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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 550

Trauma of Miscarriage May Trigger PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) isn't confined to soldiers on the battlefield; it can happen to anyone after a traumatic event -- including pregnancy loss.

After a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, 1 in 6 women can have PTSD nearly a year later, European researchers report.

"Early pregnancy loss is associated with a significant level of psychological distress, and in...

Why Tidying Up Is Sometimes Harder Than Expected

If you can't quite bring yourself to declutter your home and toss out unneeded possessions, one reason why might surprise you.

Researchers say the emotional tug you feel might be loneliness.

"When consumers make decisions about how to get rid of multiple possessions, perhaps when they are moving, it is a time when they are likely to feel lonely," said Catherine Cole. She's a...

1 in 4 Children With Autism Is Undiagnosed: Study

Far too many U.S. children with autism are waiting too long for a diagnosis, new research shows, and those delays can greatly affect their quality of life.

About one in every four 8-year-olds assessed in the new study was found to have undiagnosed autism and wasn't receiving autism services. Most of those kids were black or Hispanic, according to the report published online recently i...

'Burnout' Could Raise Your Odds for A-fib

Feeling exhausted, with too few hours in the day to do what needs to be done?

Be careful of burnout -- especially after a new study finds it can raise your risk for the dangerous irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.

"A-fib" -- long tied to higher odds for heart attack and stroke -- is the most common form of heart arrhythmia. It's estimated that 10 million peopl...

Good News for People with Persistent Anxiety

A diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder need not be a life sentence, a large Canadian study suggests.

"It's so exciting," said lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson, director of the Institute for Life Course and Aging at the University of Toronto.

People with generalized anxiety disorder worry excessively for long periods, and most days they struggle to control their discomfort, ...

Can Pot Bring on Psychosis in Young Users? It May Be Happening, Experts Say

The idea of marijuana causing a psychotic breakdown sounds like something out of the camp film classic "Reefer Madness," but many experts argue it's not that far-fetched.

As legalization of recreational marijuana spreads across the United States, more people are showing up in ERs with psychotic symptoms after consuming too much pot, said Dr. Itai Danovitch, chairman of psychiatry and ...

Hong Kong Unrest Leaves Millions to Struggle With PTSD, Depression

As mass protests have swept across Hong Kong in recent months, a mounting mental health toll will be tough to tackle, new research suggests.

Surveys conducted over 10 years show there was a sixfold increase in the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among Hong Kong residents from shortly after Occupy Central in March 2015 (about 5%) to Sept./Nov. 2019 (ne...

Veterans' Study Shows Genetic Origins of Anxiety

New research involving the DNA of 200,000 U.S. veterans suggests that there really is such a thing as a "worry gene."

Researchers have identified six genetic variants linked to anxiety -- a discovery that may help explain why anxiety and depression often go hand in hand.

"This is the richest set of results for the genetic basis of anxiety to date," said study co-lead author...

Family's Social Standing May Be Key to Happiness for Teens

How teens see their family's social status may play a part in their mental health and success at school, a new study suggests.

Social status appears to be more important than what their parents do for a living, how much money they have or how educated they are, the researchers said.

"The amount of financial resources children have access to is one of the most reliable pred...

Alcohol-Fueled Deaths Double in U.S. Over Past 20 Years

The number of Americans dying from alcohol abuse each year has doubled since 1999, a new study reveals.

Between 1999 and 2017, alcohol-related deaths jumped from nearly 36,000 a year to almost 73,000. That's about 1 million deaths lost to booze over less than two decades, with white women experiencing the greatest annual increases.

"Those deaths are associated with despair...

Music Does Give Your Workout a Boost

Gymgoers who've accidentally left their headphones at home might be all too familiar with this frustrating feeling: Exercising without music is a much harder go.

And now a broad new review of nearly 140 studies -- the first of its kind -- suggests there's real science to back that up, with clear evidence that music not only makes exercise seem easier and more enjoyable but actually re...

As Minimum Wage Rises, Suicide Rates Fall

Minimum wage laws can be a literal lifesaver for people who are struggling to get by, a new study suggests.

The suicide rate declines among less-educated folks when the minimum wage is increased, researchers discovered.

States experience as much as a 6% decrease in their suicide rates for every $1 increase in the minimum wage, said lead researcher John Kaufman, a doctora...

