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Results for search "Smoking Cessation".

09 Sep

Smoking Is Dangerous Whether You're A Heavy Smoker Or A Social Smoker

Social smokers face high risk of death from lung disease and lung cancer, study finds.

29 May

Vaping Ups Your Risk Of Gum Disease, New Study Finds.

Just a few months of vaping can put you on the brink of oral disease, researchers say.

23 Dec

Teens And Young Adults Are Underestimating The Health Risks From Vaping, New Survey Finds.

The majority of youth believe secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is harmless, according to the research.

Health News Results - 123

Teens Aren't Turning to E-Cigarettes to Quit Smoking

Most teens who vape aren't looking to quit smoking, a new study of Twitter suggests.

This finding belies Juul's claim that its e-cigarette is improving smokers' lives, the researchers said.

For the study, researchers analyzed more than 4,000 tweets and found that only 1% of Twitter users mentioned Juul as a way to stop smoking. Scarcely 7% mentioned any health bene...

Smoking Ups Your Risk of a Fatal Brain Bleed

Smokers have a significantly raised risk of dying from a bleeding stroke, a new study warns.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from over 16,000 same-sex twin pairs in Finland. The twins were born before 1958 and followed for about 42 years (between 1976 and 2018).

During the follow-up, there were 120 deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This is a type of bleedin...

Keep High Blood Pressure at Bay With Healthy Lifestyle

Want to fend off high blood pressure? New research adds to the pile of evidence showing that living healthy can help you avoid hypertension.

The study included nearly 3,000 Black and white U.S. adults, aged 45 and older, who didn't have high blood pressure at the start of the study.

The participants' heart health was assessed with the American Heart Association's Life's Sim...

Even 'Social Smokers' Up Their Odds of Death From Lung Disease

Even light smokers are much more likely to die of lung disease or lung cancer than nonsmokers, a new study warns.

"Everyone knows that smoking is bad for you, but it's easy to assume that if you only smoke a little, the risks won't be too high," said study co-leader Pallavi Balte, of Columbia University Irving Medical Center, in New York City.

The new study shows how wrong ...

Quit Smoking to Cut Risk of Death From A-Fib

Smokers with the most common type of heart rhythm disorder can reduce their risk of stroke and death by giving up cigarettes, a new study says.

"Smoking precipitates blood clots that could lead to a stroke, which may be why giving up lowers risk," said study author So-Ryoung Lee of Seoul National University Hospital in South Korea.

But even former smokers had higher odds for...

Women Smokers Less Likely to Get Cancer Screenings

Women smokers already have one bad habit. A new study finds another: They're less likely than others to go for cancer screenings.

Moreover, they're more likely to have spreading cancer when diagnosed, according to findings.

For the report, researchers collected data on more than 89,000 postmenopausal women who took part in a long-running U.S. study.

More than hal...

Nearly Half of U.S. Teens Who Vape Want to Quit

Addictive e-cigarettes have made inroads among American teens, and government campaigns to prevent vaping among the young are everywhere.

But a new survey suggests another focus: Helping teens already hooked on vaping to quit.

The survey of nearly 500 12- to 17-year-olds who vape found that almost half (44.5%) said they were "seriously thinking about quitting," with one ...

Less Smoking, Drinking Means Fewer Hip Fractures for Americans

In a rare bit of good health news for Americans, a new government study finds that hip fracture rates have fallen substantially since the 1970s.

Between 1970 and 2010, broken hips dropped by two-thirds among Americans in a decades-long health study. The likely reason? Researchers say drops in both smoking and heavy drinking played a significant role.

The improvement was true...

Smoking Raises Aneurysm Risk for Women

Smoking significantly increases a woman's risk of potentially deadly brain aneurysms, a new study warns.

An aneurysm is a weakened, bulging section of an artery. If an aneurysm ruptures, it can cause fatal bleeding.

The study included 545 women, aged 30 to 60, who had brain scans at five large teaching and research hospitals in the United States and Canada between 2016 and 2...

Flavored-Cigarette Ban Led to Smoking Decline Among Young Americans

Banning flavored cigarettes led to a large decline in smoking among U.S. teens and young adults, a new study suggests.

The U.S. ban on flavored cigarettes (other than menthol) took effect in September 2009. To find out how it affected teens and young adults, researchers analyzed data from the 2002-2017 U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

They found a 43% decline...

Under 50 and Had a Heart Attack? Quit Smoking, and You'll Live Longer

If you're a smoker under 50 and you suffer a heart attack, new research suggests kicking the habit may be the best thing you can do to still be around years later.

"These results are definitive: among young people who have had a heart attack, quitting smoking is associated with a substantial benefit," said corresponding author Dr. Ron Blankstein, from the division of cardiovascular me...

