New Saturday Hours:
Bertha: 11:30am - 2pm
Clarissa: 9am - 11am
Henning: 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wadena: 9am - 12:00pm
Menahga: 1pm - 3pm
Park Rapids: 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Battle Lake: 9am - 1pm
New York Mills: 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Frazee: 3:45pm - 5:30pm

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Infections: Misc.".

27 Jun

Infections and Stroke Risk

Urinary tract infections may trigger ischemic stroke.

Health News Results - 289

Climate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report Warns

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children will face more food shortages and infections if climate change continues unchecked, researchers from the World Health Organization and 34 other institutions warn.

Climate change is already harming children's health. And they're at risk for lifelong health threats unless the world meets Paris Agreement targets to limit warming to wel...

Some Headway Made Against 'Superbugs,' but Threat Remains: CDC

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. response to the threat of antibiotic-resistant germs has shown some progress, but these potentially deadly bugs still show no signs of stopping, a new government report warns.

Prevention efforts have reduced deaths from antibiotic-resistant bugs by 18% overall and by nearly 30% in hospitals, the U.S. Centers for Disease Con...

Climate Change a 'Threat to Human Well-Being,' Scientists Say

TUESDAY, Nov. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A global coalition of more than 11,000 scientists warns that planet Earth is facing a "climate emergency" that will cause "untold human suffering" unless drastic steps are taken.

The warming climate is already taking a toll on human health, causing widespread hunger and illness that will grow exponentially worse, said the warning's lead author...

One Dead, 8 Hospitalized in Salmonella Outbreak Tied to Ground Beef

SATURDAY, Nov. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ground beef tainted with salmonella has led to 10 known infections across six states, including eight people so ill they had to be hospitalized, and one death.

"Illnesses in this outbreak are more severe than expected for salmonella," the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement issued Friday.

So far, infe...

Measles Leaves People More Vulnerable to Future Infections

THURSDAY, Oct. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who contract measles aren't out of the woods after their rash fades and their fever subsides.

They're then more vulnerable to other bacterial and viral infections -- even those they've already been vaccinated against or have had before.

That's because measles virus attacks the cells that serve as the immune system's memory,...

Tainted Fecal Transplant Killed One Patient -- More Vigilance Needed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal transplants can bring the promise of an improved microbiome in ill patients, but a new report suggests they are not risk-free.

In a fecal transplant, donated fecal matter is processed and put into capsules for patients to swallow. Once in the gut, the capsules dissolve, releasing new, healthy bacteria into the gut.

But doc...

Too Many Seniors Back in Hospital for Infections Treated During First Stay

TUESDAY, Oct. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of hospital readmissions for seniors with infections that were first treated during their initial hospital stay is too high, researchers report.

"We found that as many as 5% of patients leaving the hospital with an infection have a readmission for that pre-existing infection -- that's bad," said Geoffrey Hoffman, an assistant pro...

Bald Eagles Across U.S. Infected With Newly Identified Virus

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bald eagles in the United States are facing another challenge: Nearly one-third are infected with a newly identified virus, researchers say.

The virus is called bald eagle hepacivirus (BeHV). The researchers discovered it while trying to determine the cause of Wisconsin River Eagle Syndrome (WRES), a fatal disease seen in bald eagles in the L...

Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to...

Aging Population, Unhealthy Habits Underlie Expected Cancer Surge

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to population growth and aging, the number of cancer cases worldwide is expected to jump 60% by 2040 -- but unhealthy lifestyle habits are likely to make the surge even larger.

That's the conclusion from the new edition of the Cancer Atlas, unveiled Wednesday at the World Cancer Leaders' Summit in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. It n...

Only a Third of Pregnant Women Getting Vaccinations They Need

TUESDAY, Oct. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of pregnant women in the United States don't get vaccinated against both flu and whooping cough, putting them and their newborns at risk, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

"Influenza and pertussis (or whooping cough) are serious infections that can be deadly for babies, especially thos...

Germ Transplant Helps Women With Tough-to-Treat Vaginal Infections

MONDAY, Oct. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bacterial vaginosis is a common infection in women that's usually easily treated with antibiotics. But for those who develop recurrent infections, treatment options have been limited.

