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Results for search "Behavior".

Health News Results - 487

Even Untrained Dogs Seem to Know Human Gestures

There's more evidence that the canine-human bond is a tight one: New research finds that stray dogs pick up on human commands, even though they haven't been trained.

Of the untrained dogs in the study, 80% went to the place a person pointed to. This suggests dogs understand complex gestures by watching humans, which might be a clue to reducing conflict between stray dogs and peop...

Why Tidying Up Is Sometimes Harder Than Expected

If you can't quite bring yourself to declutter your home and toss out unneeded possessions, one reason why might surprise you.

Researchers say the emotional tug you feel might be loneliness.

"When consumers make decisions about how to get rid of multiple possessions, perhaps when they are moving, it is a time when they are likely to feel lonely," said Catherine Cole. She's a...

More Than Half of Cancer Survivors Don't Abstain From Alcohol

U.S. cancer survivors have surprisingly high rates of alcohol use, researchers say.

"This study highlights the prevalence of current alcohol use among cancer survivors, including an increase in alcohol intake over time and higher rates among younger cancer survivors," said Dr. Crystal Denlinger, chief of GI Medical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

"As al...

What Works Best to Help Men With Overactive Bladder?

Learning how to control the urge to urinate may be all the therapy men need to treat an overactive bladder, a new study suggests.

A combination of drugs and behavioral therapy seems to work better than drugs alone, but behavioral therapy alone also worked better than drugs, the researchers found.

The trial of 204 men with overactive bladder suggests behavioral therapy may b...

Processed Foods Are Making Americans Obese

The convenience and lower cost of processed foods is hard to resist. But ready-to-eat meals and snacks are making Americans obese and unhealthy, a new study suggests.

As more people eat cheaper processed foods, they are getting fatter, said researcher Leigh Frame, from George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Washington, D.C.

Frame and a colleague anal...

Green Tea Drinkers May Live Longer

People who love their green tea may also enjoy longer, healthier lives, a large new study suggests.

Researchers found that of more than 100,000 Chinese adults they tracked, those who drank green tea at least three times a week were less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke over the next seven years.

Tea lovers also had a slightly longer life expectancy. At age 50, they ...

Opioid Use By Teens a Red Flag for Other Dangers

Teenagers who've experimented with opioid painkillers are likely to be taking other health risks, a new study finds.

In a national survey of U.S. high school students, 14% said they had ever "misused" a prescription opioid such as Vicodin, OxyContin or Percocet. And those teenagers were much more likely than their peers to admit to taking a range of risks -- from abusing other dru...

New Year's Resolutions Didn't Stick? Try a Monday Reset

You made your resolution -- this year was finally going to be the year you lost weight. But then your neighbor stopped by with a plate of cookies, and well, your resolve didn't even last a day. Maybe next year?

But instead of looking at your resolutions as a sweeping year-long project, what if you concentrated on making healthy changes every Monday? That way, if you slip up and dive ...

Expectations for New Star Wars Movie Could Sway Your Viewing Pleasure

Millions of Americans have filled movie theaters over the holidays to watch the latest in the Star Wars saga, but a new study suggests that enjoyment of the film may be governed by prior expectations.

To see how expectations affect viewing pleasure, researchers surveyed 441 people before and after they saw "Star Wars: Episode VIII -- The Last Jedi" in 2017.

Based on the resu...

Tips to Keep New Year's Resolutions

Lose weight. Eat healthier. Quit smoking. These are all popular New Year's resolutions that are often only kept for a short time, if at all.

About 40% of Americans make a New Year's resolution, most of which are abandoned by February, according to researchers at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

But Bernadette Melnyk, vice president for health promotion and c...

Most Young Vapers Aren't Using E-Cigs to Quit Smoking: Survey

Electronic cigarettes are marketed as an aid to quitting smoking, but most young people who vape say that's not why they indulge.

Instead, six out of 10 said they vape to relax and they'd miss the stress relief of vaping if they quit, a new survey sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) shows.

"We're hearing this narrative that people are vaping to qui...

More U.S. Teens Are Vaping Pot

As electronic-cigarette use has soared among America's teens, so too has the number vaping marijuana, two new reports indicate.