Ban Menthol Cigarettes, Lower Smoking Rates?

Want to make smoking less attractive to young people? Try taking menthol cigarettes off the market, a new analysis suggests.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned flavors in cigarettes in 2009 because flavors appeal to youth and young adults, and the agency recently announced that it also intends to ban menthol in cigarettes.

To assess what effect a ban on menthol cig...

There's No Healthy Alternative to Smoking Except Quitting: Study

Smoking is terrible for your heart and lungs, and simply switching to e-cigarettes won't do much good, a major new analysis finds.

That's especially true now amid the COVID-19 pandemic, experts added.

The only truly healthy way out for nicotine addicts is quitting, said a team led by Thomas Münzel, a cardiologist at University Medical Center in Mainz, Germany. His team...

5 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

A combination of healthy habits -- such as a good diet and regular exercise -- may lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease by as much as 60%, a new study suggests.

Data from nearly 3,000 people in the United States was scored on five beneficial lifestyle factors: high-quality diet, physical activity, not smoking, brain-challenging activities, and light-to-moderate alcohol consumpti...

Loneliness May Make Quitting Smoking Even Tougher

Being lonely may make it harder to quit smoking, a new British study suggests.

Using genetic and survey data from hundreds of thousands of people, researchers found that loneliness makes it more likely that someone will smoke. This type of analysis is called Mendelian randomization.

"This method has never been applied to this question before and so the results are novel, b...

Ex-Smokers Who Take Up Vaping Are More Prone to Relapse: Study

Far from helping them avoid cigarettes, longtime ex-smokers who try vaping are taking a big risk that they'll relapse, a new study finds.

People who've spent a year off smokes are nearly four times more likely to start lighting up again if they experiment with vaping, compared with those who don't, according to findings published June 5 in JAMA Network Open.

"Even sam...

Drug Could Boost Survival From Lung Cancer Affecting Non-Smokers

MONDAY, June 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The drug Tagrisso could offer hope to patients battling a form of lung cancer that typically hits people with little or no history of smoking, a new trial finds.

Taken after surgery to remove the lung tumor, Tagrisso (osimertinib) greatly extended the average survival of people battling a non-metastatic form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCL...

COVID-19 Is More Severe in Smokers

COVID-19 hits smokers much harder than nonsmokers, according to a new review.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), analyzed 19 studies that included data on smoking and severity of COVID-19 among nearly 11,600 patients in the United States, China and Korea.

Most patients were hospitalized, but two studies also included outpatients. Just over 6...

AHA News: Why Lighting Up and COVID-19 Don't Mix

As evidence continues to grow that people who smoke are at greater risk of dying from COVID-19, health professionals are turning to a familiar message with new urgency: There may be no better time to quit than today.

While researchers gather more data as the virus spreads, both the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified smoking as a ...

E-Cigarettes as Bad for Arteries as Regular Smokes, Study Finds

Electronic cigarettes are touted by some as safer than smoking tobacco. But a new study finds they damage blood vessels just like traditional cigarettes do.

Among hundreds of healthy young adults, researchers found that vaping and smoking cigarettes cause the same harm to arteries that leads to heart attacks, strokes and heart disease.

"The evidence is growing that e-cigar...

Cardiac Rehab Boosts Quality of Life After Heart Attack: Study

Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve heart attack survivors' quality of life, especially if they get lots of exercise, a new British study finds.

A heart attack can reduce quality of life due to struggles with mobility and self-care, as well as daily leisure and work activities.

Many heart attack survivors take part in cardiac rehab, which emphasizes exercise, quitting sm...

Smokers, Vapers in Special Danger From Coronavirus

Smokers and vapers who get COVID-19 are more likely to have complications, so this might be a good time to quit, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons says.

An early study from China looked at 78 hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Researchers found those with a history of smoking had 14 times the risk of needing a higher level care, requiring a ventilator, and/or dying.

COVID-19 dea...

The Sooner Young Smokers Start, The Less Likely They Are to Quit

Kids and teens who take up smoking are more likely to become daily smokers and find it harder to quit by their 40s, a new study finds.

"Based on our data coupled with a variety of other evidence, we found childhood smoking leads to adult smoking," said lead researcher David Jacobs Jr., a professor of public health at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. "Cigarette smoking, eve...

Women in Their 50s Can Lower Their Stroke Risk - Here's How

If you're a middle-aged woman, it's not too late to make lifestyle changes that could significantly reduce your risk of stroke, researchers say.

"We found that changing to a healthy lifestyle, even in your 50s, still has the potential to prevent strokes," said lead author Goodarz Danaei, an associate professor of cardiovascular health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

...

