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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 1459

Mediterranean Diet Could Be a Stress-Buster, Study Finds

The Mediterranean diet has already been shown to be great for a person’s physical health, but new research finds that following the Mediterranean diet also can lift your mood.

People on the diet tended to have lower levels of anxiety and stress, researchers reported recently in the journal...

PTSD Triples Odds for Teeth Grinding, Study Finds

People with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face more than triple the odds of bruxism, otherwise known as teeth grinding, a new study finds.

The small study of 76 Brazilian adults (38 diagnosed with PTSD and 38 without the condition) found much higher incidence of daytime teeth grinding.

�...

More Than 321,000 U.S. Kids Lost a Parent to Drug ODs in a Decade

More than 320,000 U.S. children lost a parent to drug overdose during the past decade, according to a new study reported May 8 in JAMA Psychiatry.

What’s more, the death rate accelerated during the period, more than doubling between 2011 and 2021, researchers found.

About 27 children per 100,000 had a parent di...

Drive to Be 'Perfect' Parent Isn't Healthy, Survey Finds

Parents striving to be “perfect” will never attain that goal, and the aim isn’t even healthy for their families, a new study says.

The risks of striving for perfection are such that researchers have now created a scale to help parents track their burnout and, if necessary, counter it.

The first-of-its-kind

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 8, 2024
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  • How Bad Was Beethoven's Lead Poisoning?

    No one knows what caused the liver and kidney disease that led to Ludwig van Beethoven’s untimely death.

    But one popular theory – that high lead levels killed the great composer – should be ruled out, researchers argue in the journal Clinical Chemistry.

    Analysis of samples taken from preserved locks of Beethoven�...

    A Parent's Watchful Eye Does Keep Kids From Drugs, Alcohol: Study

    Parents can be very effective buzzkills for their teens, just by letting kids know they’re being closely watched, a new study reports.

    Teenagers are less likely to drink, smoke or use drugs when parents keep tabs on their activities, according to f...

    Parental Deaths to Guns, Drugs Harmed Nearly 100,000 U.S. Kids in 2020

    Nearly 100,000 U.S. children lost a parent in 2020 to gun violence or drug overdose, a three-fold rise since 1999, according to a new study.

    Overall, these two causes made up nearly a quarter (23%) of parental losses in 2020, almost double the level cited in 1999, according to a team who reported its findings May 4 in the

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 6, 2024
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  • How 'Unruly' Sports Parents Harm Their Kids' Mental Health

    Everyone knows that specific type of sports parent – the over-the-top dad or mom who curses, shouts and even becomes physically aggressive during their kid’s match.

    While they might think they’re cheering their kid to victory, such poor sports behavior actually can turn a child or teen off to athletics, psychiatrists warn.

    “Some of those behaviors would be setting unrealisti...

    Could You Spot the Silent Symptoms of Stress?

    The silent symptoms of stress can be easily overlooked, but they’re important to recognize to protect one’s mental health, experts say.

    Visible symptoms of stress are fairly obvious – irritability, anger, impatience, muscle tension.

    “You may not be able to hide those for a long time. Immediately, people will notice it – family, friends and co-workers,”

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 4, 2024
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  • More Evidence Supports Psilocybin's Antidepressant Powers

    The active chemical in magic mushrooms could prove to be a powerful antidepressant, a new review finds.

    Psilocybin outperformed a variety of “control” treatments in easing symptoms of depression, researchers reported May 1 in the BMJ.

    Those control groups received either placebo medications, the dietary supplement niacin (vitamin B), or microdoses of psychedelics.

    When in Life Are Folks Most Lonely?

    At what age does loneliness strike adults the hardest?

    A new review maps it out, finding that people are more lonely as young adults, grow less lonely as they approach middle age, and then fall back into loneliness in old age, researchers reported April 30 in the journal Psychological Science.

    “What was striking was how consistent the uptick in loneliness is in older adul...

    Staying Fit Boosts Kids' Mental Health

    The benefits of physical fitness for kids spill over into their mental health, new research shows.

    Getting plenty of exercise may guard against depressive symptoms, anxiety and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study published April 29 in the journal J...