Victoria's Secret Models Are Skinnier Now, as Average Woman's Waistline Widens

For the average American woman, it's now tougher than ever before to match the "ideal" beauty set by supermodels, new research shows.

Even as the average dress size for a U.S. woman rises, the measurements of the average Victoria's Secret model have shrunk, according to researchers at Boston University School of Medicine.

For the study, the researchers tracked the measuremen...

Health Care Is Top Concern for U.S. Veterans

After discharge, military veterans are most concerned about their physical and mental health, a new study finds.

Although most vets are satisfied with their work and social relationships, they are less happy with their health care. Most are coping with chronic physical or mental health conditions, researchers found.

"What remains to be seen is whether those veterans with h...

New Year's Resolutions Didn't Stick? Try a Monday Reset

You made your resolution -- this year was finally going to be the year you lost weight. But then your neighbor stopped by with a plate of cookies, and well, your resolve didn't even last a day. Maybe next year?

But instead of looking at your resolutions as a sweeping year-long project, what if you concentrated on making healthy changes every Monday? That way, if you slip up and dive ...

Writing Out Your Worries Really Works Wonders

As much as people often love to talk about their feelings, it might be more productive to skip the conversations and write about your worries instead, according to research done at Michigan State University (MSU).

The research, published in the journal Psychophysiology, provides the first neural evidence of the benefits of expressive writing, according to lead author Hans Schro...

Expectations for New Star Wars Movie Could Sway Your Viewing Pleasure

Millions of Americans have filled movie theaters over the holidays to watch the latest in the Star Wars saga, but a new study suggests that enjoyment of the film may be governed by prior expectations.

To see how expectations affect viewing pleasure, researchers surveyed 441 people before and after they saw "Star Wars: Episode VIII -- The Last Jedi" in 2017.

Based on the resu...

Tips to Keep New Year's Resolutions

Lose weight. Eat healthier. Quit smoking. These are all popular New Year's resolutions that are often only kept for a short time, if at all.

About 40% of Americans make a New Year's resolution, most of which are abandoned by February, according to researchers at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

But Bernadette Melnyk, vice president for health promotion and c...

Yoga May Bring a Brain Boost, Review Shows

Looking for a way to improve your memory, gain control over your emotions, and boost your ability to multitask?

A new brain scan study may be just the incentive you need to put yoga at the top of your New Years' to-do list.

The review of 11 published studies found a link between yoga's movements, meditation and breathing practices and an increase in the size of key brain are...

Heavy Drinking Plus Xanax, Valium: A Dangerous Mix

People who regularly drink to excess are also likely to use benzodiazepines, a new study finds.

These drugs -- like Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), Klonopin (clonazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), and Restoril (temazepam) -- are used to treat depression and anxiety.

But when heavy drinkers use them, benzodiazepines (sometimes referred to as "benzos") may increase the risk...

Is Green the Feel-Good Color of the Holidays?

There's one type of green Christmas that's likely to bring joy to gift-givers and recipients alike, a new Canadian study suggests.

That's one based on green consumerism -- a push to buy gifts produced in ways that protect the natural environment.

For this study, researchers at Concordia University in Montreal asked volunteers how a number of green and not-green products mad...

'Shopping Addiction' Can Cause Harm, and It's Moved Online

The holidays are peak buying time, and perhaps the worst time of the year for people who simply can't control their urge to shop.

Now, research shows that the ease of online purchasing could be making things worse for people with so-called "buying-shopping disorder" (BSD).

BSD is still debated as a stand-alone diagnosis, and hasn't yet been included in the psychologists' bib...

Love Museums, Theater? The Arts Might Extend Your Life

If you're a senior who loves to take in the latest art exhibit or check out a new musical, it might do more than stimulate your senses: New research suggests it could lengthen your life.

Scientists found that among over 6,700 older adults they tracked, patrons of the arts had a markedly better survival rate over the next 14 years.

People who, at the outset, devoted time to c...

Caring for Grandkids Might Help Stave Off Loneliness

Caring for a grandchild might be the best way to fight the isolation of old age, new research suggests.

This conclusion is based on 2014 data collected as part of an ongoing German survey of older adults.

Among the nearly 3,900 grandparents in the survey, more than 1,100 said they cared for a grandchild. Those who had grandchildren to care for had lower scores on loneliness...

People With Depression Are Turning to Pot for Relief: Study

People suffering from depression are often desperate for anything to break them out of their debilitating mood disorder.

