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Health News Results - 173

Minority residents of U.S. nursing homes and assisted living communities have been especially hard hit in the coronavirus pandemic, two University of Rochester studies show.

The first found that nursing homes with higher percentages of racial and ethnic minority residents reported two to four times more new COVID-19 cases and deaths compared to others for the week of May 25.

Dealing with acne can be especially difficult for people of color, a skin expert says.

Acne affects up to 50 million people in the United States each year. For people of color, acne is often accompanied by dark spots or patches called hyperpigmentation.

"Acne is the most common skin condition in the U.S., and it can be particularly frustrating for people with skin of color b...

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown a spotlight on disparities in the U.S. health care system. But the issues are longstanding, and -- as one large study illustrates -- extend into a common elective surgery.

Researchers found that when hip replacement surgery is done at a "safety net" hospital designed to serve the poor and uninsured, patients' risks are higher. Of more than 500,000 Amer...

Adult obesity in the United States continues to rise, and being obese increases the risk of severe illness in people with COVID-19, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns.

Agency data also show that racial and ethnic disparities in obesity rates persist.

New CDC maps for 2019 put adult obesity rates in 12 states at or above 35%: Alabama, Arkansas, Indi...

Current wisdom holds that white kids are at greater risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than Black children are, but a new analysis finds the opposite is true.

In a review of 21 previously published U.S. studies, which included nearly 155,000 Black children in the United States, researchers found that 14.5% of these children had ADHD. That's much higher than t...

Many Black Americans have jobs that expose them to the new coronavirus, which may help explain why they are more likely than whites to die of COVID-19, researchers say.

"There are a lot of theories why Blacks are dying at higher rates than other races during this pandemic," said study co-author Fares Qeadan, a biostatistician at the University of Utah.

"However, our descript...

New research reveals what may be fueling racial disparities in U.S. prostate cancer deaths -- disparities that have black patients dying at higher rates than whites.

What are they? Education, income and insurance.

"Socioeconomic status and insurance status are all changeable factors. Unfortunately, the socioeconomic status inequality in the United States has continued to inc...

Lifestyle interventions can help people lose weight, but experts have worried whether such programs can work in low-income communities where obesity rates can be high and access to health care can be limited.

Until now.

A new study found that when these programs are made accessible, meaningful weight loss can be achieved.

The research team, led by Peter Katzmarzy...

It takes close to three years for a Black preschooler with autism to get a definitive diagnosis, a new U.S. study finds.

That delay means that young Black Americans miss out on early intensive treatment that is essential to help children with autism be better able to deal with school and social life, the researchers said.

"It's not the parents who are delaying diagnosis, it...

A new report adds to data suggesting that the coronavirus pandemic is even tougher on U.S. minorities than it is on whites.

The research, from the University of Minnesota, shows that Black and Hispanic Americans, as well as American Indians and Alaskan Natives, are much more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than their white peers.

For the study, the research team trac...

Although minorities are paying a disproportionate price in the rate of COVID-19 illnesses and deaths, they are underrepresented in clinical trials, a new study finds.

The researchers call upon the government, medical journals and funders of research to make sure trials include minorities so that the results can be extrapolated to the U.S. population.

In the Adaptive COVID-...

Despite the fame and fortune that comes with being an elite athlete, new research finds that Black NFL players are much more likely than their white peers to be in poor health once they retire.

After surveying nearly 3,800 former pro football players, investigators found that Black players say they are 50% more likely to struggle with chronic disabling pain than white players, and...

Stroke is more deadly among Black people than whites, and the reason may come down to genetics.

Researchers who studied the genomes of more than 21,000 Black people found that a common variation near the HNF1A gene was tied to an increased risk of stroke in people of African descent.

The gene has been linked to stroke and heart disease.

"Given the undue burden t...

Black and Hispanic Americans are much more likely than white people to avoid going to the hospital for heart attack or stroke symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic, an online survey reveals.

More than half (55%) of Hispanics, 45% of Black people and 40% of white people said they'd be scared to go to the hospital if they thought they were having a heart attack or stroke, be...

U.S. minorities have been particularly hard-hit by the coronavirus pandemic, and a new study suggests kids are no exception.

Researchers found that at one community testing site, nearly half of Hispanic children and teens were positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The same was true of 30% of Black kids.

The rate among white kids hovered around 7%.<...

Former First Lady Michelle Obama said Wednesday that she is suffering from "low-grade depression."

"I'm waking up in the middle of the night because I'm worrying about something or there's a heaviness," Obama said during her "The Michelle Obama Podcast." "I try to make sure I get a workout in, although there have been periods throughout this quarantine, where I just have felt too low...

High blood pressure is often seen as a condition of old age, but a new study finds that it's common among young Americans -- especially young Black adults.

The study, of 18- to 44-year-olds in the United States, found that high blood pressure was prevalent across all racial groups: Among both white and Mexican American participants, 22% had the condition.

