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Science Doesn't Always Boost Sales, Study Finds

Does science sell? Sometimes.

Using science to sell chocolate chip cookies and other yummy products is likely to backfire, a new study shows, but touting scientific research behind more practical, everyday items -- such as body wash -- can be an effective marketing strategy.

"People see science as cold, but competent. That doesn’t pair well with products designed to be warm and ...

Fooled by Fake News: Does Age Matter?

Older adults are no more likely to believe fake news than younger adults, with the exception of the very oldest, a new study finds.

Falling for fake news can have significant physical, emotional and financial consequences, especially for older adults who may have their life savings or serious medical issues at stake, the researchers said.

"We wanted to see if there was an age diff...

You Let Your Cat Out — Where Does It Roam?

Ever wonder where your cat wanders when you let it out? New research suggests your kitty most likely sticks close to home.

Scientists used GPS (global positioning system) to track the movements of nearly 100 pet cats in a small town in Eastern Norway when they were outside. All of the cats lived in homes within about one square kilometer.

The cats spent an average of 79% of their o...

Your Dog's Breed Has Little Influence on Behavior, Study Finds

For the past couple of centuries, humans have been breeding dogs to meet specific physical characteristics — to make Golden Retrievers fluffy, to make Rottweilers muscular, or to make Chihuahuas tiny.

Dog enthusias...

Behavior Differences Led to High COVID Death Rate in U.S. South: Study

Thousands of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. South could have been avoided if more people masked, social distanced, kept kids from school and made other behavioral changes to reduce the spread of the virus, researchers say.

In other words, if they had acted more like folks up North.

The study authors suggested that if the entire United States had followed the lead of the Northeast in t...

Teens on TikTok: Fun, But Addictive and Maybe Harmful

In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

But what exactly do those young users think of the app? Is it a boon to their self-esteem and creativity, or an addictive time-waster that crea...

Hair of the Dog: A Quick, Painless Stress Test for Pooches

The strange smells and sounds at an animal shelter can stress out even the most placid pup, and invasive tests to see if they need medicine to calm down only add to the anxiety.

So there's some good news for Fido in new research out of the Netherlands.

The study found that analyzing a single sample of a...

Family Structure Influences Teen Delinquency

The structure of teens' families influences their risk of delinquent behaviors such as shoplifting, graffiti or robbery, new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed survey data gathered between 2016 and 2019 from more than 3,800 14- and 15-year-olds in Sweden. They used a statistical measure called incident rate ratio, or IRR, to compare groups.

"This study shows...

Body & Mind: Rehab Psychologists Help When Illness, Injuries Strike

If you're recovering from a significant injury or illness, a rehabilitation therapist could be a big help in getting back to your normal daily life, according to experts.

"You don't get a manual that comes with your injury that tells you how to navigate returning to your usual pattern of functioning," said Brigid Waldron-Perrine, a rehabilitation psychologist at Michigan Medicine-Universi...

'Love Hormone' Turns Lions Into Placid Pussycats

The "love hormone" oxytocin may be able to turn highly territorial lions into social sweethearts, researchers say.

Lions typically guard their turf fiercely, which can be a problem when they're on reserves or in captivity and have less space to share than they do in the wild.

The authors of a study published online ...

Owners Can Play Big Role in Dogs' Problem Behaviors

Chasing light shimmers reflected onto a wall. Obsessive licking or chewing. Compulsive barking and whining. Pacing or tail chasing.

Nearly one in three pet dogs suffer from these ADHD-like repetitive behaviors — and researchers now suspect that an animal's home life could be...

Studies Relying on Brain Scans Are Often Unreliable, Analysis Shows

Most brain studies that rely on MRI scans don't include enough people to provide trustworthy results, researchers say.

These brain-wide association studies use MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to see how brain structure and function connect with personality, behavior, thinking, neurological conditions ...

Pandemic Didn't Dent Americans' Optimism, Polls Find

Despite the crushing challenges of navigating a worldwide pandemic during the past two years, Americans remain as optimistic as ever, a series of surveys shows.

