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Results for search "Child Development".

28 Jun

1 in 4 Parents Worry Their Child Isn't Reaching Milestones

While the majority of parents worried about their child's development seek advice from healthcare providers, many still turn to the internet or family and friends, researchers say.

Health News Results - 403

No Link Between Antidepressants in Pregnancy, Epilepsy in Children

There's good news for women with a mental health condition: Taking antidepressants early in pregnancy doesn't increase a baby's risk of having epilepsy or seizures, researchers say.

"The findings of this study are very important," said study co-author Ayesha Sujan of Indiana University Bloomington. "Pregnancy can be a trying time, and the addition of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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  • Pregnant American Women Are Facing Higher Exposures to Chemicals

    Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study warns.

    "This is the first time we've been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women — not just identify chemicals,...

    Better School Lunches Blunt U.S. Kids' Weight Gain

    MONDAY, May 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- America's kids have a weight problem, but regulations that boosted the nutritional standards for school meals may have helped slowed down weight gain among low-income students, a new study finds.

    For decades, the National School Lunch Program has provided free or low-cost...

    There's a Secret to Getting Kids to Eat Vegetables

    Do you have a child who refuses to eat anything green? Rewarding them for trying new vegetables may make them more willing to eat them, a new study claims.

    "It's important to start eating vegetables from a young age," said lead rese...

    Kids' Sleep Suffers When Parents Can't Afford Diapers

    It might seem like an unlikely connection at first, but a new study finds that infants and toddlers suffer sleep issues -- and maybe other problems --- when their parents can't afford diapers.

    "Sleep promotes brain development and solidifies learning and memory," noted study co-author Sallie Porter, an associate professor at Rutgers School of Nursing in New Jersey. "Children with

    Obesity May Be Affecting Heart Health in Kids as Young as 6

    WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- As early as age 6, children who carry extra weight could be headed down a path toward future diabetes or heart disease, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 1,000 Danish children, found that kids who were overweigh...

    Most Transgender Children Stick With Gender Identity 5 Years Later: Study

    WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who feel their true gender identity doesn't match the sex they were given at birth are sometimes given the chance to adopt the lifestyle and characteristics of the opposite gender, in a process known as "so...

    Could a Stressed-Out Pregnancy Hinder a Toddler's Development?

    TUESDAY, May 3, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born to women who are stressed out during pregnancy may be more likely to experience social, emotional and learning problems as they grow up, new research suggests.

    "Mom's elevated psychological distress affects not...

    Are Vegetarian Diets Healthy for Growing Kids?

    MONDAY, May 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Vegetarian diets are a healthy choice for growing kids -- though they may slightly raise the odds of youngsters being underweight, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 9,000 young children, found that those on vegetarian diets were, on average, of similar weight and height as their peers who ate meat. They were also on par w...

    When Is the Right Time to Tell a Child They Have Autism?

    MONDAY, May 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Bella Kofner, a 24-year-old graduate student in special education at the College of Staten Island in New York, was 10 when her parents first told her she had autism. Developmental psychologist Steven Kapp, now 35, was 13 when he was told the same.

    So, is there a best time to tell children they have the developmental disorder? New ...

    Teen Brain Naturally Tunes Out Mom's Voice

    FRIDAY, April 29, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Mom's voice may be music to a young child's brain, but the teen brain prefers to change the station, a new study finds.

    Past research using brain imaging has revealed how important a mother's voice is to younger children: The sound stimulates not only hearing-related parts of the brain, but also circuits involved i...

    Another Long-Term Health Issue Tied to Abuse in Childhood: Cholesterol

    The toll of child abuse is wide-ranging and long-lasting. Researchers warn that childhood abuse is tied to high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes in adulthood, raising odds for heart disease and stroke.

    In contrast, those who grew up in nurturing homes are less likely to have heart disease risk factors.

    "Our findings demonstrate how the negative and positive experiences we have in chi...

    Kids Who Witness Domestic Violence May Suffer Mentally for Decades

    Witnessing violence between your parents is traumatic when it happens, but a new study finds that trauma can raise your risk of depression and other mental health problems.