A team from the University of Nebraska found youth use of pot in e-cigarettes rose from 11% in 2017 to 15% one year later. And University of Michigan researchers found that in 2019, 14% of 12th graders reported marijuana vaping in the prior month...

ADHD in Childhood May Mean Financial Struggles Later

Children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to lag behind their peers long after they leave school, earning less as adults and living with their parents longer, a new study finds.

This is often true even if the hallmark symptoms of the disorder -- including inability to focus, hyperactivity, fidgetiness and impulsivity -- appear to have abated.

...

What If 'Exercise Needed to Burn Off Calories' Was Included on Food Labeling?

Would you change your grocery list if a food label said "Walk an hour to burn off the calories in this product"?

That's the idea behind a new push to include food labeling that describes the amount of exercise needed to burn off calories consumed, the researchers behind a new study said.

This labeling approach "is a simple strategy that could be easily included on food/bever...

Have a Purpose, Have a Healthier Life

Do you feel like you know why you're here?

The answer to that question could determine how you feel day-to-day.

If you've found meaning in your life, you're more likely to be both physically and mentally healthy, a new study reports.

On the other hand, people restlessly searching for meaning in their life are more likely to have worse mental well-being, with their ...

Who's More Apt to Be a Narcissist -- the Young or the Old?

Know any folks who are just too full of themselves? Rest assured: They'll probably get over it eventually.

That's because narcissism tends to decline with age, according to what researchers described as the longest study ever of the personality disorder.

For the study, a Michigan State University team looked at nearly 750 people to assess how narcissism changed between ages...

What Is Your Cat Trying to Tell You? 'Cat Whisperers' Know

Only a few people seem able to decipher what most people consider unreadable expressions on cats' faces, researchers find.

These "cat whisperers" can discern subtle differences on feline faces that reveal their mood. Women and people in the veterinary field, but not necessarily cat lovers, are most likely to have this ability.

"The ability to read animals' facial expressions...

As Diabetes Costs Soar, Many Turn to Black Market for Help

Skyrocketing prices and insurance limits are driving many people with diabetes to seek medications and supplies from an underground supply chain, a new study found.

"The cost of insulin, which is required in type 1 diabetes and a subset of type 2 diabetes, has increased substantially over the last decade. As the price of insulin rises and insurance premiums and deductibles go up, too...

1 in 18 U.S. Teens Carries a Gun to School: Study

Fifteen million kids attend high school in the United States, and around 1 in 18 goes armed with a gun, a new study finds.

That's nearly 1 million teens taking a potentially deadly weapon to school. But researchers say universal background checks can put a dent in those numbers.

While gun-toting teens were found in every state, 83% were in states that did not have unive...

Sex Isn't Always What Drives 'Sexting'

"Sexting" may sound salacious, but it isn't always about sex, a new study shows.

In fact, two-thirds of adults who send these sexually oriented text messages don't have sex in mind at all, the Texas Tech University researchers report.

Some sexting is about foreplay for sex later on. Sexting is also used for reassurance about the relationship. And sometimes it's done to scor...

Gunshot Survivors May Struggle With Emotional Aftermath for Years

Even years after a gunshot wound heals, shooting survivors may be at greater risk of alcohol abuse, drug abuse and unemployment, new research finds.

The study of more than 180 gunshot victims also found that nearly half appeared to have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) years after the incident.

"The effects of gunshot injuries go beyond mortality statistics and function...

Could Fish Oil Be an ADHD Remedy for Some Kids?

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and low blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids might benefit from supplements, new research suggests.

Fish oil supplements appeared to boost attention in these kids, British researchers report.

The effect seemed limited to youngsters who weren't already getting enough omega-3 in their diets, however.

Prior ...

Grandma Isn't So Lonely After All

Even though older adults may have smaller social networks than younger adults, they have similar numbers of close friends and levels of well-being, a new study finds.

"Stereotypes of aging tend to paint older adults in many cultures as sad and lonely," said study lead author Wandi Bruine de Bruin, of the University of Leeds in England.

"But the research shows that older adul...

Not Getting Enough Shut-Eye? You Have Plenty of Company

More Americans are having trouble falling and staying asleep, and smartphones and technology are probably to blame, researchers report.

Their analysis of data from nearly 165,000 adults nationwide showed that the number who reported difficulty falling asleep at least once a week was up 1.4% between 2013 and 2017, and those who had trouble staying asleep rose 2.7%.