But in their misery, many might be turning to a risky solution that's likely to make their condition even worse -- marijuana.

People with depression are twice as likely to be using pot as those who aren't depressed, researchers reported in the current issu...

ADHD in Childhood May Mean Financial Struggles Later

Children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to lag behind their peers long after they leave school, earning less as adults and living with their parents longer, a new study finds.

This is often true even if the hallmark symptoms of the disorder -- including inability to focus, hyperactivity, fidgetiness and impulsivity -- appear to have abated.

...

Chyler Leigh of 'Supergirl' Battles Bipolar Disorder

Chyler Leigh has taken on some challenging roles in her career, including helping keep the world safe from alien threats on the TV show "Supergirl" and learning to be a surgeon as Lexie Grey on "Grey's Anatomy." But her most demanding task has been learning to manage bipolar disorder.

"I wasn't diagnosed until my late 20s, but I knew at a pretty early age that something wasn't quite ...

Bullying's 'Vicious Circle' Harms Mental Health

Bullied teens are more likely to develop mental health problems, and people with mental health problems are also more likely to become bullies, researchers report.

Even though many studies have shown that being bullied can leave mental scars, "no studies to date" have tested the notion that mental health issues might also help drive bullying, explained study author Marine Azevedo Da ...

Have a Purpose, Have a Healthier Life

Do you feel like you know why you're here?

The answer to that question could determine how you feel day-to-day.

If you've found meaning in your life, you're more likely to be both physically and mentally healthy, a new study reports.

On the other hand, people restlessly searching for meaning in their life are more likely to have worse mental well-being, with their ...

An 'Epidemic of Loneliness' in America?  Maybe Not

Despite media stories about a "loneliness epidemic" plaguing the elderly, two new studies find that they feel no more lonely than their peers from past generations.

The studies -- one in the United States, one in the Netherlands -- reached the same basic conclusion: Yes, people tend to feel more lonely after age 75 or so. But today's older adults are no more likely to feel isolated or...

Who's More Apt to Be a Narcissist -- the Young or the Old?

Know any folks who are just too full of themselves? Rest assured: They'll probably get over it eventually.

That's because narcissism tends to decline with age, according to what researchers described as the longest study ever of the personality disorder.

For the study, a Michigan State University team looked at nearly 750 people to assess how narcissism changed between ages...

One-Third of Lung Cancer Patients Battle Depression: Study

Depression is common among lung cancer patients and can damage their quality of life and treatment outcomes, a new study indicates.

The findings suggest that doctors should screen lung cancer patients for depression and refer them for mental health care if necessary, said lead author Barbara Andersen, a professor of psychology at Ohio State University in Columbus.

"Depressio...

Another Downside to Vaping: Higher Odds for Depression

Vaping, already linked to lung damage, may also have harmful psychological effects, a new study suggests.

The researchers found a strong association between vaping and depression in a study of nearly 900,000 U.S. adults.

The apparent culprit: nicotine.

"There is a potential risk between e-cigarette use and depression," said lead researcher Dr. Olufunmilayo Obises...

Deportation Fears Linked to Migrant Women's High Blood Pressure: Study

Fear of deportation doubles the risk of high blood pressure in Mexican-born women in farmworker families who live in California's Salinas Valley, a new study claims.

It included 572 women, average age 39, who in 2012-2014 were asked to rate their level of worry about deportation for themselves or others as low (28%); moderate (24%); or high (48%).

Researchers lin...

Life Expectancy Shrinks for America's Working-Age Adults

Despair, as evidenced in rising rates of drug abuse and suicide, may be eroding the average life expectancy of Americans, a new study finds.

Deaths among working-age adults, especially, have been increasing in the United States for decades, particularly in economically struggling parts of the nation such as the "Rust Belt" and Appalachia, the researchers reported.

These earl...

Two-Thirds of Child Abuse Survivors Do Well as Adults

Two in three survivors of childhood sexual abuse have good mental health, but a new study suggests that social isolation, chronic pain, substance abuse and depression can hinder recovery.

Researchers looked at 651 Canadian survivors to identify factors associated with what the researchers call complete mental health.

"Remarkably, two-thirds [65%] of the childhood sexual ...

Gunshot Survivors May Struggle With Emotional Aftermath for Years

Even years after a gunshot wound heals, shooting survivors may be at greater risk of alcohol abuse, drug abuse and unemployment, new research finds.