    The study included more than 17,700 Canadian adults who took part in a national survey on mental health. Of those respondents, 326 sa...

    Virtual Learning Didn't Slow Preschoolers' Reading Skills

    Preschoolers can learn reading skills in a virtual classroom, University of Washington researchers say.

    "Children are ready to learn to read at the age of 5. But the pandemic robbed children of the opportunity for in-person reading instruction," said Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS), in Seattle. "What we've shown here is that an online re...

    Lead Exposure Harms Kids in Many Ways

    New studies add to the extensive body of research showing the many risks that lead poses to youngsters.

    The association between lead exposure and children's IQ is well-documented, but these Univers...

    Family Structure Influences Teen Delinquency

    The structure of teens' families influences their risk of delinquent behaviors such as shoplifting, graffiti or robbery, new research suggests.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed survey data gathered between 2016 and 2019 from more than 3,800 14- and 15-year-olds in Sweden. They used a statistical measure called incident rate ratio, or IRR, to compare groups.

    "This study shows...

    Nap at Preschool May Boost Tots' Learning

    Many parents of preschoolers insist that naps are essential to recharge their little ones during the day and improve their mood.

    Turns out that daytime shut-eye may also boost early literacy skills.

    New research by scholars in Australia and England suggests that naps help preschoolers map...

    Does Social Media Harm Kids? It Might Depend on Their Age

    Your child's risk of harm from social media is higher at certain ages and it's different for girls and boys, researchers report.

    To figure out how social media use affected "life satisfaction" among 10- to 21-year-olds, the investigators analyzed long-term data on 17,400 young people in the United Kingdom.

    The

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • Early-Life Day Care Tied to Worsening Behavior in Kids

    The more time kids spend in day care, the greater their risk for problem behaviors in primary school, according to a Swiss study.

    But, parents can take heart: The study also found that such problems generally disappear by the end of primary school.

    "It's possible that external childcare may lessen the strength of child-parent attachment and interaction," said first author Margit Ave...

    Child Developmental Milestone Checklists Updated by CDC, AAP

    Screen your young child early and often for developmental delays.

    That's the message behind updated checklists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

    The

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  • February 21, 2022
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  • Does Your Child Have Asthma? Look for the Signs

    If you're wondering whether your child may have asthma, there are some tell-tale signs to look for, an expert says.

    Asthma is the most common chronic respiratory disease in children and affects more than 6 million U.S. children. Despite being common, diagnosing asthma in children can be difficult because "there is...

    Poll Finds Most Parents Would Use CBD to Treat a Child — Is That Wise?

    Cannabidiol (CBD) products are wildly popular among older adults for treating chronic pain and anxiety, and a new poll suggests that nearly three-quarters of U.S. parents think CBD might also be a good option for their kids when other meds don't work.

    On the other hand, more than that — 83% — think

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  • February 21, 2022
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  • Sleepless Children Often Become Sleepless Adults: Study

    Young children who struggle with insomnia face a very high risk for more of the same as young adults, a new study warns.

    Investigators found that 43% of children who suffer from insomnia between the ages of 5 and 12 continue to do so when they hit their 20s and 30s.

    And that amounts to a nea...

    Girls With Type 2 Diabetes at Higher Risk for Ovarian Cysts

    Here's yet another consequence of America's childhood obesity epidemic: New research shows that girls with type 2 diabetes can set themselves up for developing a condition known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PCOS occurs when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones t...

    Lockdowns May Not Have Harmed Toddlers' Language Learning: Studies

    The pandemic has dramatically disrupted kids' normal routines, but a new study suggests the initial lockdowns of 2020 did not necessarily hinder preschoolers' language development.

    In fact, researchers found, there was an unanticipated "lockdown boost" in youngsters' vocabulary growth -- possibly because parents were spending more time at home.

    Studying families in 13 countries, the...

    Gruesome Warning Images on Soda Labels Could Cut Consumption

    Images of fat-laden, diseased hearts and blackened, rotting feet might be the last thing you expect to see on the label of a can of soda that your child desperately wants, but would such drastic health warnings about the long-term dangers of sugar stop you from buying it?