New, Graphic Health Warnings Coming for U.S. Cigarette Packs

Graphic new health warnings must appear on cigarette packages and in cigarette ads beginning next year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says.

As of June 18, 2021, the 11 new warnings must be displayed prominently, filling the top half of cigarette packages on both front and back and at least 20% of the area at the top of ads.

The warnings include text and pho...

Don't Wait, for Your Baby's Sake: Quit Smoking Before You're Pregnant

Even if a pregnant woman quits smoking in the first trimester, her baby is still at risk for a smaller body and head, a new study warns.

Researchers analyzed data from 1.4 million mother-child pairs in Finland to assess how smoking during pregnancy affects newborns.

"The most important finding of our study is that although quitting smoking in the first trimester reduces the ...

Patients Who Quit Smoking Before Weight-Loss Surgery Often Relapse: Study

Many people who quit smoking before having weight-loss surgery go back to cigarettes after the procedure, a new study finds.

Researchers followed 1,770 adults for seven years after they had weight-loss surgery at 10 U.S. hospitals. While about 14% smoked in the year before surgery, that fell to 2% in the month before their operation.

But the smoking rate rose to near...

Another HIV Hazard: Higher Risk for COPD

Adults with HIV have higher rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and are diagnosed with the lung disease years earlier than those without HIV, a new study finds.

Smoking may be a major reason why, researchers suggest.

"As people with HIV live longer, it is important to understand how common other illnesses are to ensure that prevention, screening and treatme...

Don't Try to Kick the Smoking Habit Alone

Going solo when trying to quit smoking isn't enough, one lung health expert says.

"Smokers develop a physiological dependence on nicotine, and they need more than willpower to quit," said Dr. Danish Ahmad, a pulmonologist with Penn State Health's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

The American Cancer Society says that smokers typically try quitting eight to 10 times before s...

Even After Stroke, Many Smokers Still Light Up

While fewer Americans are smoking these days, the habit has remained stubbornly persistent among stroke survivors, new research shows.

The researchers found that the prevalence of smoking among U.S. stroke survivors has not improved since 1999 and, as of 2016, stood at 26%.

That's in contrast to the trend among Americans in general, who are gradually leaving cigarettes b...

E-Cigarettes Popular Among Recent Quitters: Study

Smokers who recently quit tobacco cigarettes are much more likely to use e-cigarettes than those who quit more than a decade ago, a new study says.

The findings suggest that smokers who want to quit are now using e-cigarettes to help them, according to the authors. In the past, quitters had to rely on other smoking cessation aids.

"Duration of smoking cessation was a major d...

Vape Devices Like Juul 'Reversing' Efforts to Keep Youth From Tobacco: Study

The epidemic of addictive vaping among youth continues, with e-cigarette devices by Juul continuing to surge in popularity among teens and young adults, new research shows.

The number of Americans aged 15 to 34 who said they had at least tried one of the small, convenient Juul devices more than doubled between 2018 and 2019, researchers report.

And the number of current Juul...

Want a Long, Healthy Old Age? A Healthy Middle Age Helps

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

Switching to Vaping Isn't Quitting Smoking

If 2020 is the year you've resolved to quit smoking, don't start vaping.

No matter what e-cigarette companies advertise, their products aren't approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a safe and effective way to give up tobacco, the American Lung Association warns. And switching from tobacco to e-cigarettes isn't quitting.

"The simple truth is that e-cigarettes...

Trump Administration to Limit Access to Most Flavored E-Cigarettes

After months of delay, the Trump Administration announced Thursday that it will withdraw -- at least temporarily -- mint-, fruit- and dessert-flavored e-cigarette cartridges from the U.S. market.

"Starting in early February, FDA intends to prioritize enforcement against these illegally marketed products," Mitch Zeller, director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for To...

Tips to Keep New Year's Resolutions

Lose weight. Eat healthier. Quit smoking. These are all popular New Year's resolutions that are often only kept for a short time, if at all.

About 40% of Americans make a New Year's resolution, most of which are abandoned by February, according to researchers at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

But Bernadette Melnyk, vice president for health promotion and c...

Some Solid Advice on New Year's Resolutions That Might Stick

If you plan to make a New Year's resolution about improving your health, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some good suggestions.

"With too many holiday sweets and not enough exercise likely in the rearview mirror, now is the perfect time to consider your personal goals and how you can make positive health choices in the coming year," AMA President Dr. Patrice Harris said in ...

FDA Approves Sale of Low-Nicotine Cigarettes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the sale of two reduced nicotine cigarettes.

Moonlight and Moonlight Menthol cigarettes were given the green light because they contain much less nicotine than traditional cigarettes and they could help adult smokers kick the habit, the FDA said.

