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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 680

Depression During Menopause: How to Spot It and Treat It

Emotional changes in the run-up to menopause can sometimes lead to depression.

It can be important to see a doctor to help determine whether you're just feeling stressed or "blue" -- or whether you might have clinical or major depression, a condition associated with a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Changing hormones during perimenopause -- the time when a woman's body is preparing...

Do Your Genes Up Your Odds for Alcoholism? One Factor Cuts the Risk

Even when genetics and personality are working against you, having a strong network of supportive friends and family may help lower alcoholism risk, researchers say.

"Genes play an important role in alcohol use," stressed Jinni Su, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University in Tempe, and lead author of a new study.

But "genes are not our destiny," she added.

In Your Sights: How Eye Contact Enhances a Conversation

Seeing eye to eye -- literally -- makes conversations more appealing, a new study finds.

"Eye contact is really immersive and powerful," said researcher Sophie Wohltjen, a graduate student in psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth College.

"When two people are having a conversation, eye contact signals that shared attention is high -- that they are in peak synchrony with one ...

Anxious? Maybe You Can Exercise It Away

Anxiety prevention may be just a snowy trail away.

New research suggests cross-country skiers -- and perhaps others who also exercise vigorously -- are less prone to develop anxiety disorders than less active folks.

Researchers in Sweden spent roughly two decades tracking anxiety risk among more than 395,000 Swedes. Nearly half the participants were skiers with a history of competin...

Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • September 12, 2021
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  • Getting Your First COVID Shot Can Boost Mental Health: Study

    When you got your first COVID-19 jab, did you breathe a sigh of relief? If so, you're not alone.

    U.S. adults who got the vaccine between December 2020 and March 2021 experienced a 4% reduction in their risk of being mildly depressed and a 15% drop in their risk of severe depression, researchers reported Sept. 8 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    "People who got vaccinated experienced a reduct...

    Would More Free Time Really Make You Happier?

    Many people feel their to-do list is overloaded, but there is also such a thing as too much free time, a new study suggests.

    In a series of studies, researchers found that having either too little or too much free time seemed to drain people's sense of well-being.

    It's no surprise that constantly feeling pressed for time -- and the stress that creates -- can take a toll on well-bein...

    Adults With Autism, Mental Illness May Be at Higher Risk for Severe COVID

    Adults with autism, intellectual disabilities or mental health disorders are at increased risk for COVID-19 and severe illness, researchers report.

    Being aware of the heightened risk is important in prioritizing COVID-19 prevention measures, such as vaccination, testing, masking and distancing for these groups, the researchers said.

    "These high-risk populations should be recognized ...

    Annoyed When Watching Others Fidget? You're Not Alone

    If other people's fidgeting drives you nuts, you may be one of many people with a condition called misokinesia, which means "hatred of movements," Canadian researchers report.

    They conducted experiments with more than 4,100 people and found that about one-third have the condition.

    Typically, folks with misokinesia "experience reactions such as anger, anxiety or frustration" watching...

    Transgender People Face Twice the Odds for Early Death: Study

    Transgender people have double the odds of dying early compared to folks whose identity matches the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), a long-term study finds.

    And the added risk did not decrease over time, according to an analysis of data collected from more than 4,500 transgender people in the Netherlands between 1972 and 2018.

    Study author Martin den Heijer said the ri...

    Mind & Body: Marriage, City Living May Help When Heart Disease Strikes

    Feelings of despair and hopelessness can raise the odds of death in people battling heart disease, and new research suggests that where you live, as well as your marital status, can also play a role.

    The study found that heart disease patients who lived in rural areas and were unmarried were more likely to feel hopeless.

    "Because we know hopelessness is predictive of death in p...

    College Is Even More Stressful for Girls: Study

    Even before COVID-19, college could be a challenging experience, but a new study suggests those stresses are much higher for female students.

    Still, in the face of a continuing pandemic, all students may need interventions to develop healthy coping strategies, the study authors said.

    "They're balancing work, classes, relationships and family -- and then now you're throwing COVID on...

    Feel Guilty About 'Useless' Leisure Time? Your Mental Health Might Suffer

    Struggling to decide whether to spend another hour at the office or take a late afternoon stroll?

