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Results for search "Prescription Drugs".

03 Feb

Antidepressants Are Often Prescribed for Chronic Pain, But Do They Work?

A new study finds while some antidepressants help certain pain conditions, others are either ineffective or the evidence is inconclusive.

Health News Results - 474

Maker of Diet Drug Wegovy Ramps Up Production to Meet Demand

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2023 (HealthDay News) – The wildly popular weight-loss drug Wegovy has become hard to find, but that could soon change.

Novo Nordisk, which makes the medication, said Wednesday that it has increased production to meet demand.

“We know for a fact that patients have been lined up,” CEO

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 2, 2023
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  • Ozempic: Dieters Who Use Scarce Diabetes Drug Could Face Side Effects

    Mila Clarke started taking Ozempic in 2020 to help manage her diabetes, but was pleasantly surprised to find herself soon shedding pounds.

    “I was like, this is really weird because I’m not having to try very hard to do this,” said Clarke, who has been diagnosed with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and chronicles her diabetes journey on her

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 1, 2023
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  • Medicare Will Save U.S. Billions Negotiating Drug Prices

    The U.S. government could save billions every year once Medicare begins negotiating drug prices in 2026, new research suggests.

    The Inflation Reduction Act passed by Congress last year allows Medicare to bargain with drug companies on the prices of 10 of the highest-priced drugs in 2026 before ...

    Nearly 1 in 5 American Adults Takes Sleep Meds

    Nearly 20% of American adults use a drug to help them sleep, either occasionally or regularly, health officials reported Wednesday.

    Sleep medications, sold both over-the-counter and by prescription, are a common treatment for sleep problems, said senior report author Lindsey Black

    In States Where Recreational Marijuana Legalized, Less Demand for Prescription Codeine

    New research suggests that there's one potential way to reduce demand for prescription codeine: legalizing recreational cannabis.

    Exactly what brought scientists to that conclusion? States that legalized cannabis use saw a significant reduction in pharmacy-based distribution of codeine, an opioid with a high potential for misuse.

    “A reduction in the misuse of opioids can save live...

    Is There a Best Diuretic Drug for Heart Failure?

    It doesn’t matter which water pill you’re prescribed to treat your heart failure, because new trial data shows that one works as well as the other.

    Two diuretics widely used to treat heart failure, furosemide and torsemide, showed no difference in their ability to improve patient survival, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored trial.

    “We’re not ...

    Less Than a Third of Heavily Advertised Drugs Have 'High Therapeutic Value': Study

    Television ads for drugs are filled with glowing images of people living their best lives, all thanks to that new med they’ve been prescribed.

    But drugs being touted on TV often have little to no benefit compared to other treatments, a new study published online Jan. 13 in JA...

    Herbal Remedies & You: 6 Tips to Safeguard Your Health

    Not all prescription drugs and dietary herbal supplements work well together.

    It’s important to be aware of possible drug/supplement interactions that could be harmful, according to the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), a part of the National Institutes of Health.

    Th...

    Black, Hispanic People With Epilepsy Often Miss Out on Latest Meds

    American adults who have epilepsy and are Black or Hispanic are less likely than white adults to be prescribed the latest medications, according to new research.

    “While finding the right medication is often a trial-and-error process that is based on the individual, studies have shown that use of newer medications improves outcomes, and some newer medications have fewer side effects,” ...

    In Study, Reminder Letters Helped Doctors Make Safer Choices Prescribing Opioids

    Could a simple letter prompt doctors to prescribe opioids more safely?

    Yes, claims new research that found reminding doctors to check a prescription database before doling out opioids increased their engagement with the program, having the potential to create more informed prescribing.

    The study enrolled clinicians in Minnesota who prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines or gabapent...

    Leading Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Aggressive Treatment of Childhood Obesity

    A leading pediatricians' group has issued new guidelines on treating obesity in children and teens that, for the first time, call for early, aggressive intervention that can include weight-loss drugs and surgery.

    “There is no evidence that ‘watchful waiting’ or delayed treatment is appropriate for children with obesity,” Dr.

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 9, 2023
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  • Letting Doctors Know a Patient Has Overdosed Might Curb Opioid Overprescribing

    One low-cost intervention could make a difference in America's epidemic of opioid overdoses, a new study suggests.

