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Another Study Finds COVID Usually Mild in Kids

COVID-19 is mild is most children, a new study says, but certain children have a higher risk of severe illness.

Of more than 135,000 children tested for the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) at seven children's hospitals in the United States up to September, 4% were found to be infected.

Those most likely to test positive included children from ethnic minorities, teens, those with histor...

Does Parents' Nagging Kids About Screen Time Even Matter?

Parents' constant refrain, telling their teens to turn off the TV, stop playing video games or put down the cellphone, may not be necessary.

And new research suggests those worried about their kids becoming addicted to technology may even be able to breathe a sigh of relief.

The amount of time young people spend on technology -- and parental limits on that time -- had no lasting eff...

Parents' Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against COVID, Study Finds

As scientists worked on COVID-19 vaccines, other researchers were addressing a question: Once shots are available, will parents vaccinate their kids against the new coronavirus?

The answer: Younger parents are much less likely than older ones to plan to vaccinate their children and themselves against COVID-19.

"Parents' willingness to vaccinate themselves and their children against ...

B 11/21 -- Which Kids With COVID Will Get Very Sick?

Scientists have identified symptoms that may predict the severity of COVID-19 in children.

According to the researchers, children with respiratory disease and those with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (a rare but serious condition linked with COVID-19) have the most severe illness.

"Much of the discussion to date around COVID-19 suggests that children don't typically suffer seri...

Add Kids to COVID Vaccine Trials, Pediatricians' Group Says

Children should be included in COVID-19 vaccine trials at the earliest possible stage, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians says.

If that's not done, youngsters' lives could be at risk, according to the 67,000-member American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

"If we do not add children to these research trials very soon, there will be a significant delay in when children are able to ac...

Thin Ice: Global Warming May Be Raising Drowning Risks

More children and young adults are drowning in winter lakes because of warming temperatures that create unstable lake ice, a new study finds.

A team of international researchers examined several decades of data, including 4,000 drownings and population information from throughout Canada, 14 U.S. states, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Finland, Russia, Sweden and regions of Italy and Japan. They...

Is the Pandemic Harming Kids' Mental Health?

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2020 (HealthDay) -- Since last April, hospital emergency rooms across the United States have seen a sustained surge in visits related to the mental health of school-aged kids, a new report reveals.

The findings suggest the COVID-19 pandemic is taking a toll on children because of disruptions to their everyday life, anxiety about illness and social isolation. That conclusi...

Telemedicine Is Keeping Kids' Asthma Care on Track: Study

The use of telemedicine led to an increase in the number of inner-city kids in Los Angeles who kept asthma-related doctor appointments during the coronavirus pandemic, new research shows.

The researchers examined "show rates" -- how often parents kept an appointment for their children instead of not showing up -- over the first four months of the pandemic.

Allergists who run a schoo...

Eczema More Common Among Black, Hispanic Kids

Black and Hispanic children in the United States have much higher rates of the skin condition eczema than white children, experts say.

These disparities in eczema -- also called atopic dermatitis (AD) -- will be presented at a virtual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), Friday through Sunday.

"Not only do Black children in the U.S. have signif...

Pre-Op 'Brain Games' Might Prevent Post-Op Delirium

Playing brain games before surgery may reduce your risk of delirium after your operation, a new study says.

Just as you can prepare your body for surgery, you can do the same for your brain by keeping it active and challenged through something called "neurobics," according to Ohio State University researchers.

Delirium -- a post-surgery complication especially common in older patien...

Are Healthy Kids Getting Too Many Heart Tests?

Not every kid needs an electrocardiogram (ECG) before playing sports or as part of routine exams, child health experts say.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is advising parents and pediatricians to avoid unnecessary tests, and has released a list of common medical practices and therapies that may not be needed for young patients.

The AAP and the Choosing Wisely campaign al...

Big Spike Seen in COVID Cases Among Kids

COVID-19 is surging among America's children, according to leading medical groups.

As of Oct. 29, more than 853,000 children in the United States had tested positive for the virus since the pandemic began — 200,000 of them in October alone. In the week ending Oct. 29, an estimated 61,000 new cases in kids were reported — the most of any week in the pandemic, the American Academy of P...

AHA News: How Could It Be a Stroke, Mom Asked 'She's Only 8'

Jill Veach looked at the name on her chirping phone.

The caller was her longtime babysitter. It was midafternoon, around the time Jill's husband, Matt, would have picked up their children -- Claudia, 8, and Vinnie, 4 -- from the babysitter's home. Matt must have left something there, Jill thought before answering.