    Put on your walking shoes.

    Making leisure time a priority is good for your mental health. For many, though, especially folks who prize productivity above all, it's a hard sell, a new study finds.

    "There is plenty of research which suggests that leisure has mental health benefits ...

    Parents, Look Out for Mental Health Issues as College Kids Return to Class

    This year of pandemic isolation and anxiety has been tough for many, but an expert says college students are at particularly high risk for mental health issues as they transition from adolescence to adulthood.

    As students return to their campuses, it's important for parents to monitor their young adults' mental health, said Dr. Richard Catanzaro, chief of behavioral health at Northern Wes...

    Having Someone Who'll Listen May Be Good for Your Aging Brain

    Could the constancy of a sympathetic ear help guard your brain against the ravages of aging?

    Yes, claims new research that analyzed data on nearly 2,200 American adults and found those in their 40s and 50s who didn't have someone to listen to them had a mental ("cognitive") age that was four years older than those who had good listeners in their lives.

    Having an ear to bend when you...

    Only 1 in 10 Kids With ADHD Will Outgrow It

    Struggling with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a child is heart-breaking enough, but now new research confirms what many have long suspected: These patients will often continue to be plagued by ADHD symptoms as adults.

    Only about one in 10 kids with the disorder are likely to have a full and lasting remission of their symptoms, according to new data gleaned from tracki...

    Lyme Disease Can Wreak Havoc on Mental Health

    Lyme disease can exact a significant mental toll as well as a physical one on its sufferers, a new study confirms.

    Patients hospitalized for Lyme disease had a 28% higher incidence of mental disorders and were twice as likely to attempt suicide than people without Lyme, researchers report.

    "These findings highlight the need for greater awareness in the medical community that patien...

    Ketamine Appears Safe as Therapy for Tough-to-Treat Depression

    The anesthesia drug ketamine and a related medicine called esketamine appear to be safe for tough-to-treat depression, researchers report.

    A number of studies have suggested that low doses of ketamine, which is also abused as a club drug under monikers that include "K" and "Special K," provide rapid antidepressant effects, typically improving mood within 24 hours to seven days.

    Sim...

    Why Losing Someone to Violence Can Be Especially Tough to Get Over

    It can take years for a survivor of a traumatic event to recover from the loss of a loved one, new research shows, but treating the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) early may help prevent what's called complicated grief.

    "Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic losses may severely harm survivors for years," said lead study autho...

    More 'Green Time,' Less Screen Time Boosts Kids' Mental Health

    Want to see a temperamental tween or teen act happier?

    The formula is simple, a large international study suggests.

    "Screen time should be replaced by 'green time' for optimizing the well-being of our kids," said study author Asad Khan, an associate professor in biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

    That advice stems from survey...

    Heading Back to the Workplace? Here's Some Tips to Help Re-Adjust

    Freaked out about trading Zoom meetings and the privacy of working at home for a return to the office?

    You've got plenty of company. As more workplaces reopen, stress about health risks and new routines is front and center.

    The Center for Workplace Mental Health knows what you're are going through. The center, a program of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Foundation, is of...

    Death of Spouse Could Raise Men's Odds for Prostate Cancer

    Widowers have a higher risk for advanced prostate cancer than men who are part of a couple, Canadian researchers say.

    The new findings are from an analysis of 12 studies comparing 14,000 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 12,000 healthy men.

    The study -- recently published in the European Journal of Epidemiology -- suggests that social environment is an important ...

    Blood Test Spots Biological Markers for Schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating disease that can make navigating daily life a massive challenge, but a new blood test could flag it in its early stages, researchers say.

    Their analysis of blood samples identified epigenetic markers -- part of your DNA -- that differ between people with schizophrenia and those without the mental health disorder.

    The researchers developed a model to a...

    Kids of Heavy Drinkers Face Multiple Threats to Health

    Death, injuries, abuse and mental health disorders are among the many harms faced by children whose parents are heavy drinkers, Danish researchers say.