The surveys were conducted between 2008 and 2020, and included 2.7 million adults who were asked to use a 10-point scale to rank their current life satisfaction, with 10...

Could the 'Love Hormone' Help Drive Sex Addiction in Men?

Men compelled to find myriad new partners and ways to have sex may be driven by high levels of the so-called "love hormone," oxytocin, new research suggests.

Oxytocin, which is produced by the hypothalamus and secreted by the pituitary gland, plays a key role in sexual behavior, and abnormal levels are believed...

'Dr. Chimp Will See You Now'? Primates Use Medicine, Study Suggests

Chimpanzees aren't monkeying around when they catch insects and place them on open wounds, researchers report.

An ongoing study of about 45 chimps in Loango National Park in Gabon is the first to document via video that such "healing" behavior is occurring, according to the team from Osnabrück University in Germany and the Ozouga Chimpanzee Project. The study was published Feb. 7 in the ...

Screens Near Bedtime Bad for Preschoolers' Sleep

It's crucial to keep preschoolers away from screens and other sources of light in the hour before bedtime if you want them to get a good night's sleep, researchers say.

That's because even a little bit of light exposure can trigger a sharp drop in the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin, according...

Getting Your School-Age Child Into a Healthy Sleep Routine

Most parents have dealt with having to hurry a sleepy child out the door on a school morning, but experts say taking the time to establish good sleep routines for your kids is worth the effort.

Amid the pandemic, there can be a great deal of uncertainty around school, but a set sleep regimen can help ease youngsters'

Extra 10 Minutes of Daily Activity Could Save 110,000 U.S. Lives Annually

Americans, get up out of that chair and get moving.

If everyone between 40 and 85 years of age were active just 10 minutes more a day, it could save more than 110,000 U.S. lives a year, a large study reports.

"Our projections are based on an additional 10 minutes of moderate to vi...

Pandemic to Endemic: Is a New Normal Near?

It has begun to feel like a pandemic that will never end, but public health experts now say the Omicron variant may be ushering in a "new normal," where COVID-19 becomes an endemic, but manageable, disease.

"I do feel that we are moving into a transition phase in the pandemic, and I do th...

3 Reasons Why Trying to Get COVID Is a Bad Idea

If you're wondering whether to intentionally expose yourself to the Omicron variant with the goal of developing immunity, the answer is absolutely not, experts say.

"It sounds like playing with fire to me," said Dr. Nicole Van Groningen, a hospitalist who has treated hundreds of COVID-19 patients at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles.

First of all, you do risk becoming severely ill, even t...

COVID Vaccine Hesitancy Falling Faster Among Black Americans Than Whites

While it appears that Black Americans were more hesitant than white Americans to roll up their sleeves when the COVID-19 vaccines launched last year, that unwillingness has lessened.

Following 1,200 U.S. adults through much of the pandemic, researchers found Black people were more likely to change their negative thinking about COVID-19 vaccination compared to white people.

Yet, aft...

Worries May Raise Men's Heart Risks, Even When Young

Worrying can take a toll on your psyche, but new research suggests that when middle-aged men fret too much, they face a higher risk for developing diabetes, heart disease or stroke down the road.

And this increase in risk is on par with the health risks linked to heavy drinking, the findings showed.

<...

U.S. Teens Were Already in Mental Health Crisis Before Pandemic Hit

MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Alaina Stanisci has grappled with an eating disorder since she was 10, and the disruptions of the pandemic only made things worse for the high school senior.

"I actually experienced a relapse at the beginning of the pandemic because of this lack of structure," Stanisci, 18, of Mountain Lakes, N.J., said during a HealthDay Now interview. "D...

Hit Your Head? Look for These Warning Signs of Concussion

If you or someone you know has suffered a concussion, a medical evaluation is crucial, an expert says.

A concussion is "a short-lived functional brain injury typically caused by a bump or blow to the head," Cleveland Clinic con...

Visiting a 'Dental Fear' Clinic Can Help Improve a Child's Smile

If the sound of a dental drill sends shivers up your spine, you're likely in good company: Finnish researchers say that one of every two adults fear the dentist at least a little, while one in 10 are very afraid.

