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Health News Results - 219

Black and Hispanic women who work as hairdressers are exposed to an array of chemicals, including many that have not been previously identified, a small study finds.

Researchers found that compared with women of color in office jobs, hair stylists had higher levels of various chemicals in their urine. Those substances included expected ones -- ingredients known to be in salon products -- ...

One-third of public health workers have endured threats, anger and aggression from the public during the pandemic, and that has come at a steep cost to their mental health, a new study finds.

“The negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on workers have been documented and the research on psychological impacts is building,” said lead study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 25, 2023
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  • Long COVID has taken a heavy toll on the U.S. workforce, a new report shows.

    The New York State Insurance Fund's analysis of workers' compensation claims found that long COVID was preventing workers from returning to their jobs, or they were going back but with symptoms that might affect their performance.

    A full 71% of workers' ...

    Whether your job is remote or takes you to an office, you'll feel better and offset joint pain by having a workspace that's designed to work for you instead of against you.

    The biggest problem isn’t sitting itself but holding a single position for long periods often with a posture that causes strain, such as leaning forward, said

    Diets higher in fruit, vegetables and omega-3 fatty acids could improve astronaut health during long spaceflights while still sticking to requirements for what can go on board, according to new research.

    A new study tested this theory on a spaceflight simulation chamber on Earth with 16 people: 10 men and six women.

    Four individuals participated in each 45-day, Earth-based, closed-...

    While shift workers aren't more likely to get infected with COVID-19, they are more likely to suffer from severe disease requiring hospitalization, researchers warn.

    Norwegian scientists studied the risks of both shift workers and people who worked in face-to-face jobs in terms of COVID-19 infection and severity. They did this through online surveys of more than 7,100 people from 16 count...

    Capitalism is thought to bring out the best in workers, but there's a dark side to tying a person's everyday efforts to their weekly paycheck.

    Folks relying on short-term, freelanced office jobs, or jobs where pay is linked to hustle -- depending largely on tips, commissions and bonuses -- may often suffer poor health related to their financial insecurity, new research has shown.

    Em...

    The air where you work could be increasing your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests.

    Breathing in the fumes from commercial vapors, gases and solvents -- and even common dusts found in the workplace -- appears to increase chances of the chronic autoimmune joint disorder, researchers reported Dec. 6 in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 9, 2022
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  • The nationwide shortage of health care professionals -- a so-called "Great Resignation" of providers -- is impacting patient care in ways large and small, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll shows.

    One in four Americans (25%) have noticed or personally experienced the impact of staffing shortages in health care, second only to staff shortages in the retail sector (35%), the poll found.

    Equipping offices with "healthier" furnishings could reduce human exposure to risky PFAS chemicals, new research suggests.

    To look at indoor PFAS levels, a team led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston, analyzed building dust in classrooms and common campus spaces.

    “Our findings provide desperately needed scientific evidence for the success of healthier material...

    For women, the key to getting ahead at work could be getting more shut-eye.

    Quality sleep boosted women's moods, which then made them more intent on work achievements, a new study found.

    Researchers from Washington State University and University of Minnesota-Duluth surveyed 135 U.S. workers (men and women) twice a day for over two weeks to study this issue, gaining 2,200 observa...

    Universities sometimes offer "Pet Your Stress Away" events offering a chance to relax while gently patting the head and stroking the back of a calm dog.

    But some people are more interested in interacting with cats than dogs, according to a new study that linked preference to personality type.

    Training to become a doctor can be grueling, and now a new study finds a direct correlation between longer work hours and depression symptoms in first-year residents.

    Medical residency -- the training that new doctors undergo at hospitals or clinics -- is infamous for its

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 24, 2022
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  • Just about anyone who's ever dealt with a toxic work environment can tel you about the toll it takes on your physical and mental health.

    Now, the U.S. government is backing that perception up with some evidence.

    U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy released a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 21, 2022
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  • As some workplaces have added robots to the crew, workers in the United States and parts of Asia are feeling uneasy.

    Concerns about robots also happen even in industries where they're not used yet, according to new research.

    “Some economists theorize that robots are more likely to take over blue-collar jobs faster than whit...

    "Time-restricted" eating is a popular way to lose weight, and a new study suggests it can offer shift-workers a way to eat more healthfully.

    Time-restricted eating is a form of intermittent fasting, where people limit themselves to eating within...

    Getting up on the wrong side of bed can happen to the best of folks. Not everyone greets every morning with a sunny disposition and big smile.

    But when a bad mood overlaps with work, many people feel pressured to just snap out of it and "get happy."

    New research suggests that forcing that sort of an <...

    Staring at a computer screen endlessly can lead to dry, irritated, tired eyes and headaches.

    But there's a quick fix.

    Just look away from the screen every 20 minutes. Do this for at least 20 seconds, and look about 20 feet in the distance.

    Experts have suggested the 20-20-20 rule for a long time. No...

    People who work in manufacturing, welding and chemical operations and are exposed to hazardous chemicals may face a higher risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study found.

    "This study shows that certain occupational settings and exposures increase one's chances of...

    Access to paid sick leave saves lives, new research shows.

    The U.S. study found that when local laws required employers to provide paid sick leave, lower death rates from homicide, suicide and alcohol-related causes resulted.

    The researchers also believe that recent upticks in death rates -- up 6% between 2010 and 2017 -- among U.S. workers likely stem from state preemption laws, wh...

    In yet another example of the financial toll that the new coronavirus has exacted during the pandemic, a new report estimates that up to 4 million Americans are out of work as they struggle with long COVID.

    "This is a shocking number," report auth...

    U.S. workers without paid leave lost out on an estimated $28 billion in wages during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report.