    When health care providers were notified that one of their patients had died from an overdose, they wrote fewer opioid prescriptions for up to a year later.

    The University of Southern California (USC) study built upon earlier findings that letters like these could reduc...

    New COVID Pill May Be Improvement Over Paxlovid, Chinese Trial Suggests

    COVID-19 patients could soon have a new antiviral pill they can take to guard against severe disease.

    The treatment, called VV116, worked as well as Paxlovid in people who were at high risk of severe disease in a phase 3 trial in China.

    The trial was a “great success,” study co-author Ren Zhao, a professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, said in a

    Avoiding Opioids, Many Patients in Pain Get Gabapentin Instead. Does It Work?

    As doctors have tried to steer their chronic pain patients away from highly addictive opioids, many have turned to two antiseizure drugs, but a new review finds they are only "modestly effective" at treating pain.

    Gabapentin and pregabalin are being prescribed to manage all types of pain, but clinical trial data shows that the drugs have limited effectiveness, said lead researcher

    Doctors & Their Families Less Likely to Follow Medical Guidelines Than Others

    Doctors are notorious for criticizing patients who don't take medications as prescribed.

    But physicians and their families are themselves less likely than everyone else to comply with medication guidelines, a new, large-scale study has found.

    People tend to adhere to medication guidelines about 54% of the time, while doctors and their families lag about 4 percentage points behind th...

    What's Driving the Ongoing Adderall Shortage -- and What Parents Can Do

    Shortages of the ADHD drug Adderall are expected to continue for months, forcing families to scramble for ways to deal with their children's attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    The shortage has caused headaches and hassles for parents like San Diego mom Jackie Meader, who has been "flustered, rushed and out of sorts" since her 16-year-old son's prescription ran out about a mo...

    California's Flavored Tobacco Ban Won't Be Blocked by Supreme Court

    An attempt to block California's flavored tobacco ban was stopped Monday when the Supreme Court declined to hear the case.

    That now means the ban will go into effect on Dec. 21.

    The ban includes everything from candy flavors to menthol in a wide range of tobacco products including vape ...

    Paxlovid Soon Won't Be Free for Americans

    The antiviral Paxlovid has kept people from getting really sick and dying from COVID-19 since it became available -- at no cost to them.

    But by the middle of next year, the U.S. government will stop subsidizing the medication. Instead, it will be billed for like many other medications.

    While the Biden administration has paid about $530 for each course of the medication by buying 2...

    Drug Choice Might Matter for Patients With Macular Degeneration

    One of the two most common drugs used to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) appears better than the other, a new, small study suggests.

    Among 106 patients with "wet" age-related macular degeneration, 50% of those treated with aflibercept (Eylea) could be weaned off the drug after one year, compared with only 17% of those treated with bevacizumab (Avastin), researchers found.

    Dangerous Myths Keep Many Adults With Food Allergies From Getting an EpiPen

    The EpiPen is a known lifesaver when someone with a serious food allergy eats something they can't tolerate.

    Yet the auto-injection treatment is greatly underused in the United States, according to a new survey.

    Just over half of at-risk adults said they had ever been prescribed the device, researchers found. And more than one-third of severe allergy sufferers mistakenly believe th...

    Raise Med Dosages in Weeks After Heart Failure Crisis for Better Outcome: Study

    When people with heart failure wind up in the hospital, it tends to become a slippery slope: They are more likely to be readmitted or die within six months during this vulnerable period.

    Now, new research shows that ramping up doses of three heart failure medications within two weeks of hospital discharge along with more frequent follow-up visits cuts the risk of both hospital readmission...

    New Drug Helps Tame Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure

    Some patients with high blood pressure can't get it under control with standard medications, but a new study shows an experimental drug is up to the task of treating these tough-to-treat cases.

    Why do some folks struggle more with managing their high blood pressure than others? When the hypertension i...

    Study Compares 2 Common Diuretics Used in Heart Failure

    Patients with heart failure are often prescribed a diuretic or "water pill" to prevent fluid buildup. A new study has found that two often-prescribed medications work equally well at reducing deaths.