    Loneliness Can Shorten Lives of Cancer Survivors

    Cancer survivors in the throes of loneliness are more likely to die compared to those with companionship, a new study finds.

    Further, people who are the most lonely are the most likely to die, results show.

    “Loneliness, the feeling of being isolated, is a prevalent concern among cancer survivors,” said lead researcher

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2024
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  • A Stolen Dog Feels Like Losing a Child, Study Finds

    The emotional turmoil caused by a stolen dog is akin to that of a parent losing a child, a new study finds.

    The findings support the idea that pets truly become family members to their owners, researchers said. When faced with the theft of a pet, ow...

    Drug, Alcohol Abuse Goes Untreated in Many Ex-Prisoners

    Most ex-cons are unlikely to receive substance use treatment following their release from prison, even though odds are high they are struggling with addiction, a new study finds.

    National estimates suggest as many as 85% of inmates leave prison with some form of substance abuse problem, researchers said.

    But only 17% of ex-cons on Medicaid in Virginia have been diagnosed with substa...

    There's an 'Epidemic' of Loneliness Among U.S. Parents, Poll Finds

    Anne Helms is one busy mom, constantly juggling the demands of working from home with parenting two young children.

    Despite that whirl of activity, Helms says she often feels isolated and lonely.

    “I work from home full time and I actually have a job where I’m on camera a lot and I’m Zoom calling people very often,” Helms, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, said in a news release.<...

    'Dream It, Be It?' Study Finds Teens Who Focus on Life Goals Often Succeed

    “Dream it, be it” might sound like a cliche, but a new study says there’s something to the notion.

    Teenagers who set ambitious goals for themselves tend to be more successful as young adults, researchers reported recently in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology...

    Trying 'Magic Mushroom' Drug to Ease Depression? It Has Side Effects

    Many people with tough-to-treat depression may be trying psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, as an alternative to antidepressants.

    Thinking that it's a "natural" drug, folks might assume it comes without side effects.

    That assumption would be wrong.

    People in a new study who took p...

    Kids With Common Skin Conditions Face Stigma, Bullying

    Acne, psoriasis, eczema, vitiligo, alopecia: Any one of these common skin ailments can render a child vulnerable to stigma and bullying at school, new research confirms.

    “These chronic skin conditions can be tremendously life-altering, including shaping psychosocial development,” noted study corresponding author

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 24, 2024
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  • Stigma, Shame Hit Many Gay Men Affected by Mpox Outbreak

    A British study finds that beyond the physical pain and turmoil of an mpox diagnosis, many of the mostly gay and bisexual men infected during the 2022 outbreak faced stigma, homophobia and shame.

    Mpox is spread largely through skin-to-skin contact, and the outbreak in Europe and the United States was largely localized to men who have sex with men. Cases were first detected in May of 2022...

    Teens Often Bullied Online About Their Weight: Study

    Teenagers are frequently bullied about their weight on social media, and the bullying increases with each hour they spend on these sites, a new study reveals.

    Nearly one in five teens (17%) said they’d experienced weight-related bullying online,...

    Most Homeless Americans Are Battling Mental Illness

    Two-thirds of homeless people are experiencing some form of mental health disorder, a large, new review of data on the subject.

    The analysis found that men who are homeless are more likely to be battling mental illness than women, although rates were high for both genders compared to the general population.

    There are signs that rates of mental illness may be on the rise among homele...

    Could Some HIV Meds Also Fight Alzheimer's?

    In a new study, people living with HIV who got standard meds to keep the virus at bay also had much lower rates of Alzheimer's disease -- suggesting the drugs might also lower risks for the brain illness.

    It's early-stage research, but it's possible that mechanisms used by these HIV drugs work at a ...

    A More Diverse Nature Brings Better Mental Health

    Want to feel happier?

    Live in or near a place with a rich diversity of nature, a new study says.

    Environments with plentiful natural features -- trees, birds, plants and rivers -- are associated with better mental well-being than the more spartan landscapes of suburbia, researchers found.

    Further, spending time in areas like this can provide benefits that last up to eight hour...

    Parents, You Can Ease a Teen's Stress Around Standardized Tests

    Standardized tests put a lot of pressure on teenagers who want to secure their future and make their parents and teachers proud.