Now, Israeli researchers report they were able to put recurrent infections into remission in four out of five women who received a "vaginal microbiome transplant...

Sinus Infections:  What You Need to Know

SATURDAY, Oct. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Along with the flu, this is the time of year for sinus infections with their make-you-miserable stuffy, runny noses and blocked ears.

Most sinus infections are caused by viruses, but bacteria can also be to blame, according to Dr. Jessica Grayson, an assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

"...

Fungal Invasion May Drive Some Pancreatic Cancers

FRIDAY, Oct. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fungi living in the gut can move into the pancreas, triggering changes to normal cells that can result in cancer, a new study suggests.

The finding could advance the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer, which is usually fatal because it's often detected too late. The disease has been in the news lately because "Jeopardy!" host Alex T...

Organic Chicken Less Likely to Harbor a Dangerous 'Superbug'

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that suggests organic is best, a new study indicates that chickens raised without antibiotics may have fewer types of antibiotic-resistant salmonella than animals raised at factory farms.

Salmonella is a common infection among poultry, so some large farms feed their chickens antibiotics to prevent the birds from getting sick, an...

Could Vitamin C Infusions Save Patients With Sepsis?

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Massive vitamin C infusions could be a life-saver for patients with sepsis, an inflammatory condition run amok, new research suggests.

Sepsis is a leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals, claiming as many as 300,000 lives a year, according to the U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

"It's literally an explosion of th...

Only Thing Certain About Flu Season: You Need to Get Your Shot

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although no one knows yet how severe this flu season will be, now is the time to get vaccinated, health officials say.

Already this season, a 4-year-old from California who recently died tested positive for influenza, local health officials reported earlier this month. The child did have underlying health conditions, they added.

"...

Opioid Epidemic Tied to Doubling of Dangerous Heart Infections

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Addiction and overdose deaths aren't the only consequence of America's opioid epidemic. Cases of a potentially deadly heart infection have risen alarmingly, too, a new study finds.

This bacterial infection, called infective endocarditis, often affects young, poor white men who share needles. Many also have HIV, hepatitis C and alcohol abus...

Will Feeding Your Pets Raw Food Make You Sick?

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pet food-related infections in people are rare in households that feed their pets raw food, according to a large international survey.

There is ongoing controversy about whether feeding raw pet food such as uncooked meat, internal organs, bones and cartilage puts people at risk.

Researchers at the University of Helsinki in Finland ...

New Strain of Strep Causing Cases of Scarlet Fever

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new, more toxic strain of strep A bacteria is causing an outbreak of scarlet fever among British children, researchers report.

The upswing in scarlet fever is the biggest seen since the 1960s. Between 2014 and 2016, the number of cases went from 15,000 to more than 19,000. The infection tends to peak between March and May, the study found....

High Post-Hospital Death Rate Trails Ebola Survivors

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The overall death rate of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa may have been underestimated, with new research finding survivors could have a five times higher death rate after leaving the hospital than the general population.

An outbreak of Ebola is currently raging in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where more than 3,000 cases of the viral ...

Mumps Outbreaks Hitting U.S. Migrant Detention Centers

THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new government report finds more than 900 cases of dangerous and highly contagious mumps have occurred at 57 U.S. migrant detention facilities over the past year, with nearly half of cases occurring in Texas.

"Mumps is a highly contagious viral disease and can spread rapidly among people in close living quarters," said Dr. Robert Glatter, ...

Climate Change Hiking Danger of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Infections

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a horrible fate: You take a cool dip in the ocean and become infected with flesh-eating bacteria.

Climate change is making this terrifying scenario more common in the northern part of the United States, one infectious disease expert says.

These infections are caused by Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. There are about 80,000 s...

Texas Cities Are Ripe for Measles Outbreaks, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Texas cities are in danger of major measles outbreaks because an alarming number of school kids are unvaccinated, researchers warn.

Vaccination rates in the state have declined since 2003 and a computer simulation by University of Pittsburgh researchers found that an additional 5% decrease could increase the size of a measles outbreak b...

FDA Approves Drug for Most Deadly Form of TB

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug has been approved as part of a powerful, three-pronged treatment regimen for the most deadly strain of tuberculosis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

Pretomanid tablets were approved to be used with bedaquiline and linezolid in adults with extensive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) of the lungs....