    "Given that the two different therapies provide the same effect on outcomes, we shouldn't spend time switching patients from one to the other, and instead concentrate on giving the right dos...

    Paxlovid Lowers Risk of Long COVID

    The antiviral pill Paxlovid not only reduces hospitalization and death after catching COVID-19: New research shows it also cuts the chances of long COVID by roughly 25%.

    The drug, which combines a newer antiviral called nirmatrelvir with an older medication known as ritonavir, del...

    Common Blood Pressure Drug Might Prevent Alzheimer's in Black Patients

    A new study has shown the blood pressure drug telmisartan may offer new hope as an Alzheimer's treatment in Black patients. It did not show the same benefit in white people.

    Learning how people from different ethnic groups respond to the same drug could be key in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. Even though Black people are more likely than white folks to develop th...

    CVS, Walgreens Announce $10 Billion Opioid Settlements

    Years of litigation over the opioid epidemic could end soon, as the national pharmacy chains CVS and Walgreens announced Wednesday that each company has agreed to a nearly $5 billion settlement.

    While neither of the companies admitted wrongdoing, the settlements are part of the fight over the drug industry's role in the epidemic that has led to 500,000 U.S. deaths in the past 20 years, t...

    Topical Cream May Restore Skin Pigmentation in People With Vitiligo

    For the millions of people who live with vitiligo, a disease that robs the skin of its natural color, a newly approved cream called ruxolitinib (Opzelura) is quickly becoming a game changer.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 24, 2022
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  • Study Debunks Use of Antidepressant Luvox as COVID Treatment

    A study testing drugs that are used for other conditions for their potential in treating COVID-19 has found that the antidepressant fluvoxamine (brand name Luvox) offered no benefit, at least at an initial smaller dose.

    Study participants took 50 mg of the medication twice daily for 10 days, hoping to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 symptoms. A control group took a placebo.

    “There...

    FDA Says ADHD Med Adderall Is in Short Supply

    People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or narcolepsy may rely on the drug Adderall, but it is in short supply, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

    The Adderall and Adderall IR shortage is due to intermittent man...

    Knee, Shoulder Surgeries Without Opioids? It's Possible, Study Finds

    While politicians and health officials seek solutions to an opioid epidemic that kills tens of thousands every year, doctors who prescribe the pain medications are seeking alternatives for their patients.

    Minority Patients Less Likely to Get Newer Alzheimer's Meds

    While certain minority groups are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia than their white counterparts, they may also be less likely to be eligible for new disease-slowing treatments, a new study finds.

    Cognitive, or mental, impairment in Black, Hispanic and Asian patients is more likely to be caused by forms of dementia unrelated to the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 4, 2022
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  • Two Cases Show COVID Virus Mutating Around Standard Treatment Remdesivir

    Patients with weakened immune systems could be inadvertently helping COVID-19 develop resistance to the antiviral drug remdesivir, a new study reports.

    After lengthy COVID infections, two kidney transplant patients on immune-suppressing drugs to prevent organ rejection developed a mutated version of SARS-CoV-2 resistant to remdesivir, according to

  • By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 28, 2022
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  • Already Taking a Blood Thinner? Adding Aspirin May Do Harm

    For many years, doctors have advised taking low-dose aspirin to help prevent first-time heart attacks and stroke. But increasingly, they're doing an about-face.

    The latest warnings come from University of Michigan researchers who reported that patients simultaneously taking another blood thinner,

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 21, 2022
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  • 'Life Changing': New Drug Eases Severe Eczema in Young Kids

    Sonia Dhaliwal knows exactly how bad childhood eczema can get.

    That's because her young daughter, Ariah Khan, has struggled with a severe case of the skin condition ever since she was a baby.

    Ariah's symptoms were relentless and debilitating until the age of 3. They included rashes; skin discoloration...

    Dogs Have Died After Licking a Common Chemotherapy Cream, FDA Warns

    Your dog may like to lick your hand or face, but if you're using a chemotherapy cream that treats certain skin conditions, you should not allow it, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advises.

    The medication fluorouracil is fatal to dogs when ingested. People who keep the cream on a nightstand or counter sh...

    Is There a Best Time of Day to Take Your Blood Pressure Pill?

    It doesn't seem to matter what time of day or night you take your blood pressure medication, a new study finds.