    "Within the last 10 years, there has been an expansion of research on consequences that extend beyond the drinker," wrote lead author Julie Brummer, a doctoral student in psychology and behavioral sciences at Aarhus University, Denmark, an...

    Pandemic Stresses Enough to Trigger Political, Social Unrest: Analysis

    The psychological strains of the pandemic can be powerful tinder for political unrest and violence, researchers warn.

    "The pandemic has disrupted our normal way of living, generating frustrations, unprecedented social exclusion, and a range of other concerns," said study author Henrikas Bartusevičius, a researcher with the Peace Research Institute Oslo in Norway. "Our investigations show...

    Gruesome Cigarette Warnings May Work on Smokers: Study

    Gangrene. Throat cancer. A newborn on a feeding tube.

    Gruesome warning images like those on cigarette packs do indeed scare smokers, but they should be combined with other anti-smoking measures, a new study finds.

    These kinds of graphic warning labels were approved by U.S. lawmakers in 2009, but implementation has been stalled until legal challenges to the law by the tobacco industr...

    Women Can Dance Themselves to Better Health After Menopause

    Better health and self-image might just be a samba or some funky moves away.

    That's true for postmenopausal women who, a new study says, can dance their way to better physical and emotional health.

    "In addition to the positive effects on physical, metabolic and mental health aspects, dance promotes a moment of leisure, fun, socialization, self-knowledge and many other b...

    The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

    Americans living in big cities have relatively low rates of depression, despite the hustle and bustle -- or maybe because of it, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with smaller U.S. cities, big urban hubs generally had lower rates of depressionamong residents. And they think the pattern can be explained, in part, by the wide range of social interactions that busy cities...

    AHA News: Protecting Children's Mental Health as They Head Back to School

    At-home schooling was no vacation for Francis Huang and her 11-year-old daughter, Cheyenne Kuo.

    The COVID-19 pandemic thrust remote learning upon their family in spring 2020. With it came the stresses now familiar to millions of families. "I think the whole year, we just tried to survive," said Huang, who lives in suburban Dallas.

    In August, they finally leave all that behind, when ...

    Acne Can Take Big Emotional Toll on Women

    Acne is more than skin deep.

    This is the overarching message of a new study that looked at the mental and psychological toll that acne can take on adult women.

    "Some felt that their acne made them appear less professional or qualified at work, and many described that having fewer peers with acne in adulthood magnified the impact of acne on their mental health, leading to feelings of...

    Loneliness Raises Opioid Dangers in Seniors: Study

    Illustrating a heartbreaking cycle, new research finds that lonely seniors are much more likely to take opioid painkillers, sedatives, anti-anxiety drugs and other medications.

    This puts them at increased risk for drug dependency, attention problems, falls, accidents and mental decline, the University of California, San Francisco researchers warned.

    "There's a misconception that as ...

    Testosterone's Ties to Success May Be a Myth

    Higher levels of testosterone don't give men or women an edge in life, claims a new study that challenges a common belief.

    "There's a widespread belief that a person's testosterone can affect where they end up in life. Our results suggest that, despite a lot of mythology surrounding testosterone, its social implication...

    Pandemic Boosted Paranoia and Conspiracy Theories, Study Confirms

    The COVID-19 pandemic upended life in the United States in many ways. Now, a new study confirms another effect: paranoia and belief in conspiracy theories, especially in areas with low adherence to mask mandates.

    "Our psychology is massively impacted by the state of the world around us," said study author Phil Corlett, an associate professor of psychology at Yale University, in New Haven,...

    How Trust in Science Can Make You Vulnerable to 'Pseudoscience'

    Trusting science is good, but it could put you at risk for being duped by false science, or "pseudoscience," if you let your guard down, researchers warn.

    Investigators found that people who trust science are more likely to believe and share false claims that contain scientific references than those who don't trust science.

    "We conclude that trust in science, although desirable in m...

    Who's Most Likely to Get Bullied at School?

    Bullying remains a threat to American teens, and a new study reveals which kids may be at highest risk.

    Race-based bullying takes a heavy toll on teens, the research found, but minority kids who are picked on for other reasons -- whether gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability or immigration status -- suffer a double whammy.

    Victims' physical and mental health suffer a...