    The analysis showed that the greatest increases in unpaid absences were among low-income workers who were self-employed,...

    Women who are their own bosses might have healthier hearts to show for it, a new study suggests.

    The study, of more than 4,600 working U.S. women, found that those who were self-employed typically got more exercise and were less likely to be obese or have

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.

    And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a new Cornell University study.

    Analysis of public opinion ...

    Don't be afraid of Sunday night.

    Good sleep habits can ward off the so-called “Sunday scaries” — the worry about returning to work on Monday morning that keeps many folks tossing and turning on Sunday night.

    A recent American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 1, 2022
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  • Harried, overworked anesthesiologists could be raising hospital patients' risk of death and complications, a new study reports.

    It's not uncommon to have one anesthesiologist directing the anesthesia care for multiple surgeries at the same time, overseeing the work of lower-ranking anesthesia clinicians assi...

    Medical schools are doing a better job of recruiting minority students, but they still struggle to keep those would-be doctors on...

    It takes much less than a "Matrix" plot to make American workers afraid for their jobs: New research reveals they stress out when they have to work alongside robots.

    Even though many robots took on the most dangero...

    U.S. veterans are at higher risk for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, than most Americans, and new research finds they are also more likely to have advanced-stage disease when it's detected.

    At the time of diagnosis, "we found veterans with melanoma were more like...

    It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

    Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

    This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

    Nearly 1 in 4 hospital doctors are mistreated at work by patients, visitors and other doctors, and female doctors are nearly two times more likely than male doctors to face this abuse, a new study reveals.

    "All members of the health care team share the r...

    Frontline nurses were plagued by "moral distress" in the early days of the pandemic because they lacked the support to provide high-quality care, a new report reveals.

    Between May and September 2020, researchers interviewed 100 nurses across the United States who cared for COVID-19 patients.

    The nurses reported moral distress caused by knowing how to treat patients and protect thems...

    Zoom meetings became the lifeblood of many workplaces during pandemic, but a new study points to a downside: They may limit employees' capacity for creative thinking.

    In experiments with workers in several countries, researchers found two broad phenomenon: Coworkers te...

    Women are less likely than men to head back to their jobs after recovering from a severe stroke, but researchers say the reasons for that difference are unclear.

    "Returning to work after a severe stroke is a sign of successful

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2022
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  • U.S. health care workers were most likely to be infected with COVID-19 at work during the pandemic's first year, according to a new study that challenges previous research suggesting their risk was highest off the job.

    Researchers said their findings could help guide efforts to better protect ...

    The pandemic has worsened longstanding staffing shortages at U.S. nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. Now, a new study shows that high employee turnover rates have yet to improve.

    Researchers found that after initial workforce losses in the early phase of the pandemic, U.S. ...

    Health care workers battling the pandemic may be suffering moral traumas at a rate similar to soldiers in a war zone, a new study suggests.

    The pandemic has brought a stream of stories about overtaxed health care workers, facing repeated COVID surges, resource shortages and public resistance to the vaccines that can keep people out of the hospital. Workers' distress is often called burnou...

    If you're a worker who plans to get pregnant, take heed of a new study that warns that pregnant women who work in hospitals and are exposed to disinfectants may be more likely to have children who suffer from asthma and

  • Cara Murez
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • Women whose jobs require shift work may experience delayed menopause, according to a new study, and it could be bad for their health.

    Whether it's working the overnight shift or different hours from day to day, shift work has been linked to higher risks for a variety of health problems, in...

    The more blazes firefighters battle, the higher their risk for a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (a-fib), a new study shows.

    "Clinicians who care for firefighters need to be aware of the increased cardiovascular risk, especially the increased ris...

    Construction workers may bring home more than the bacon -- they may also be exposing their families to toxic metals, a new study reveals.

    Toxic contaminants unintentionally brought from the workplace into the home are a public health hazard, but the majority of research to date has focused on

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  • February 22, 2022
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  • Most health care workers at a large U.S. hospital who initially refused COVID-19 vaccines eventually went and got their shots, new research reveals.

    "

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 4, 2022
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  • With America's best skiers, skaters and snowboarders now heading to the Winter Olympics, a team of mental health professionals will be in Beijing to help them perform under the double strain of intense competition and a pandemic.

    One of those professionals is Dr. David Baron, provost of Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, Calif. He'll enter the Olympic Village in Beijing as t...

    Workplace exposure to pesticides may boost a person's risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study finds.

    COPD is a group of lung diseases that cause airflow blockage and breathing problems. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are the two main types of

    U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

    Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the verge of critical staffing shortages, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA). In 12 states, 40% or more of ...

    Although they report difficulty breathing and discomfort while wearing a face mask, most people with asthma still use them in public places during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

    University of Illinois Chicago researchers conducted an online survey of more than 500 adults with asthma. They found that 84% report...

    Long-term workplace exposure to formaldehyde may prompt thinking and memory problems later in life, new research suggests.

    Formaldehyde is a gas used in making wood and chemical products and plastics.

    "We know that exposure to formaldehyde has been linked to certain cancers, and our results sugge...

    Of course kids make up the bulk of people at schools, but new evidence shows that requiring masks for adults working at schools greatly reduces the severity of COVID-19 outbreaks.

    In the study, the researchers found that children were most often the first identified cases in schools. However, outbreaks in schools were more severe when an adult was the first case, and mask wearing by adult...

    Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

    Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of vaccinated adults have already received a booster shot in the United States, up sharply from October when it was 10%.

    The pandemic is taking a toll on health care workers' sleep, which can put both their mental health and patient care at risk, researchers warn.

    Their study of more than 800 New York City health care workers found that compared to those with no sleep problems, those with poor sleep were two times more likely to report symptoms of depression, 70% more likely to report anxiety, and 50% more...