    The results of a randomized trial of more than 21,000 patients with high blood pressure who were follo...

    All-in-One 'Polypill' Gets Heart Patients Taking Their Meds

    In a finding that proves convenience is key when it comes to sticking to a medication regimen, new research shows that combining three heart drugs into one "polypill" slashes the risk of dying from a second heart attack by 33%.

    "The results of the SECURE study show that for the first time that the polypill, wh...

    ADHD Drug Adderall in Short Supply

    Labor shortages at Teva Pharmaceuticals have made Adderall, a widely used attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug, hard to find in some drugstores.

    But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration noted that there's no overall shortage of

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 29, 2022
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  • America's Love Affair With Sleeping Pills May Be Waning

    Fewer Americans are turning to sleep medications to fight insomnia.

    After a dramatic rise in prescriptions for drugs like Ambien, the trend has ebbed, according to a new study, and fewer doctors are prescribing sleep medications

    Many Who Need Opioid OD Antidote the Most Can't Afford It

    Naloxone is a lifesaving antidote to an opioid overdose, but it may be priced too high for those most vulnerable to opioid-related death, a new study finds.

    Between 2014 and 2018, naloxone costs rose 500% for those without insurance, while out-of-pocket costs for the medication dropped 26% for people with i...

    Ivermectin, Luvox Fail as COVID-19 Treatment

    Two drugs touted as potential COVID-19 treatments, ivermectin and fluvoxamine, don't do a thing to improve patients' oxygen levels and keep them out of the hospital or the morgue, a new clinical trial has shown.

    Neither of the two repurposed drugs proved effective against COVID among overweight or obese patients who received them within seven days of symptom onset, according to results pu...

    Here's How the Inflation Reduction Act Will Lower the Cost of Health Care

    President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed the Inflation Reduction Act into law, making it the most significant health care legislation enacted in more than a decade.

    How will it affect health care?

    Millions of Americans covered by Medicare will see big reductions in costs for both health care and...

    Here's How New Federal Legislation Might Cut Your Drug Costs

    The Inflation Reduction Act is expected to bring out-of-pocket drug costs down for many U.S. seniors, but most of its benefits aren't immediate.

    Under the law, Medicare will now be allowed to negotiate the cost of some drugs. That should eventually bring down out-of-pocket costs for seniors with Medicare Part D prescription drug plans, according to John Clark, a clinical associate profess...

    B 8/11 -- U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Are Declining

    The United States has an opioid epidemic, but there's one bright spot in the fight against it: Prescriptions for these addictive drugs have declined for patients with private insurance.

    Amid guidelines over the past decade from governments, health systems and insurers aimed at reducing opioid prescriptions, previous studies have pointed to a nationwide drop in prescribing rates.

    <...

    Tough to Get Your Kid to Take Medicine? An Expert Offers Tips

    Sometimes it's difficult for parents to get their child to take necessary medication.

    One expert who spends part of her workday guiding parents through this challenge offers some suggestions to make the ordeal easier.

    Emily Glarum, a child life specialist at the Heart Institute at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, offers these tips: Be honest, practice it, provide choices, set a sch...

    Don't Use Luvox, Colchicine to Fight COVID, WHO Experts Say

    People shouldn't take the drugs colchicine and fluvoxamine to treat mild to moderate COVID-19, the World Health Organization (WHO) is warning.

    The antidepressant drug fluvoxamine (Luvox) and the gout drug colchicine are commonly ...

    'Stepped' Approach to Treating Diabetic Eye Disease May Be Best

    An off-brand medication for diabetic macular edema might prove just as effective in early treatment as its more expensive alternative, potentially saving patients thousands of dollars, new research suggests.

    The vision condition is a common complication of poorly controlled diabetes, which can damage bl...

    Cancer Med Might Be Powerful Treatment for MS

    A drug used "off-label" for multiple sclerosis (MS) is more effective than a standard medication at preventing symptom flare-ups, a new clinical trial has found.

    The drug, called rit...

    FDA Mulling Over-the-Counter Sale of Contraceptive Pill

    For decades, birth control pills in the United States have only been available with a prescription, but an application filed Monday with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an over-the-counter pill might change all that.

    The lates...

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