    Worry, Depression, Burnout: Survey Finds College Students Stressed as Fall Term Nears

    Like many of her peers, Ohio State University engineering student Mary Trabue spent much of the pandemic taking classes online. And she was struggling.

    "I don't know what was wrong, but I just felt tired all the time because I wasn't sleeping," she said. "And I knew I couldn't continue down that path."

    Whether a question of COVID-related depression, anxiety, burnout or all of t...

    Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

    A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

    The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson's.

    The new study, published July 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine, ...

    PTSD Common After Sexual Assault, But Eases for Most

    Most sexual assault survivors have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately after the attack, but it tends to lessen over the following months, a new study finds.

    "One of the main takeaways is that the majority of recovery from post-traumatic stress happens in the first three months," said study lead author Emily Dworkin, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral scienc...

    Empty Stadiums, COVID Fears: How Will It Affect Olympic Athletes?

    To do their best, Olympic athletes need to be both physically and mentally fit, but the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics has made that a real challenge, experts say.

    "This Olympics is unprecedented," said Dr. Michael Lardon, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

    The Tokyo Olympics itself, which officiall...

    Lockdowns' Effects on Health Still Less Than Harm From Pandemic: Experts

    While there's been much talk about pandemic lockdowns being a burden on people's health, new research finds the effects of large COVID-19 outbreaks are typically worse.

    "It is unlikely that government interventions have been worse than the pandemic itself in most situations," say the authors of an international study published July 19 in the BMJ Global Health.

    There's been ...

    Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

    About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

    Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, hallucinations and psychosis.

    About one-third of the stricken kids had symptoms that didn't resolve in the short te...

    How Your Kid's Education Could Make You Healthier

    If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

    Do Women or Men Make the Best Doctors?

    When you're hospitalized, you'll want qualified medical professionals treating you, but does it matter if your doctor is a man or a woman?

    It might.

    A new study in Canada found that patients cared for by female physicians had lower in-hospital death rates than those who had male doctors.

    "Our study overall shows that female doctors have lower patient death rates compared to ...

    Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

    Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination -- advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

    But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll reveal...

    Remote Learning Hurt High School Students Academically, Emotionally

    There were academic, social and emotional consequences for U.S. high school students who attended classes remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    The study included more than 6,500 students in Orange County Public Schools in Florida, who were surveyed in October 2020, when two-thirds were attending school remotely and one-third were attending in person.

    On a 100-p...

    Most Romantic Couples Started Out as Friends, Study Finds

    Some think that romance begins when two strangers catch each other's eye across a crowded room. Others seek it out by swiping right.

    But new research suggests that more than two-thirds of all romantic relationships begin as friendships.

    It's a question that Danu Anthony Stinson and her collaborators have been asking for a long time while studying relationship initiation.

    "We s...

    Growing Up in Lead-Contaminated Area Might Alter Personality: Study

    Can childhood lead exposure affect personality into adulthood?

    Yes, a big multi-decade study suggests.

    The finding stems from an analysis of data on atmospheric lead levels across the United States and 37 European nations since 1960. Lead levels were stacked up against responses to a personality survey of roughly 1.5 million men and women.

    The result: Americans raised in areas...

    Sleepless Nights Can Quickly Mess Up Your Emotions

    Groggy? Grumpy? Depressed? Just a few nights of poor sleep can take a big toll on your mental health, a new study confirms

    "Many of us think that we can pay our sleep debt on weekends and be more productive on weekdays," said lead author Soomi Lee, an assistant professor in the School of Aging Studies at the University of South Florida.

    "However, results from this study show that having...

    Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

    Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality -- and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

    The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological basis for human spirituality.

    "It is something of a treacherous subject to navigate," said lead researcher Michael Fe...

    Autism & Drinking, Drug Abuse Can Be Dangerous Mix

    Teens and adults with autism may be less likely than others to use drugs and alcohol, but new research finds those who do are nearly nine times more likely to use these substances to mask symptoms, including those related to autism.

    This is known as camouflaging, and it has been linked to mental health issues and increased risk for suicide among people with autism.

    "Seeing such star...

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