"Jill, I'm not trying to scare you, but Claudia is crying with a real...

Lockdowns Can Widen Kids' Waistlines – Here's How to Curb That

Stuck at home, bored. Fiddling with their phone or playing video games. Munching on snack foods to while away the time.

School-age children gaining excess pounds could be one lasting health problem caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, with pediatricians and public health experts warning about a potentially dramatic increase in childhood obesity.

"I think it is possible, and pote...

Social Media 'Kid Influencers' Are Promoting Junk Foods

Is your kid suddenly clamoring for a fast food meal or a sugary cereal you've never even heard of? He or she may have seen the product featured on a favorite "kid influencer" video.

In a new study, researchers viewed the top 50 kid influencer videos on YouTube and found that 9 out of 10 featured unhealthy foods. Nearly 1 in 3 promoted a fast-food chain.

But, what in the world is...

Repeal of Obamacare Could Leave Young Cancer Patients in the Lurch

If Obamacare, or the Affordable Care Act (ACA), is repealed, pediatric cancer patients could lose critical insurance coverage, a new study warns.

Kids with cancer often require intensive treatment and long-term follow-up to beat the disease. The ACA allows them to stay on their parents' insurance coverage to age 26 and bans exclusion of patients with preexisting conditions.

...

Bringing the Forest to Kids' Daycare May Boost Young Immune Systems

Want to give your kids an immune system boost? Try letting them play in the dirt more often, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Finland found that when they brought nature into daycare playgrounds -- including forest soil and vegetation -- preschoolers' immune function showed a change for the better. In simple terms, it shifted to a less inflammatory state.

That immune sys...

Losing Some TV Ads Might Reduce Childhood Obesity

Limiting TV ads for sugary, salty and high-fat foods and drinks might help reduce childhood obesity, British researchers suggest.

They looked at advertising of these products between 5:30 a.m. and 9 p.m. If all such ads were withdrawn during those hours, the number of obese kids in the U.K. between the ages of 5 and 17 would drop by 5% and the number of overweight kids would fall...

Your Guide to a Safe and Happy Halloween

The truly scary thing about Halloween this year is that it's occurring during a pandemic, but there are safe ways to celebrate, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says.

Suggestions include: virtual costume parties; physically distant, outdoor costume parades; Halloween-themed craft making; movie nights at home; decorating pumpkins; and making favorite treats.

"Many kid...

Kids' Hospitalizations Accompany Rising Unemployment Rates: Study

COVID-19 has led to widespread job loss in the United States. And now a new study reports that when unemployment rates rise, so do hospitalizations of children.

For the study, researchers analyzed 12 years of data (2002 to 2014) from 14 states. They found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there was a 2% increase in child hospitalizations for all causes, among them d...

Music Classes Strike a Chord in Kids' Brain Development: Study

Learning to play a musical instrument helps fine-tune kids' brains, researchers say.

In a new study, 40 children (aged 10 to 13) performed memory and attention tasks while their brain activity was monitored with functional MRI. This type of imaging scan detects small changes in blood flow within the brain.

Twenty of the children played an instrument, had completed at least t...

Pediatricians' Group Tackles Racism in Health Care

As the struggle against racism continues to simmer across the United States, the American Academy of Pediatrics took a hard look at racial gaps in health care for children during its recent annual meeting.

"We know racism is a social determinant of health, and it's a public health issue, so we spent a great deal of time focusing on that," Dr. Elizabeth Murray, a pediatrician with the ...

Do Minority Kids Face More Danger During Surgeries?

Black children are more than twice as likely as white kids to die from surgical complications, and minority children are about half as likely to even have surgery as white children, two new studies show.

In one study, researchers found that of nearly 277,000 children who had inpatient surgery between 2012 and 2017, 10,425 suffered a complication that required follow-up surgery and 209...

1 in 3 U.S. Parents Won't Get Flu Shots for Their Kids: Survey

The coronavirus pandemic and the upcoming flu season could pose a double threat, but many U.S. parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids, a new survey finds.

Though public health experts stress the need for people of all ages to get the seasonal flu vaccine during the COVID-19 pandemic, 1 in 3 U.S. parents said they don't plan on taking their child for a flu shot this fall. Just a...

For Kids With Hearing Issues, Early Intervention Crucial to School Readiness

When babies with hearing impairments get help very early in life, they are more likely to be "kindergarten-ready" when the time comes, a new study finds.