Th...

Exercise Can Help Prevent Depression, Even for Those at High Risk

Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

But that was less likely for people who were more active at the study's ...

Get Healthier With a Mental Reset

Making the decision to live healthier often involves important steps such as losing weight and exercising more. These are significant goals and everyday lifestyle habits that you should commit to. But there's another type of "makeover" that can benefit you in equally important ways.

That's changing your general outlook on life by boosting positivity. This mental tweak will put you in ...

Too Little Time to Exercise? Survey Suggests Otherwise

"I'd love to exercise more, but I just can't find the time."

It's a common refrain from many Americans but, for most, it might also be untrue, a new survey finds.

Researchers at the nonprofit RAND Corporation polled more than 32,000 Americans over the age of 14.

The survey found that, generally, people have an average of more than five hours of leisure time per day...

Ban on Sale of Sugary Drinks Trimmed Employees' Waistlines

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Pain Twice as Common for Kids With Autism: Study

Children with an autism spectrum disorder may be twice as likely to experience pain as kids without autism, a new study suggests.

"Pain is a common but under-recognized experience for children with autism," said researcher Danielle Shapiro. She is an assistant professor of clinical psychology at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

Children with autism may experienc...

The Wellness Boost of a Purposeful Life

Research has long shown how psychological disorders lead to poor physical health. Now scientists are learning more about the flip side of emotions, how living a purposeful life may have as many physical benefits as inspirational ones.

Having purpose in life is simply believing that your life has meaning and that you live according to goals you set for yourself.

One study fo...

What Helps Calm Agitated Dementia Patients?

Dealing with the agitation, anxiety and aggression that often come with dementia is one of the most challenging aspects of caring for someone with this brain disorder. But new research suggests that massage and other non-drug treatments may be more effective than medications.

Even just taking people with dementia outdoors can help, said study author Dr. Jennifer Watt, a geriatrician ...

Suicide Attempts Rising Among Black Teens

Historically, black teenagers in the United States have had lower suicide rates than whites. But a new study finds that more black teens have been attempting suicide in recent years -- and experts are not sure why.

Researchers at New York University found that between 1991 and 2017, there was an increase in the number of black teenagers who said they'd att...

Veggies' Popularity Is All in the Name

How do you make healthy food more popular? Start by giving it a yummy-sounding name, researchers say.

People are much more likely to choose good-for-you foods like broccoli or carrots if labeled with names that emphasize taste over nutritional value, according to Alia Crum, an assistant professor of psychology at Stanford University, and her colleagues.

In previous research...

Pressuring Kids to Diet Can Backfire, Damaging Long-Term Health

Parents want the best for their children. Eat well. Get enough sleep. Exercise. But sometimes pressuring your teen to diet or lose weight may end up harming them, a new study suggests.

It found that parents who urge their kids to diet might actually be boosting their odds for obesity later in life. It's also tied to an increased risk for eating disorders.

The phenomenon can ...

Better Sleep Equals Better Grades in College

College kids who get good shuteye may stand a better chance of making the Dean's list, a new study finds.

"The fact that there was a correlation between sleep and performance wasn't surprising, but the extent of it was," said researcher Jeffrey Grossman. He's a professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

It...

Troublesome Teen? Try Changing Your Tone

If your teenager won't cooperate, Mom, it might just be your tone of voice.

Speaking in a controlling tone unleashes a range of negative emotions in your son or daughter and pushes him or her away, researchers warn.

For the study of more than 1,000 14- and 15-year-olds, British researchers asked mothers to give their teens instructions using the same words, but different to...

Pediatric Group Issues Updated ADHD Guidelines

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is in the news a lot, and now newer research has prompted a leading pediatricians' group to update its guidelines for diagnosing and treating the disorder for the first time since 2011.

Dr. Mark Wolraich, lead author of the guidelines, noted that there weren't any dramatic differences between these and previous guidelines. But, he said,...

Like Kids and Dogs, Your Cat Really Does Need You

Your cat may often act indifferent, but deep down, Fluffy is as attached to you as your child or your dog, new research shows.

The finding suggests bonding goes beyond species, the researchers said.