    Yes, suggests new research that finds parents were 17 percentage points less likely to buy sugary beverages if confron...

    More Evidence Pot Use in Pregnancy Is Bad for Baby

    So, you're pregnant and battling nausea every day. What harm could come from smoking a joint to settle your stomach?

    Plenty, according to a new study that suggests women who use pot while expecting put their infants at risk for some serious health problems.

    The problems included

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 1, 2022
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  • The 'Oreo Test' and Other Ways to Help Kids' Oral Health

    Worried your kid isn't brushing his or her teeth properly? You might want to try the Oreo test.

    "If the child eats an Oreo and brushes their teeth and the parent can still see the Oreos, they need to be checking and helping them brush," said Elise Sarvas, a clinical associate professor of pediatric dentistry with the University of Minnesota.

    Sarvas offers up the Oreo test and other ...

    Getting Your School-Age Child Into a Healthy Sleep Routine

    Most parents have dealt with having to hurry a sleepy child out the door on a school morning, but experts say taking the time to establish good sleep routines for your kids is worth the effort.

    Amid the pandemic, there can be a great deal of uncertainty around school, but a set sleep regimen can help ease youngsters'

    Pandemic Especially Tough on Kids With ADHD

    Living through the pandemic has not been easy for kids, but it has really thrown off children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research warns.

    Though they were not more likely to catch COVID-19, they were more likely to experience symptoms if they were infected. But the damage did not stop there: These children were also more likely to have trouble sleeping, f...

    3 Factors Helped Teens Stay Mentally Healthy During Pandemic

    Support from family and friends, along with exercise and sufficient sleep, have helped protect teens' mental health during the pandemic, new research shows.

    The study also found that teen girls have been more likely than boys to suffer mental distress during the pandemic.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data gathered from more than 3,000 participants, aged 11 to 14, in the

    U.S. Teens Were Already in Mental Health Crisis Before Pandemic Hit

    MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Alaina Stanisci has grappled with an eating disorder since she was 10, and the disruptions of the pandemic only made things worse for the high school senior.

    "I actually experienced a relapse at the beginning of the pandemic because of this lack of structure," Stanisci, 18, of Mountain Lakes, N.J., said during a HealthDay Now interview. "D...

    Exposing Kids to Safe Levels of Peanut When Young Might Prevent Allergy

    Some kids might be able to get over their peanut allergy if they start immunotherapy while they're still toddlers, a major new clinical trial reports.

    In the trial, a group of 1- to 3-year-olds with severe peanut allergies were safely fed gradually increasing daily doses...

    Spit Test: Saliva Alerts Babies to Close Relationships

    Sharing food and smooching are two ways babies can suss out whom they can depend on to take care for them, a new study suggests.

    The tell-tale clue common to both is a surprising one: saliva.

    “Babies don’t know in advance which relationships are the close and morally obligating ones, so they have to ha...

    Visiting a 'Dental Fear' Clinic Can Help Improve a Child's Smile

    If the sound of a dental drill sends shivers up your spine, you're likely in good company: Finnish researchers say that one of every two adults fear the dentist at least a little, while one in 10 are very afraid.

    But the researchers added that a local dentistry program has found a novel way to turn screams into smiles, by exposing patients as young as 2 to a series of desensitizing exams ...

    Baby's Feeding Troubles Tied to Later Developmental Delays

    Parents struggling with infant feeding issues may have another reason to persevere: New research ties feeding problems with an increased risk of developmental delays.

    For the study, the mothers of nearly 3,600 children were surveyed about feeding problems at 18, 24 and 30 months of age, such as gagging, crying during meals or pushing food away. The children were also screened for developm...

    Study Bolsters Effectiveness of 'Guided Play' for Learning

    Hands-on learning can be fun, and new research suggests that it works as well as more traditional teaching methods.

    Known as "guided play," the technique involves educational activities that are gently steered by an adult but give kids the freedom to explore while learning. They include games that require children to read, write or use math.

    "The argument is sometimes made that play...

    'Baby Talk' Could Help Spot Infants With Autism

    That sing-song speech parents use when talking to their babies is universal, and infants tend to prefer it.

