeared on the U.S. west coast due to an ocean heat wave, a new study finds.

The researchers said that climate change is increasing the frequency of highly toxic algal blooms in this area.

These algae produce a neurotoxin called domoic acid that causes severe and potentially lethal digestive and neurological symptoms, and is a threat to marine wildlife a...

Which Seafood Has the Highest Amount of Microplastics?

Those mussels, oysters and scallops on your plate may come with a secret ingredient: microplastics.

Researchers at Hull York Medical School and the University of Hull in the United Kingdom reviewed more than 50 studies (from 2014 to 2020) to investigate the levels of microplastic contamination globally in fish and shellfish.

The investigators found that mollusks (such as clams, muss...

Do Genes Doom Some Kids to Obesity? Probably Not, Study Finds

While childhood obesity is a significant challenge, German researchers have uncovered some hopeful news while investigating the impact of genes.

Though some "obesity genes" do play a minor role in the success of weight loss interventions, environmental, social and behavioral factors make the biggest difference, according to a new study from the Technical University of Munich.

Those ...

High Blood Levels of Cadmium May Be Tied to Worse COVID-19

Old age and chronic health conditions aren't the only risk factors for serious COVID-19 infection. Researchers say people with high levels of the heavy metal cadmium may also have higher odds of severe disease during the pandemic.

Cadmium is found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables. Previous research has shown that long-term exposure to cadmium, even at low levels, may weak...

Kids' Weight Rises When Convenience Stores Open Nearby: Study

Children have an increased risk of obesity when there are more convenience stores in their neighborhood, a new study shows.

"In this study, we found that community food environment, particularly small neighborhood stores, can significantly influence children's weight status. Our findings are useful for designing future interventions and public policies," said study author Punam Ohri-Vacha...

Social Media Messages Can Lower People's Meat Intake

One way to to influence meat consumption -- and perhaps curb climate change -- is through social media messaging, according to a new study that used Facebook Messenger.

"The results of the research are really encouraging," said study co-author Wouter Poortinga, a professor of environmental psychology at Cardiff University in Wales. "It shows that we can make changes to our diet, and if we...

Avoid Allergy Flare-Ups This Holiday Season

Doctors are warning about the threat of COVID-19 transmission as cold weather forces people indoors. But indoor allergies could also take the joy out of your holiday season, an expert says.

Dust, mold, pets, furniture and houseplants can cause indoor allergies, said Dr. David Corry. He's a professor of medicine in the section of immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Me...

Working at Home Brings Its Own Health Perils: Survey

Working from home may take its toll on mental and physical health, but making some tweaks to your workspace and your headspace may help maximize the potential benefits and minimize any downsides, a new survey suggests.

Nearly 65% of people who were working from home due to COVID-19 restrictions reported new physical woes including "tech neck" and lower back pain, and about 74% said they h...

Scientists Test Safest Way Driver, Passengers Can Avoid COVID Spread

Traveling in a car with another person during the pandemic? Certain key steps might cut the odds of coronavirus spread during the trip, researchers say.

One big move that helps: Drive with all four windows down and have the passenger sit in the rear seat on the opposite side from the driver, the new study found.

This helps create "an air flow pattern that travels across the cabin, ...

Could Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?

Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal "plaque" accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. In the new study, researchers found that among older adults with memory and thinking problems, those exposed to higher levels of air po...

Childhood Lead Exposure Tied to Brain Changes in Middle Age

Middle-aged adults who had elevated levels of lead in their blood as children have brain structure changes, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed childhood lead exposure data on 564 participants in a long-term study of people who were born in the same town in New Zealand in 1972 and 1973.

The participants grew up during the peak era of leaded gasoline (late 196...

Thin Ice: Global Warming May Be Raising Drowning Risks

More children and young adults are drowning in winter lakes because of warming temperatures that create unstable lake ice, a new study finds.

A team of international researchers examined several decades of data, including 4,000 drownings and population information from throughout Canada, 14 U.S. states, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Finland, Russia, Sweden and regions of Italy and Japan. They...

Global Warming Has Ticks Jumping From Dogs to Humans

Climate change could increase people's risk of getting dangerous diseases from ticks, researchers warn.

The investigators conducted tests with brown dog ticks that carry the bacteria that cause the deadly disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and found the ticks are much more likely to prefer feeding on the blood of people than dogs when temperatures rise.

Brown dog ticks are ...

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