But the researchers added that a local dentistry program has found a novel way to turn screams into smiles, by exposing patients as young as 2 to a series of desensitizing exams ...

Binge-Watching Could Raise Your Blood Clot Risk

Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

"Prolonged TV viewing, which involves immobilization, may increase the risk of venous thromboembolism,...

Do You Feel Old? It Could Be Aging You

People who believe their bodies and minds will break down with age may be creating a self-fulfilling prophecy, a recent study suggests.

Researchers found that older adults with a dim outlook on aging tended to report more physical health symptoms on days when they were stressed out than on less stressful days.

In contrast, people with more of a "golden years" perspective seemed to h...

Politics Clouds Folks' Views on COVID Rules, Global Survey Confirms

People's political views do affect their opinions about COVID-19 policies, a new study confirms, but researchers also found that advice from trusted experts can override those political biases.

"These findings underscore how important it is to have communications come from scientific sources that are not seen as political and to keep prominent politicians out of the spotlight of crisis co...

COVID Fatigue: Are You Among the 'Vaxxed & Done'?

You've gotten vaccinated. You've gotten boosted. You wear your mask, maintain social distancing, wash your hands -- you do everything you've been asked to do to protect yourself and others.

And you are completely fed up.

If that description sounds like you, you might be part of a contingent of people who consider themselves "vaxxed and done" with the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 17, 2022
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  • Kids' Behavior Worsened With Remote Learning: Study

    Parents, brace yourselves.

    As the Omicron variant surges and U.S. schools deal with a substitute teacher shortage and related pandemic fallout, don't be surprised if a return to remote or hybrid learning leads your kids to act out, a new study warns.

    Previous shifts from in-person to re...

    Too Much Sitting Could Mean Worse Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    Beating cancer is a huge feat, but how survivors live their lives afterwards also influences their longevity. A new study shows those who sit too much and are not physically active are much more likely to die early from cancer or any other cause than those who are more active.

    Data on c...

    Unlucky in Love? It Can Damage Men's Health, Study Finds

    Men who are broken-hearted or just unlucky in love could be more likely to have health-damaging inflammation, new research suggests.

    Serious breakups and solo living for many years may increase the risk of ill health and death -- but apparently only for men, according to the researchers behind a new Danish study.

    "Small numbers of breakups or years lived alone is not in itself a ri...

    Do Kids Act Better When School Uniforms Are the Norm? Maybe Not

    Ask a teacher whether school uniforms make a difference in their classrooms, and many are sure of it.

    They insist those crisp shirts and ties and those modest plaid skirts help kids focus on their classwork, level the playing field and boost attendance, among other perks.

    But a new study says it's just not so.

    Turns ou...

    How Long Do Lockdowns Keep People at Home?

    Lockdowns keep people home for a few weeks, but they lose their luster after a few months, claims a new study that comes as many countries consider a return to lockdowns to slow the renewed spread of COVID-19.

    The findings could be used by policymakers when deciding whether to impose lockdowns, the research...

    12 Steps to the Best Holiday Gift: Health

    Give yourself and your loved ones the gifts of health and safety this holiday season, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

    The agency outlines 12 ways to do that, beginning with a reminder that washing your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds helps prevent the spread of germs. That precaution is particularly important as the Omicron var...

    Heavier Drinking During Pandemic Means More Liver Disease to Come

    It's clear that COVID-19 has killed many hundreds of thousands of people in the United States. Less clear is its impact on other health issues, which will be felt in the years to come.

    Liver disease is projected to be one of those, with 8,000 additional deaths from

    'You Didn't Tag Me!' Instagram Snubs Hurt, Study Confirms

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    Big Review Confirms Power of Fasting Diets for Weight Loss

    Intermittent fasting is all the rage due to its potential health benefits, and now a new review shows this style of eating really does produce weight loss and may even improve certain markers of heart health.

    Intermittent fasting is an umbrella ...

    Don't Let Heartburn Ruin Your Holiday Feast

    Like Mr. Grinch, heartburn can crush your holiday, but there are easy ways to prevent it.