In the United States, all states have government-funded "early intervention" programs designed to assist parents whose babies are deaf or hard of hearing. Ideally, that intervention starts soon after hearing issues are diagnosed, as ...

Kids Much Less Prone to Coronavirus Infection Than Adults: Study

Combined data from 32 studies from around the world suggest that children under the age of 10 are much less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared with adults, given the same daily contacts.

Children's risk appears to rise with age: Among adolescent and older teenagers, the risk of infection begins to approach that of adults, according to British researchers led by Russel...

Immune System Clues to Why COVID Is Easier on Kids

Kids and adults have different immune system responses to infection with the new coronavirus, which may help explain why severe COVID-19 is more common in adults, researchers report.

For their new study, they examined blood and cell samples from patients admitted with COVID-19 symptoms to the Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.

The researchers found that the younger ...

After COVID-19 Exposure, When Can Young Athletes Resume Play?

Young athletes who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms should be symptom-free for 14 days and get their doctor's OK before returning to practices or games, according to a leading group of U.S. pediatricians.

An electrocardiogram (EKG) is also recommended for those who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in updated guidance.

"Exercis...

Kids Often Hit Hard by Death of Beloved Pet, Study Finds

The loss of a pet may be a child's first encounter with death, and new research suggests no one should underestimate the psychological trauma that the loss can bring.

Previous studies have found that kids form deep emotional attachments to their pets and having a furry companion in your youth has been linked to greater empathy, self-esteem and social skills.

"The effects of...

Holidays Can Be a Fright for Kids With Food Allergies

Parents of kids with food allergies probably won't be surprised to hear that Halloween is an especially risky time for their youngsters.

A new study found that serious allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) triggered by peanuts jumped 85% when kids were trick or treating. Serious reactions triggered by an unknown tree nut or peanut exposure rose by 70% on Halloween compared to the ...

Black Kids at Higher Odds for ADHD

Current wisdom holds that white kids are at greater risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than Black children are, but a new analysis finds the opposite is true.

In a review of 21 previously published U.S. studies, which included nearly 155,000 Black children in the United States, researchers found that 14.5% of these children had ADHD. That's much higher than t...

Death From COVID-19 Very Rare for Americans 21 and Under: Report

Only a tiny fraction of children and young adults who have contracted COVID-19 have died from their infection, a new government report shows.

Just 121 people younger than 21 have died from COVID-19 through the end of July, out of nearly 392,000 confirmed or probable cases, said researchers led by Dr. Danae Bixler from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The ...

More Than 1 in 3 U.S. Pediatricians Dismiss Vaccine-Refusing Families

Parents who choose to forgo or delay their children's vaccinations may quickly find themselves without a pediatrician.

Just over half (51%) of pediatric offices in the United States have a policy to dismiss families that refuse childhood vaccines, a nationwide survey found. Thirty-seven percent of pediatricians themselves said they often dismissed families for refusing vaccines, ...

Probiotic Might Help Ease Children's Eczema

Applying a type of "good" bacteria to the skin may relieve children of the itch and discomfort of eczema, a new, small study suggests.

Eczema is a chronic inflammatory condition that causes dry, itchy skin and scaly rashes. It usually starts in early childhood, and commonly occurs along with allergies like hay fever and asthma, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and ...

Are School Lunches a Ticket to Healthy Eating?

Healthier school meals improve the diets of American children, a new study finds.

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act took effect in 2012 and required school meals to include more whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and less sodium.

To assess how the act affected students' diets, researchers analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2016, wh...

Fewer Kids May Be Carrying Coronavirus Without Symptoms Than Believed: Study

Are infected-but-healthy children major "silent spreaders" of the new coronavirus? New research out of northern Italy, once a COVID-19 hotspot, suggests they might not be.

Rigorous COVID-19 testing of children and adults admitted to a hospital in Milan for reasons other than coronavirus found that just over 1% of kids tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, compared to more than 9% o...

Electrical Brain Stimulation Offers Hope Against Dyslexia

Electrical stimulation of a sound-processing area of the brain can briefly improve reading skills in adults with dyslexia, a new, small study has found.

Researchers say their results suggest that deficits in that brain region are a cause of the reading difficulties seen in dyslexia.

But whether that's the case -- or whether brain stimulation can help treat dyslexia -- remain...

Children Use Both Sides of the Brain to Understand Language

Adults process language on one side of the brain, but kids use both hemispheres, a new study suggests.

The finding might explain why children recover more easily from brain injuries than adults, the study authors added.