"Today's authorization represents the first product to successfully dem...

Vaping Could Up Risks for Asthma, COPD and Other Lung Diseases

As if the news on vaping wasn't bad enough, a new study suggests that e-cigarette users are also at significantly higher risk of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, bronchitis, emphysema and COPD.

Those risks rose even higher if vapers also smoked tobacco, researchers said.

"What we found is that for e-cigarette users, the odds of developing lung disease increased by about...

Healthy Lifestyle, Regular Screening May Keep Cancer at Bay

A healthy lifestyle might be your best defense against cancer, an expert says.

About 42% of cancer cases and 45% of cancer deaths are attributable to modifiable risk factors, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Modifiable risk factors are behaviors within one's control, such as eating right, not smoking, and being physically active," said Dr. Michael Hall, cha...

Vitamin E Compound Likely Culprit Behind Vaping Lung Illnesses, Study Finds

Over the past year, nearly 2,300 Americans have been sickened -- and 47 have died -- from a mysterious and severe lung illness tied to vaping.

Now, a study of lung illnesses in Minnesota supports the notion that a compound known as vitamin E acetate, present in many "black market" vape products, could be to blame.

The study found that while vitamin E acetate was not found in...

Doctors' Group Calls for Ban on Most Vaping Products

The American Medical Association (AMA) is calling for a ban on all e-cigarettes and vaping products not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help people quit smoking tobacco cigarettes.

The move is in response to a sharp rise in youth e-cigarette use and an outbreak of more than 2,000 illnesses and 40-plus deaths caused by vaping-related lung illness.

"The r...

Fewer Americans Than Ever Smoke, but Vaping Poses a Growing Threat: CDC

Cigarette smoking has reached an all-time low in the United States, but experts say the rise of vaping puts a damper on what otherwise would be a tremendous public health achievement.

Just under 14% of American adults smoked cigarettes in 2018, a dramatic decline from the 42% adult smoking rate in 1965, according to researchers with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Pre...

Trump Administration Wants to Raise Age to Buy E-Cigs to 21

Speaking outside the White House on Friday, President Donald Trump said his administration plans to raise the U.S. federal legal age to buy e-cigarettes from 18 to 21.

That's just one plank in the administration's new plan to curb youth vaping, Trump told reporters.

"We have to take care of our kids, most importantly, so we're going to have an age limit of 21 or so," the ...

1 in 4 High School Kids Vape, Mint Flavor Preferred

More than one in every four U.S. high school students (27.5%) currently vape, a new study shows.

About one-third of these teen vapers do so on a nearly daily basis, and nearly three-quarters favor flavored varieties of the addictive, nicotine-laden products.

And nearly 60% of high school students who currently vape use the popular Juul brand, according to researchers...

Still Way Too Much Smoking in Movies Aimed at Kids

Despite repeated calls from public health groups to cut smoking scenes on the silver screen, the number of "tobacco incidents" in PG-13 movies has risen by 120% over the past decade, a new report finds.

Much of the rise has occurred within a certain genre of film: biographical dramas. But even in these "biopics," characters aren't necessarily smoking because they represent a histo...

It May Be Even Tougher for Women to Quit Smoking Than Men

Smoking is a notoriously tough habit to quit, but a new study suggests it is far harder for women to stop than it is for men.

Why? The researchers point to a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression in women, which might interfere with even the best intentions to kick the habit. And one expert noted that prior evidence has shown that women's brains react differently to nicotine.

Teen Use of Flavored E-Cigarettes Keeps Rising

Coming on the heels of recent U.S. federal and state efforts to ban flavored e-cigarettes, a new report finds the percentage of American teenagers who've used these products continues to climb.

According to 2018 data, nearly 2.4 million middle and high school teens say they have used a flavored e-cigarette at least once over the past 30 days.

Among teens, "e-cigarettes were ...

'Toxic Fumes' May Be Driving Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses

As the number of cases and deaths tied to vaping-linked lung injury continues to rise across the United States, a meticulous examination of 17 such cases suggests a possible culprit.

All of the patients examined had severe forms of the illness, and two had died.

"Based on what we have seen in our study, we suspect that most cases involve chemical contaminants, toxic byproduc...

E-Cigarette Maker Juul Stops All Advertising, Replaces CEO

Amid a national outbreak of vaping-linked illnesses and deaths, vape device maker Juul Labs said Wednesday it is stopping all print, digital and television advertising, and its CEO, Kevin Burns, is stepping down.

Juul, by far the largest vaping products maker in the United States, also said it will not fight a proposed nationwide ban on flavored e-cigarettes, put forward earlier this ...

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