    This stress can lead to symptoms like stomach aches, sleep problems, irritability and heightened emotionality, experts say.

    But there are concrete steps students can take to prepare for a standardized test while also keeping their cool.

    Live ...

    Parks, Forests Boost Preschoolers' Mental Health

    Toddlers who grow up near nature are less likely to have emotional issues, even if the green space is just a park or a big back yard, a new study shows.

    The more green space there is within three-fourths of a mile from a child's home, the fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression they'll hav...

    Black and Native Americans Hit Hardest by 'Deaths of Despair'

    More middle-aged Black and Native Americans are now falling prey to “deaths of despair” than whites, a new study finds.

    These deaths -- from suicide, drug overdose and alcoholic liver disease -- initially had been more common among whites.

    But a new analysis has determined that deaths of despair have skyrocketed for Black and Native Americans over the past decade.

    The deat...

    Antipsychotics Help Ease Episodes of Marijuana-Induced Psychosis

    Overuse of marijuana is increasingly being linked to dangerous bouts of psychosis, and a new study finds that antipsychotics may be needed to keep such patients out of the hospital.

    Psychotic episodes involve a dangerous psychiatric state in which people lose their c...

    Rising Threat to Americans' Healthy Sleep: Neighborhood Gunfire

    A good night's sleep is often hampered by caffeine, hunger, alcohol or chronic pain.

    Now, America has a new cause of poor sleep: the sound of gunfire on city streets.

    New research shows that gunshots are twice as likely to occur at night, mostly affecting the sleep of people in low...

    Tough Work Hours in 20s, 30s Tied to Worse Health Decades Later

    A rotten work schedule in young adulthood can affect a person's middle-aged health, a new study finds.

    Young adults who worked shifts outside the usual 9-to-5 schedule were more likely to report worse sleep and symptoms of depression in their 50s, researchers discovered.

    �...

    Too Often, Postpartum Depression Goes Untreated in Black, Hispanic Women

    Massive racial disparities exist in the treatment of pregnancy-related mood disorders in the United States, a new study shows.

    White women suffering from depression or anxiety during or after pregnancy are nearly twice as likely receive treatment as women of color are, ...

    Sports Gambling, Binge Drinking a Dangerous Duo for Health

    People who gamble on sports are more likely to be binge drinkers as well, a new report finds.

    Both women and men who bet on sports were at least twice as likely to binge drink compared to non-gamblers, results showed. Further, the odds of binge drinking increased with the frequency of gambling.

    “With past research showing that sports gamblers are more likely to report symptoms of ...

    Could the Keto Diet Help Ease Psychiatric Conditions?

    Patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder tend to see their conditions ease after four months on the ketogenic ("keto") diet, a small pilot study finds.

    While no one is saying the diet should replace standard medications, the researchers believe it could provide additional help for some.

    “It's very promising and very encouraging that you can take back control of your illnes...

    Big Improvements Seen in Spotting, Treating Mental Health Issues Around Pregnancy

    Expecting or new mothers are much more likely these days to be diagnosed with anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows.

    However, more women are also getting treated for these problems rather than roughing it out, researchers report in A...

    Monthly Injection Curbs Opioid Cravings, But Few Treatment Centers Use It

    A monthly long-acting injection of buprenorphine can be an easier and more effective therapy for people struggling with opioid addiction, but treatment centers aren't much interested in using it, a new study discovers.

    Only one-third of treatment facilities (33%) offer long-acting buprenorphine injections to patients, according to findings published recently in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 1, 2024
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  • Telehealth May Help People Stick With Alcoholism Treatment

    Telehealth might be a more effective way of treating alcoholism than in-person therapy sessions, a new study reports.

    Alcoholics who receive treatment through telehealth were more likely to engage in more therapy visits and stick to anti-alcohol medication longer than those who venture out for alcohol use disorder therapy, researchers found.

    These results are “particularly importa...

    Steady Rise in U.S. Suicides Among Adolescents, Teens

    U.S. rates of suicide by all methods rose steadily for adolescents between 1999 and 2020, a new analysis shows.

    During those two decades, over 47,000 Americans between the ages 10 and 19 lost their lives to suicide, the report found, and there have been sharp increases year by year.