"This is very good news for young children who experience a neural injury," said researcher Elissa Newport. She's a neurology professor at Georgetown Univer...

Over Half a Million U.S. Kids Already Infected With COVID-19

More than 500,000 U.S. children had been diagnosed with COVID-19 as of early September, with a sizable uptick seen in recent weeks, a new report reveals.

There were 70,630 new child cases reported between Aug. 20 and Sept. 3, 2020. That brings the total to 513,415 cases -- a 16% increase over two weeks, according to state-by-state data compiled by the American Academy of Pediatric...

First Trial of Gene-Targeted Asthma Rx in Kids Shows Promise

Asthma treatments tailored to the genes of kids and teens could help improve control of their symptoms, new research suggests.

The study included 241 adolescents, aged 12 to 18, who were randomly selected to receive either traditional asthma treatment or "personalized medicine" -- treatment based on their individual genetics.

During a year of follow-up, those in the personal...

Kids Can Have Coronavirus And Antibodies at Same Time: Study

The new coronavirus and antibodies that fight it can be in children's bodies at the same time, surprised researchers have found.

"With most viruses, when you start to detect antibodies, you won't detect the virus anymore. But with COVID-19, we're seeing both," said Dr. Burak Bahar, director of laboratory informatics at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C.

"This m...

Does TV And Computer Time Affect Kids' Math, Reading?

Children who spend too much time on computers or watching TV may have poorer reading and math skills, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed school test data of more than 1,200 Australian children when they were 8 and 9 years of age and again two years later. Parents were asked about their child's use of electronic media.

Kids who watched two or more hours of TV a day at ag...

Kids, Teens Usually Have Mild COVID-19 Infections, Rarely Fatal Ones: Study

Severe COVID-19 is rare in kids and teens, and death is exceptionally rare, occurring only in those with serious underlying conditions, according to a new study.

The study, published Aug. 27 in the BMJ, also showed that Black children have a disproportionately high rate of severe COVID-19 illness.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from 651 children and teen...

Time Spent in Nature Boosts Kids' Well-Being

Whether camping, hiking or gardening, connecting with nature has many benefits for children's well-being, a new study suggests.

"There is strong evidence that children are happier, healthier, function better, know more about the environment, and are more likely to take action to protect the natural world when they spend time in nature," said researcher Dr. Louise Chawla, professor em...

Sweet-Tooth Tendencies Change as Kids Get Older: Study

Young people seldom say a food or drink is "too sweet." A new study suggests that may be because they're less sensitive to sugar than adults and prefer more of it.

Researchers found that compared to adults, kids and teens needed 40% more sugar in a solution to detect sweetness.

The researchers also found that young people have a bigger "sweet tooth" than adults, or prefe...

A Guide to Managing Children's Diabetes During COVID-19

Parents worry that COVID-19 can make a diabetic child's condition worse, but an expert has some tips for keeping kids healthy during the pandemic.

"If a child has good control of their diabetes, it does not seem as though there will be severe effects if they were to get the virus," said Dr. Michael Yafi, an associate professor of pediatric endocrinology at McGovern Medical School at ...

Artificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes in Kids 6 and Up, Clinical Trial Shows

An artificial pancreas system is safe and effective at managing blood sugar levels in kids as young as age 6 with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study.

The system uses a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to track blood sugar levels and automatically delivers insulin when needed using an insulin pump. It replaces reliance on fingerstick or CGM with delivery of insulin by injection ...

Pandemic Learning Can Strain Children's Eyes

If your child will be doing online learning this school year, you need to take steps to protect them from eye strain, the American Academy of Ophthalmology says.

"I really have seen a marked increase in kids suffering from eye strain because of increased screen time. Good news is most symptoms can be avoided by taking a few simple steps," pediatric ophthalmologist Dr. Stephen Lipsky, ...

Obesity in Youth Could Be Big Risk Factor for MS

High rates of child and teen obesity could play a growing role in people's risk for multiple sclerosis (MS), British researchers say.

Prior research has suggested that 53% of MS risk is directly attributable to environmental factors. For example, up to 1 in 5 cases could be attributed to smoking, the research team noted.

Increasingly, obesity is also a big risk factor fo...

Don't Count on Vitamin D to Ease Childhood Asthma

Vitamin D supplements don't prevent severe asthma attacks in at-risk children, according to a study that challenges previous research.

"The reason that's important is there are colleagues around this country and worldwide who are testing vitamin D levels for kids with asthma and giving them vitamin D," said study lead author Dr. Juan Celedón. He's chief of pediatric pulmonary m...

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