But young Black...

When healthy kids have surgery, serious complications are uncommon. But even in that low-risk scenario, Black children fare worse, a new study finds.

Looking at more than 172,000 U.S. children who had inpatient surgery, researchers found that Black kids faced higher post-operative risks. That included more than three times the risk of dying within 30 days.

Experts stressed t...

The rate of second strokes among Mexican Americans has declined steeply since the turn of the century, a new study finds.

Between 2000 and 2013, the rate of recurrent stroke fell faster in Mexican Americans than in white people. By 2013, there was no difference between the two groups.

"Throughout this long-term study, this is the first time that we have encountered an improv...

People with sickle cell disease are at increased risk for severe complications from COVID-19, an expert says.

"Many patients experience a pain crisis, also known as a vaso-occlusive crisis, early in COVID-19 infection before respiratory symptoms develop," said Dr. Jennie Hart, clinical director of pediatric hematology/oncology at Herman and Walter Samuelson Children's Hospital at Sina...

U.S. government-funded clinical trials for new cancer treatments have more Black participants than those run by drug companies, but Blacks are still underrepresented in cancer studies, researchers say.

The SWOG Cancer Research Network team analyzed data from 358 clinical trials -- 85 drug industry trials and 273 SWOG trials. They included nearly 94,000 patients who were being treated ...

Ethnic and minority groups make up nearly all meatpacking employees who've been infected during COVID-19 outbreaks at their plants, a new government study reveals.

The stats show that nearly 1 of every 10 workers in affected plants were diagnosed with COVID-19, based on figures from 14 states that reported the total number of workers in facilities with outbreaks. Among infected worker...

Early-stage breast cancer is more likely to be diagnosed in U.S. states that have expanded Medicaid coverage under Obamacare than in those that haven't, researchers say.

Their new study looked at a database of more than 71,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in 31 states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act and 14 states that did not.

In the expan...

Even after undergoing the artery-clearing procedure angioplasty, Black patients with heart disease are more likely than whites to suffer a heart attack or die within the next several years.

That's the conclusion of a new analysis of 10 clinical trials: On balance, both Black and Hispanic patients fared worse after angioplasty, versus white patients. And that was particularly true for ...

Cardiologist Dr. Willie Lawrence remains haunted by the memory of police shooting his best friend during a 1966 race riot in Cleveland.

"I saw my best friend shot in the back and the leg by police. I saw his sister shot five times. I witnessed all that, and that impacted me for the rest of my life," said Lawrence, chief of cardiology at HCA Midwest Health's Research Medical Center in ...

Health insurance plans with high deductibles may be taking a financial toll on Black patients, according to a new study of cancer survivors.

The researchers said the findings point to yet another reason for racial health disparities in the United States: High deductibles may make it harder for Black patients, in particular, to afford medications or see a doctor.

"Just becaus...

COVID-19 is being diagnosed in Hispanic communities at a disproportionately high rate, a new study of the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., area shows.

Researchers found that among nearly 38,000 patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 at Johns Hopkins Health System, 16% were positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

That figure was much higher -- almost 43% -- among Hispanic pat...

Poverty and crowded living conditions increase the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, a new study suggests.

Researchers reached that conclusion after testing nearly 400 women who gave birth at two hospitals in New York City during the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak.

"Our study shows that neighborhood socioeconomic status and household crowding are strongly assoc...

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage and anti-racism demonstrations sweep the United States, 83% of Americans say the future of the nation is a significant source of stress, a new report reveals.

The previous high in the American Psychological Association's annual Stress in America report was 69% in 2018.

Also in the new report, 72% of Americans said thi...

Months into a global pandemic, some groups of Americans simply don't know enough about COVID-19 to protect themselves and others against the highly infectious respiratory virus, a new study reports.

Most folks have a pretty good grasp about how COVID-19 spreads and the three main symptoms (fever, cough, difficulty breathing) that should prompt you to get tested for the virus, said lea...

If there is one thing that recent police brutality protests have demonstrated, it is that life for black people in America is steeped in stress.

And while it might seem logical to assume that all that stress would translate into higher rates of mental health conditions like depression and anxiety, that doesn't seem to be the case -- at least not when actual diagnoses are tallied.

...

Smoking carries a host of health risks, and now a new study shows the habit significantly increases black Americans' risk of stroke.

The research included more than 5,300 participants, aged 21 to 84, from the tri-county area around Jackson, Miss. In the final analysis, 546 were current smokers, 781 were past smokers, and 3,083 never smoked.

The participants were part of the ...

Black Americans with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, wait longer for surgery than white patients, a new study finds.

"We already knew that black patients with melanoma have a worse prognosis and that longer time to treatment is associated with worse survival, but we didn't fully understand the relationship between race and time to treatment after controlling for various o...

More than 1 in 10 middle and high school students in the United States used e-cigarettes within the last month, according to a University of Michigan study that found the rate in some schools is as high as 60%.