The study of more than 180 gunshot victims also found that nearly half appeared to have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) years after the incident.

"The effects of gunshot injuries go beyond mortality statistics and function...

Could Fish Oil Be an ADHD Remedy for Some Kids?

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and low blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids might benefit from supplements, new research suggests.

Fish oil supplements appeared to boost attention in these kids, British researchers report.

The effect seemed limited to youngsters who weren't already getting enough omega-3 in their diets, however.

Prior ...

Grandma Isn't So Lonely After All

Even though older adults may have smaller social networks than younger adults, they have similar numbers of close friends and levels of well-being, a new study finds.

"Stereotypes of aging tend to paint older adults in many cultures as sad and lonely," said study lead author Wandi Bruine de Bruin, of the University of Leeds in England.

"But the research shows that older adul...

With Blood Draws, Bedside Manners Matter

How much pain you feel when blood samples are taken could depend on how nice the person wielding the needle is, new research suggests.

Patients were 390% more likely to say their pain was well-controlled when the person taking their blood was courteous, according to a study presented recently at the Anesthesiology annual meeting, in Orlando.

"It's not surprising that a c...

Nature Nurtures Kids

Taking that trek through the woods with your child may do more than build strong muscles.

New research suggests that time spent in nature is also good for their mental and emotional well-being.

"This research shows that children experience profound and diverse benefits through regular contact with nature. Contact with the wild improves children's well-being, motivation and c...

Veterans Often Hit Hard by Deaths of Fellow Soldiers

As Americans pay tribute to all veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces Monday, new research suggests that how comrades died can affect levels of grief among soldiers who served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

"Our goal was to better understand how combat veterans experience the deaths of their military comrades in battle or by suicide, and what factors predict the nature and leve...

Survey Shows Americans Feel Stressed

Mass shootings, health care and the 2020 presidential election are significant causes of stress for American adults, a new survey finds.

The poll of more than 3,600 U.S. adults found that 71% of them said mass shootings are a major source of stress, an increase from 62% in 2018. Hispanics were most likely to say mass shootings are a significant source of stress (84%), foll...

When Music Takes a Surprise Turn, Listening Pleasure Follows

A combination of uncertainty and surprise in chord progression gives you pleasure when you listen to music, a new study shows.

Researchers used a machine learning model to mathematically analyze 80,000 chords in 745 classic U.S. Billboard pop songs. Other elements such as lyrics and melody were stripped out for the analysis.

When listeners were relatively certain about what ...

Exercise Can Help Prevent Depression, Even for Those at High Risk

Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

But that was less likely for people who were more active at the study's ...

Tough Childhoods Can Leave a Lifetime of Harm, Experts Say

Traumatic experiences in childhood can do lifelong harm to physical and mental health, education and work, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says.

Preventing traumatic childhood experiences -- such as abuse, seeing violence or substance abuse in the home, or having a parent in jail -- could reduce many problems later on, according to the CDC.

Among t...

Get Healthier With a Mental Reset

Making the decision to live healthier often involves important steps such as losing weight and exercising more. These are significant goals and everyday lifestyle habits that you should commit to. But there's another type of "makeover" that can benefit you in equally important ways.

That's changing your general outlook on life by boosting positivity. This mental tweak will put you in ...

Risks Mount for Lonely Hearts After Cardiac Surgery

Loneliness can take a heavy toll on heart patients -- including a higher risk of death in the year after hospitalization, researchers found.

"This study confirms what has also been indicated in previous research regarding the serious health consequences of loneliness," said lead researcher Anne Vinggaard Christensen, of Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark.

"Lonelin...

Are You Lonely? Your Tweets Offer Important Clues, Experts Say

Analyzing people's tweets could reveal if they're lonely, researchers say.

Loneliness -- which has been linked with depression, heart disease, dementia and other health problems -- affects about 1 in 5 adults in the United States.

Researchers analyzed public accounts of Twitter users in Pennsylvania and identified more than 6,200 who used words like "lonely" or "alone" more ...

Many U.S. Parents Can't Find a Psychiatrist to Help Their Child

Despite a growing need for mental health care for children and teens -- including a rise in youth suicide -- many areas of the United States lack any child psychiatrists, new research reports.

The study found that almost three-quarters of American counties don't have a single child psychiatrist.

"There are about 17 million children in the United States with a mental health...

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