Is a Chlamydia Vaccine on the Horizon?

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine against the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia appears safe and potentially effective, an early trial suggests.

The phase 1 study included 35 healthy women. Those who were given injections of two possible vaccines developed antibodies to the chlamydia bacteria, but a lot more testing is needed before the vaccine would be ready fo...

Health Threats Don't End for Some Sepsis Survivors

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that lands its victims in the hospital, but the dangers don't end for survivors who have high levels of inflammation long after being discharged, a new study finds.

"Sepsis is the leading cause of death among hospitalized patients. Patients discharged from the hospital aren't out of the woods yet. Approxim...

Dual Therapy Might Be Advance Against Genital Herpes, Animal Study Suggests

THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's only been tried so far in guinea pigs, but researchers say a combination of a vaccine and a medicated cream could greatly lower recurrence of genital herpes.

The condition is very common, affecting about one out of six Americans between the ages of 14 and 49, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There's curre...

Where Is Your Risk of Dying Greatest After Surgery?

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have noncardiac surgery are much more likely to die after they leave the hospital than in the operating room, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 40,000 adults, age 45 and older, who were operated on at 28 centers in 14 countries in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia.

Of tho...

Traveling Abroad? Make Sure Your Measles Shot Is Up to Date

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to waning vaccination levels in some areas, measles outbreaks are back with a vengeance.

But many globe-trotting Americans may not realize the problem is worldwide. Therefore, making sure your measles vaccination is up to date is paramount before jetting off.

In fact, U.S. outbreaks of measles "are usually started by foreign t...

WHO Declares Congo Ebola Outbreak a 'Global Health Emergency'

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The World Health Organization (WHO) on Wednesday called the year-old outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo a global health emergency, The New York Times reported.

The declaration, made by a panel of experts, follows news this week that the deadly infectious disease had spread to Goma, the largest city in eastern Congo...

Chinese Scientists Cut Local Numbers of Dangerous Mosquito by 94%

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Some mosquitoes spread diseases to humans through their bite, passing along harmful pathogens like Zika, dengue fever, West Nile virus and chikungunya.

Now humans are turning the tables, infecting these dangerous mosquitoes with bacteria that sabotage their ability to spawn.

Chinese researchers were able to reduce these mosquito p...

Disinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital Germ

TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Standard decontamination methods may not be enough to stop a dangerous hospital bug, known as Clostridium difficile.

In a new study, researchers followed recommended procedures but found that surgical gowns, stainless steel surfaces and vinyl floors in hospitals were still contaminated with the C. difficile bacteria.

"...

Many Pneumonia Patients Get Too Many Antibiotics

FRIDAY, July 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of hospitalized pneumonia patients may be prescribed antibiotics for too long, increasing their risk for potentially harmful side effects, researchers say.

In 93#37; of cases, overprescription involved the number of antibiotics patients received upon being discharged from the hospital.

Each year in the United States, pneum...

Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before Birth

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research shows that neurological damage for babies who were exposed to the Zika virus while in the womb continues to unfold years after birth.

Developmental problems were found in one-third of the 216 children studied, some of whom were 3 years old. The problems affected language, thinking and motor skills development. Some also had eye a...

Dangerous UTIs Can Follow Hospital Patients Home

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For the sick or elderly, a urinary tract infection (UTI) can prove deadly. With many vulnerable patients developing UTIs post-discharge, a new study suggests that better monitoring is needed after leaving the hospital.

Researchers at Oregon State University explored more than 3,000 at-risk patients. The study revealed that the risk of infectio...

Reacting Against a 'Too Clean' World, Some Parents Go Too Far the Other Way

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Somewhere between the Mom who obsessively wipes down every knob and toy her child might touch, and the Dad who thinks rolling in the dirt is "good" for kids, there's a healthy medium, British experts say.

"We have to find a way to protect against infectious diseases and harmful microbes, whilst at the same time sustaining exposure to the ess...

Infections, Especially UTIs, May Be Triggers for Strokes

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A urinary tract infection might be more than just a painful nuisance for some, with new research suggesting it could raise the risk of stroke in vulnerable people.

The study of over 190,000 stroke patients found that the risk of suffering a stroke was heightened in the weeks and months following any infection that required a trip to the hosp...