    "Heartburn is caused by acidic stomach content moving into the esophagus, or gullet, which is much less resistant to acid," said Dr. James East, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London. "This results in irritation and damage to the lining of the esophagus, literally a burn, that caus...

    Pandemic Saw Big Declines in Kids' Use of Drugs, Alcohol, Vaping

    There may be a silver lining to the COVID-19 pandemic, with U.S. health officials reporting an "unprecedented" decline in teens' use of alcohol, marijuana, other illegal drugs and vaping.

    "We have never seen such dramatic decreases in drug use among teens in just a one-year period," said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse.

    "These data are unpreced...

    Stress May Be Stronger Trigger for Problem Drinking in Women Than Men

    When someone says "I need a drink," it's usually because they've had a rough day. Now, new research suggests that stress is more likely to trigger heavy drinking in women than in men.

    "Some people can intend to have one or two alcoholic beverages and stop drinking, but other people just keep going," said study leader Julie Patock-Peckham. She's head of the Social Addictions Impulse Lab at...

    Pandemic-Linked Rise in Crime Hit America's Poor Neighborhoods Hardest

    Poor neighborhoods of color bore the brunt of a surge in violent crime in U.S. cities early in the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    "This study adds to the mounting body of research showing that equal opportunities -- including the opportunity to live, work, learn, play and worship free from...

    Pandemic Brought Big Rise in New Cases of Anorexia

    A new study confirms yet another consequence of the pandemic for children and teenagers: Eating disorders, and hospitalizations for them, rose sharply in 2020.

    The study of six hospitals across Canada found new diagnoses of anorexia nearly doubled during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. And the rate of hospitalization among those patients was almost threefold higher, versus pre-pa...

    T-Shirt Study Shows Importance of Mom's Smell to Bond With Baby

    The sound of mom's voice can soothe a fussy baby like nothing else, but now new research suggests that an infant is also calmed by the scent of its mother.

    Prior animal studies had already shown that olfaction -- smell -- "is very important, that mother's smell is very critical for attachment," noted study author Ruth Feldman. "Young recognize mother by her smell, and mother and habitat a...

    Holidays Are Peak Time for Heart Attack: Protect Yourself

    This time of year can be hard on the heart.

    The United States has more heart attack deaths between Christmas and New Year's Day than at any other time of year, so the American Heart Association (AHA) offers some holiday health tips.

    "The holidays are a busy, often stressful, time for most of us," said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, volunteer president of the

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  • December 12, 2021
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  • Half of U.S. Parents of Teens Got Their Child Vaccinated, But Uptake Slows

    Nearly half of 12- to 17-year-olds in the United States have had at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot, but the initial rush to get teens immunized has stalled, a new survey of parents shows.

    Only 1% of parents now plan to get their teen vaccinated as soon as possible; 13% said they'll wait and see how vaccination works for others; and 30% said they won't get their teen vaccinated.

    The...

    Who Gets a Flu Shot? Having a Doctor Is Key

    Public health experts have long recommended getting a seasonal flu shot, but a new study suggests there's hesitancy about that vaccine, too. Physicians and pharmacists can play a key role in flu shot uptake, the research shows.

    Only about 44% of people who had a health care provider got their flu shots, the study found, but it was even worse among those who didn't have a doctor: Only one...

    Half of Drinkers Who Think They're Fit to Drive Are Wrong: Study

    If you think you're fine to drive after drinking, there's a good chance you're wrong, new research shows.

    The study found that despite being over the legal driving limit, half of the participants believed they were safe to drive.

    The study included 90 volunteers, average age 24, in Germany who drank either wine or beer until they reached a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrAC)...

    Clearing Out Clutter Might Not Help People With Dementia

    You might think de-cluttering would make it easier for people with dementia to do daily tasks. Not so, says a new study from the United Kingdom.

    "It is generally assumed that a person with dementia will be better able to carry out daily tasks when their home space is tidy and clutter-free," said Eneida Mioshi, a professor in the School of Health Sciences at University of East Anglia (UEA)...

    Most Vaccinated Adults Plan to Get Boosters: Poll

    Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

    Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of vaccinated adults have already received a booster shot in the United States, up sharply from October when it was 10%.

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