It also found that vaping is highest in schools with a higher percentage of white students and where more students smoke traditional cigarettes. Rates are also higher in th...

A letter signed by nearly 1,300 public health professionals, infectious diseases professionals and community stakeholders says fear of COVID-19's spread is no excuse to stop people from joining police brutality protests in cities across America.

Instead, it supports the anti-racist demonstrations and suggests ways that demonstrators can limit their risk of infection.

"We are...

Black children appear to be particularly vulnerable to the rare but severe inflammatory syndrome striking kids with COVID-19, a new French study suggests.

The syndrome may be a delayed immune response to the virus that happens several weeks after infection, the researchers said.

Many patients suffer abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea, unstable blood pressure and inflammat...

Just as Americans are emerging from COVID-19 quarantines, hoping to resume normal life but still fearful of infection, protests against police violence are raging in cities across the country.

And millions remain unemployed, as a shaky economy attempts to restart.

How are folks expected to cope with all of this?

"For a lot of people, we might be reaching the breaki...

Black and white women share genes that increase the risk for breast cancer, a new study finds.

These genes include BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2, each of which is associated with a more than sevenfold risk of breast cancer. Women of both races also share four other genes linked with a moderately increased risk, according to researchers.

"This means that the multi-gene panels that...

The new coronavirus is disproportionately striking minority populations -- particularly urban blacks and Navajo Indians living on their reservation. Experts say social and economic factors that predate the COVID-19 crisis may help explain why.

"We found that there were large disparities in the proportion of people at risk of COVID-19 from minority and low-income populations," said stu...

Black Americans with severe sleep apnea and other sleep problems are at increased risk for high blood sugar levels that can lead to diabetes, a new study finds.

The researchers examined sleep patterns and blood sugar (glucose) of 789 men and women, average age 63, enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study, the largest study of cardiovascular disease in black Americans.

One-quarter...

Poor and minority Americans are most likely to lose access to clean tap water as droughts become more common and severe, a new paper says.

Water service in the United States is delivered by tens of thousands of community systems, most of which are small and funded locally, according to the study.

More than 80% of the 50,000-plus U.S. community water systems delivering wa...

Worries over medical bills would prevent 1 in 7 Americans from seeking treatment if they had possible symptoms of COVID-19, a new poll finds.

Of more than 1,000 adults surveyed, 6% -- representing 15 million Americans -- said that during the coronavirus pandemic, they or a family member had been denied care for another health problem.

Asked if they would seek medical att...

Dr. Felipe Lobelo is sad but not surprised the coronavirus pandemic appears to be taking a greater toll on African Americans and Latinos.

The pandemic and another crisis "have collided, and it's accelerating the bad outcome," said Lobelo, an associate professor at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta who researches health disparities.

That other crisis, ...

Sexual health programs appear to help increase condom use and abstinence among black American teens, researchers say.

They analyzed data from 29 studies that examined the effect of school- and community-based programs on nearly 12,000 teens.

"We focused on black adolescents because they face greater health disparities when it comes to the risk of unplanned pregnancy and cont...

The coronavirus pandemic is hitting African Americans hard, early data suggest. But Sonjia B. Dickerson doesn't need a spreadsheet to tell her that.

She lost a beloved uncle to apparent COVID-related causes. A cousin succumbed to the same. Another relative is fighting the disease. And Dickerson, pastor of the Dayspring Family Church - a nondenominational, predominantly African American ...

Dr. Rachel M. Bond has seen the difference black cardiologists can make.

She recalls the time she volunteered to give a brief talk at a predominantly black church in Brooklyn, New York. Many of the members, she said, had untreated heart problems - because they'd felt physicians didn't understand them or take them seriously.

"After that meeting, you would be surprised how m...

Though they are at a higher risk of childbirth complications and pregnancy-related death, women who are black, Hispanic or indigenous are less likely than white women to be insured, new research shows.

The study revealed that almost half of black, Hispanic and indigenous women had disruptions in insurance coverage between preconception and post-delivery compared to about one-quarter o...

U.S. immigration policies may put Hispanic teens' mental and physical health at risk, researchers say.

Of 547 U.S.-born Hispanic kids surveyed in Atlanta, one-quarter had a parent, aunt, uncle or other family member who was detained or deported in 2017 or 2018. Participants were questioned twice, six months apart.

Compared to other middle school- and high school-aged youth, ...

Foreign nationals in the United States are less likely to receive treatment for heart disease risk factors than native-born Americans or naturalized citizens, a new study reports.

Heart disease -- including heart attack and stroke -- is the leading cause of death among adults in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers...

Racial bias and stereotyping are common when researchers are recruiting people for cancer clinical trials, a new study finds.

"Examples of the stereotypes we observed included perceptions that African Americans were less knowledgeable about cancer research studies, less likely to participate due to altruism, or simply less likely to complete all facets of the research study," said stu...