FDA Approves First Drug for Sinusitis With Nasal Polyps

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what specialists say could be a turning point in care, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first drug to treat chronic sinusitis that involves the growth of polyps within the sinuses.

Dupixent (dupilumab) is given by injection every two weeks. It was approved to treat patients with nasal polyps and chronic rhin...

Med Students' Smartphones Loaded With Staph, Other Germs

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphones have become an essential part of modern medicine, but they might be exposing patients to potentially deadly staph infections, a new study suggests.

Tests of cellphones at a Brazilian medical school revealed that 40% carried Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause of hospital infections.

Worse, 85% of the bact...

Ocean Swimming Causes Skin Changes: Study

SATURDAY, June 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The population of bacteria on your skin changes when you swim in the ocean, potentially increasing your risk of infection, researchers report.

They collected samples of skin bacteria from the legs of nine people before they took a 10-minute swim in the ocean, after they had air-dried completely following their swim, and then six and 24 hours...

Flying Insects in Hospitals Carry 'Superbug' Germs

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many flies and flying insects in hospitals carry bacteria that could pose an infection risk to patients, and more than half of them carry the types that resist antibiotics, a new study says.

British researchers used ultraviolet-light flytraps, electronic fly killers and sticky traps to collect nearly 20,000 flies, aphids, ants, wasps, bees and...

Norovirus Fears Stir Recall of Frozen Blackberries

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You may want to check any frozen blackberries or mixed berries you bought recently: A Georgia-based distributor is recalling products sold at Walmart and Save-A-Lot stores due to potential contamination with norovirus.

In a company statement, Alma Pak of Alma, Ga., stressed that so far there have been no illnesses linked to the bags of frozen ...

U.S. Cases of Infant Gut Illness Plummet After Vaccine Introduced

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In the midst of the "anti-vaxxer" movement comes more scientific proof that vaccines help save children's lives.

Researchers report that since the 2006 introduction of a vaccine against rotavirus -- a common and potentially fatal cause of infant diarrhea -- U.S. cases have fallen dramatically.

What's more, the rotavirus "season" is now...

Many Health Care Workers With Flu, Colds Still Go to Work: Study

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care workers are still on the job even if they have symptoms of a cold, flu or other respiratory infection, putting patients and coworkers at risk, a new study finds.

It included more than 2,700 health care workers at nine Canadian hospitals who completed online diaries whenever they had symptoms of a respiratory infection.

...

Frozen Avocado Recalled Due to Potential Listeria Threat

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although no illnesses have yet been reported, the makers of Signature Select Avocado Chunks are issuing a product recall due to possible contamination with the listeria germ.

In a statement issued Tuesday, Nature's Touch Frozen Foods said the recall is "based on strict precautionary measures after the company was informed by the [U.S. Food ...

Sprouts Supermarkets Recalls Frozen Spinach Due to Listeria Fears

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although illnesses have not yet been reported, the Sprouts Farmers Market chain says it is recalling frozen spinach sold nationwide, due to potential contamination with the listeria germ.

The recall involves Frozen Cut Leaf Spinach, in both conventional and organic 16-ounce bags, made by National Frozen Foods of Oregon. Sprouts announced the ...

Another Climate Change Threat: More 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria?

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A flesh-eating bacteria has migrated into the Delaware Bay between Delaware and New Jersey, drawn north by the warmer waters of climate change, doctors say.

Five cases of infection with Vibrio vulnificus occurred in 2017 and 2018 along the Delaware Bay, compared to one infection with the devastating bacteria in the eight years prior, r...

Heading to Europe This Summer? Get Your Measles Shot

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Europe deals with its biggest measles outbreaks since the 1990s, U.S. health officials are urging travelers to be up-to-date on vaccination.

In 2018, European countries reported more than 83,500 measles cases, including 74 deaths, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). A majority of cases were in the Ukraine, but Serbia, France, ...

FDA Warns of Infections From Fecal Transplants After 1 Death

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal transplants -- transferring fecal matter from a healthy person into an ill person with a compromised "microbiome" -- is an increasingly used new treatment for a variety of ills.

But on Thursday federal health officials announced that a patient died after such a procedure, highlighting the potential for severe infections linked to fecal t...

Show All Health News Results