    Girls and minority adolescents have charted especially steep increases in suicides, said a team le...

    Mutation Helps Even Carriers of 'Alzheimer's Gene' Avoid Alzheimer's

    A genetic mutation that boosts cell function could protect people against Alzheimer's disease, even if they carry another gene mutation known to boost dementia risk.

    The newly discovered mutation appears to protect people who...

    What Is 'Mindful Reading' and Can It Help Your Brain?

    Ever immersed yourself in a book and lost all sense of the time and place you're currently in?

    That's how reading can meld with mindfulness, one neuropsychologist explains.

    The experience can bring real mental health benefits, said

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2024
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  • High Rate of Suicidal Thoughts Among Black Men in Rural America: Study

    Suicidal thoughts and contemplation of death haunt the minds of many rural Black men in the United States, a new study reports.

    One in three rural Black men said they had such dark thoughts within the past two weeks, University of Georgia researchers found.

    These thoughts are driven by childhood trauma, poverty and exposure to racism, all of which take a heavy toll on mental health ...

    FDA May Ban Electroshock Devices Used on Some Psychiatric Patients

    Federal regulators are taking a second stab at banning the controversial use of electroshock devices to manage the behavior of patients with intellectual and developmental disorders.

    The devices deliver electric shocks to a patient's skin, in an attempt to stop them from harming themselves or lashing out physically at others, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said in its Monday ...

    Many Kids Worry About Missing School Due to Illness: Poll

    Most parents are torn about letting their middle or high school students take a sick day.

    "In some cases, the decision to keep kids home from school is clear, such as if the child is vomiting or has a high fever," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the Mott Poll from University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children's H...

    Rare Condition Makes Others' Faces Appear 'Demonic'

    Some people diagnosed with schizophrenia might instead be suffering from a rare visual condition that can cause other people's faces to appear “demonic,” a new study argues.

    The condition, called prosopometamorphopsia (PMO), can cause others' facial features to appear horrific -- drooped, larger, smaller, out of position or stretched in disturbing ways.

    “Not surprisingly, peo...

    Body Dysmorphia Affects Many Teens, Especially Girls

    Many teens – especially girls – are affected by body dysmorphic disorder, a condition in which they become obsessed with perceived flaws in their personal appearance, a new study shows.

    BDD affects about two in every 100 teens (1.9%), according to a report published March 17 in the Journal of the American Acad...

    Common Epilepsy, Migraine Drug Won't Raise Odds for Autism in Offspring

    A common antiseizure drug used to treat epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorder does not appear to increase the risk of autism for kids exposed to it in the womb, a new study says.

    Topiramate does not contribute to any ri...

    Knitting Helps Keep Troubled Minds From Unraveling, Study Finds

    Stressed out, anxious or desperately needing to recharge?

    Grab some knitting needles and a pretty ball of yarn -- Swedish research shows yarncraft improves mental health without medication.

    "Knitters have a creative leisure interest that can also help them cope with life and so improve their mental health," said first author

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 21, 2024
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  • As Treatments Ease Anxiety, Heart Risks Also Decline

    People with heart disease can stay healthier if they address their emotional problems as well as their physical ailments, a new study says.

    Treating anxiety and depression reduced ER visits and hospitalizations among patients with heart disease, researchers ...

    U.S. Falls Out of Top 20 in 'World's Happiest Countries' List

    For the first time, the United States has fallen out of the top 20 spots on the annual world's happiest nations list.

    Americans are now No. 23, far behind the top five countries -- Finland (No. 1), Denmark, Iceland, Sweden and Israel. 

    "The...

    One in 10 U.S. School-Age Kids Have ADHD: Report

    About 1 in every 10 U.S. children ages 5 to 17 has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to the latest government statistics.

    The data from the National Health Interview Survey covers the years 2020 through 2022 and came from in-person or phone interviews involving a representative sample of American homes.

    It found that 11.3% of school-age c...

    Staying Social Vital for People With Alzheimer's, Caregivers

    People with dementia -- and their caregivers -- need active social lives to stay healthy, a new study reports.

    However, researchers found that both dementia patients and their caregivers had declining social connections as the disease progressed.

    Patients' social netw...

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