"In both dogs and cats, attachment to humans may represent an adaptation of the offspring-caretaker bond," said Kristyn Vitale. She's a researcher in the Human-Animal Interaction...

Age Often Dampens Narcissists' Self-Love, Study Finds

Narcissism is not a good look at any age, but new research suggests it fades as people enter their 40s.

However, the degree of decline in narcissism varies between individuals and can be related to their career and relationships, the researchers added.

Overall, the "findings should bring comfort to those who are concerned that young people are problematically narcissistic," ...

Adult Support Can Make the Difference for Boys From Tough Neighborhoods

Strong adult social support can help prevent violence among teen boys growing up in poor neighborhoods, new research shows.

The study included nearly 900 boys in poor areas of Pittsburgh, aged 13 to 19, who took part in a sexual violence prevention trial.

The researchers looked at 40 risk behaviors in categories such as youth violence, bullying, sexual and/or dating violen...

What Fuels Your Appetite for Taking a Gamble?

Variations in brain activity when a person is idle may affect their decisions about risky behavior, according to a new study.

The findings may help explain why people are inconsistent -- and sometimes irrational -- and could lead to new treatments for gambling addiction, the researchers said.

"Experts have long struggled to explain why people are so erratic, making one decis...

Don't Blame Technology for Young People's Mood Problems: Study

Spending time on their phones or online doesn't harm teens' mental health, according to a new study that challenges a widely held belief.

"It may be time for adults to stop arguing over whether smartphones and social media are good or bad for teens' mental health and start figuring out ways to best support them in both their offline and online lives," said study co-author Candice Odg...

Nurturing Childhood Boosts Odds of a Happy Adult Life: Study

Kids who grow up confident that their parents, friends and community have their back are far less likely to struggle with depression or other serious mental health issues as adults, new research indicates.

The survey of nearly 6,200 adults also found that bad experiences, such as emotional or physical abuse, don't inevitably doom kids to a difficult adulthood. When children who have e...

Lifestyle May Matter More Than Your Genes in Early Heart Disease

An unhealthy lifestyle is a bigger contributor to heart disease than genetics for many younger adults, according to a new study.

The findings show that good health habits should be a key part of prevention efforts, even in people with a family history of early heart disease, researchers said.

The study included 1,075 people under age 50. Of those,...

'Fast and Feast' Diet Works for Weight Loss

Tired of that spare tire?

Low-calorie diets work, but can be difficult to follow. A much simpler approach to losing weight might be to just stop eating every other day.

It's called alternate-day fasting (ADF). As the name implies, you starve yourself by fasting one day and then you feast the next, and then repeat that pattern again and again.

In just the month-lo...

Why ADHD Might Raise the Risk of Early Death

Swedish researchers think they have honed in on why people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to die prematurely.

Accidental injuries, suicide and substance abuse all play a part, and psychiatric problems fuel these factors, a new study from the Karolinska Institute suggests.

To arrive at that conclusion, the researchers examined data from n...

How to Get on Track When Weekend Eating Is Your Downfall

Do you eat healthy during the week, then ease off the brakes on the weekend? You're not alone.

But such a five days on-two days off eating regimen can erode diet quality, according to a study published recently in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Not only did participants take in more calories on weekends than on weekdays, they were less healthy calories, ...

The 4 Keys to Emotional Well-Being

If you're satisfied with your life, you probably have emotional well-being.

Emotional well-being can be mastered just like any other skill, according to Richard Davidson, founder of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How? By developing four key traits, said Davidson, a neuroscientist.

The first is resili...

Are You an 'Extreme Early Bird'?

Early to bed and early to rise? In its extreme form, this tendency is more common than previously believed, according to a new study.

Going to sleep at 8 p.m. and waking up as early as 4 a.m. is called advanced sleep phase. It was believed to be rare, but this study concluded that it may affect at least one in 300 adults.

In advanced sleep phase, your body clock (circadian r...

Nearly Half of U.S. Patients Keep Vital Secrets From Their Doctors

Nearly half of U.S. patients don't tell their physicians about potentially life-threatening risks such as domestic violence, sexual assault, depression or thoughts of suicide, a new study finds.

"For physicians to achieve your best health, they need to know what you are struggling with," said study senior author Angela Fagerlin.

Understanding how to make patients feel more ...

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