    So, when a baby doesn't seem to engage with this melodic "motherese," or baby talk, it can be an early sign of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Researchers at the University of California, S...

    Is the Pandemic Affecting Newborns' Brains?

    Babies born at the height of the pandemic appear to suffer small but significant delays in their motor and social development, a new study reports.

    Babies were particularly at risk if their mothers were in the first trimester of their pregnancy during spring 2020, when the United States entered lockdowns.

    "It's important to recognize these are very slight differences. There weren't ...

    Real-World Data Confirms Pfizer Vaccine Safe for Kids Ages 5-11

    New U.S. data based on nearly 9 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine delivered to kids ages 5 to 11 shows no major safety issues, according to researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The vaccine was first authorized for use in th...

    Parents Underestimate How Much Time Teens Spent Online During Pandemic

    Parents, think you have a good handle on how much time your teens are spending on social media?

    Don't bet on it. New research suggests your best guesstimate is likely way off.

    Parents significantly underestimated their teens' social media use -- especially girls' -- during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the study showed.

    "Although most parents and their teens spent...

    Program Aims to Get Lifesaving Drugs to Kids With Cancer in Poorer Countries

    A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launch the Global Platform for Access to Childhood C...

    No Health Issues for Babies Born to Women Who Had COVID in Pregnancy

    Moms who had COVID-19 in pregnancy can breathe easier thanks to a small, new study that found no growth or development problems in 6-month-old babies whose mothers had the virus while expecting.

    “Our results should be reassuring to pregnant women with COVID-19 who are worried about how the virus might affect the baby,” said study co-author Dr. Malika Shah, a neonatologist at the Child...

    Most IVF Babies Grow Up to Be Mentally Healthy Adults, Study Shows

    There is no increased risk of mental health problems in teens and young adults who were conceived through in-vitro fertilization (IVF), Swedish researchers report.

    Although those born after assisted reproductive techniques did have a slightly higher risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), it owed to parental background factors, they said.

    Since 1978, more than 9 million childre...

    Many Overweight Kids Already Have Hardened Arteries, Diabetes

    If your children struggle with their weight, new research suggests they may also suffer from diseases once seen only in adults.

    Stiffening of the arteries, which can lead to early heart attacks and strokes, and type 2 diabetes were found in many of the more than 600 obese children, adolescents and young adults studied. And the problem is only getting worse: According to the U.S. Centers f...

    Why Are More Women Using Pot, Other Cannabis Products During Pregnancy?

    A growing number of pregnant women are using marijuana or other cannabis products, and a new study suggests that relief of symptoms such as morning sickness may be a primary reason.

    In recent years, studies have documented a rise in cannabis use during pregnanc...

    Biden Administration to Tackle Lead in Drinking Water

    In an effort to further lower lead levels in drinking water, the Biden administration on Thursday announced $2.9 billion in infrastructure bill funds for lead pipe removal and tighter lead limits.

    The new, tougher limits to be imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are expected to be finalized by 2024 and would require the replacement of remaining lead drinking water pipes a...

    T-Shirt Study Shows Importance of Mom's Smell to Bond With Baby

    The sound of mom's voice can soothe a fussy baby like nothing else, but now new research suggests that an infant is also calmed by the scent of its mother.

    Prior animal studies had already shown that olfaction -- smell -- "is very important, that mother's smell is very critical for attachment," noted study author Ruth Feldman. "Young recognize mother by her smell, and mother and habitat a...

    'Baby Talk' Is Really Helping Baby Learn

    You may feel silly doing it, but baby talk helps your infant learn the basics of human language, a new study suggests.

    By mimicking the sound of a smaller vocal tract, baby talk guides babies on how words should sound coming out of their own mouths, the researchers explained.

    "It seems t...

    Another Benefit to Asthma Control for Kids: Less Bullying

    Kids can be cruel, and bullies often zero in on kids they view as weak or different, including those with asthma.

    One in 10 children with asthma say they have been bullied or teased as a result of their condition, but tight asthma control seems to keep bullying at bay, a new study suggests....

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