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Results for search "Diabetes: Drugs".

09 Dec

The Underground Exchange of Diabetes Medications

Drug costs and lack of access are forcing more people to use underground drug exchanges.

Health News Results - 27

Price Hikes Have Patients Turning to Craigslist for Insulin, Asthma Inhalers

Maybe you've gone to Craigslist to find a used car or a secondhand couch, but imagine having to turn to the internet to pay for lifesaving drugs.

It's already happening: A new study found that hundreds of ads were placed on Craigslist for insulin and asthma inhalers during a 12-day period in June 2019.

"This study shines a light on how deeply some patients are struggling to...

Drug Duo Speeds Regeneration of Key Cells Lost in Diabetes

A novel combination of two drugs appeared to spur faster regeneration of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, a preliminary study in mice and human tissue found.

Beta cells are crucial to making insulin, a hormone that's deficient in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

The new drug combo pairs an already approved class of type 2 diabetes medications called GLP-...

Medicare Could Save Billions If Allowed to Negotiate Insulin Prices

If you don't need insulin, you probably haven't paid much attention to its skyrocketing cost, but new research shows that exorbitant drug pricing eventually affects everyone.

The study found that in 2017, Medicare spent nearly $8 billion on insulin. The researchers said that if Medicare were allowed to negotiate drug prices like the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) can, Medic...

Big Advances Made Against Diabetes in 2019

A new artificial pancreas system, drugs that help control blood sugar and protect the heart and the kidneys, a new medication that delays type 1 diabetes, and a new way to track blood sugar throughout the day -- 2019 was a pretty big year in diabetes care.

"This has been a good year for patients who have diabetes. There have been a lot of changes and...

FDA Testing Levels of Carcinogen in Diabetes Drug Metformin

Levels of possible cancer-causing chemicals in metformin diabetes medications are under investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Metformin is a prescription drug used to control high blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Over the past year and a half, several types of drugs -- including angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) used for high blood pressu...

Could a Pill Replace Insulin Shots?

Many people with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin at least once a day, but new animal research suggests a pill may one day do the trick.

This experimental pill can withstand the trip through the gastrointestinal tract, scientists report. When it gets to the small intestine, it breaks down into dissolving microneedles that attach to the intestinal wall and release the dr...

Older Diabetics May Be Getting Too Much Insulin

Are elderly people with diabetes being overtreated?

A new study suggests that's so: Older, sicker patients tend to be the ones most likely to still be using insulin to manage their blood sugar, despite guidelines that suggest it's often safer to lower diabetes treatment intensity with age.

The study found that nearly 20% of people with type 2 diabetes older than 75 were...

FDA OKs New Pill for Type 2 Diabetes

A new pill to lower blood sugar for people with type 2 diabetes was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday.

The drug, Rybelsus (semaglutide) is the first pill in a class of drugs called glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) approved for use in the United States. Before Rybelsus, the drug had to be injected.

"Before this approval, patients did not have an oral GL...

Keeping Blood Sugar Steady Helps You Live Longer With Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, keeping your blood sugar levels stable over time may be key to living longer.

New research finds that people who have more swings in their blood sugar levels were more than twice as likely to die early, compared to folks with more stable blood sugar management.

The study authors used a test called hemoglobin A1C to measure blood sugar. This com...

Drug May Help Delay Onset of Type 1 Diabetes

A two-year delay in the onset of type 1 diabetes could make a big difference for people with the disease. And researchers say a new drug may make that postponement possible.

Researchers gave the drug teplizumab or a placebo to a small group of people who were nearly certain to develop type 1 diabetes, based on genetics and certain symptoms. Those given a placebo, or dummy drug, progre...

Newer Diabetes Drugs Linked to 'Flesh-Eating' Genital Infection

Say you have type 2 diabetes and you are taking a newer class of medications to treat your disease -- but one day you notice pain, redness and a foul odor in your genital area.

If this happens, new research suggests you need to see your doctor immediately, because you may be suffering from Fournier gangrene. Also known as a "flesh-eating" disease, this infection attacks your genital ...

Newer Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Kids, Teens

A type 2 diabetes drug for adults also controls blood sugar levels in children and teens with the disease, researchers report.

Type 2 diabetes is on the rise among children and teens, but they have fewer treatment choices than adults, the study authors said. Currently, the only drugs approved for treatment of children and teens with type 2 diabetes are metformin and insulin.

Could Diabetes Drug Metformin Help Keep People Slim?

New research suggests a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes -- metformin -- may help people with pre-diabetes maintain long-term weight loss.

People who lost weight while taking metformin maintained a loss of about 6% of their body weight for six to 15 years. People who lost weight through lifestyle changes -- eating healthily and exercising regularly -- managed to keep ...

Common Diabetes Drug May Also Shield Kidneys, Heart

A common diabetes drug may also greatly reduce the odds for death from kidney failure and heart disease in diabetes patients with kidney disease, a new study finds.

The news on Invokana (canagliflozin) is important, experts say, because diabetes and kidney trouble so often go together.

"Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure worldwide, but for almost two decades the...

Experimental Drug Could Be New Option for Type 2 Diabetes

An experimental drug may help people with type 2 diabetes curb their blood sugar without causing it to drop to dangerously low levels.

Researchers found that the compound -- dubbed TTP399 for now -- improved patients' blood sugar control when it was added to the standard medication metformin for six months.

And it did so without causing hypoglycemia -- blood sugar drops that...

Common Heart, Diabetes Meds May Help Ease Mental Illness

A new study is raising the question of whether certain cholesterol, blood pressure and diabetes drugs could help manage mental illnesses like schizophrenia.

The findings come from a study of over 142,000 Swedish patients with serious mental illnesses -- including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The researchers found that those patients typically fared better during periods when th...

Study Eases Concern That Common Diabetes Med Might Harm Bones

If you have type 2 diabetes and you're taking canagliflozin to help control your blood sugar, a new study has some good news for you: The drug doesn't appear to raise the risk of bone fractures.

Previously, research had suggested this might be the case.

"We were interested in doing this study because there was one randomized trial that said there was an increased risk of b...

Do Your Gut Bacteria Affect Your Diabetes Meds?

The bacteria living in your digestive system might determine how your body processes diabetes medications, a new review suggests.

Researchers combed through more than 100 published studies conducted in people or in rodents to see how the gut microbiome -- bacteria living in the digestive system -- could impair or enhance the way diabetes drugs work.

"You can have two people...

Some Diabetes Drugs Linked to Higher Heart Risks

Two common classes of type 2 diabetes drugs may lower blood sugar levels, but new research suggests those same drugs might boost the risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

The drug classes in question are sulfonylureas and basal insulin. Sulfonylureas cause the body to release more insulin. They're taken orally and have been used since the 1950s. Basal insulin is given as an ...

Scientists Get Closer to Generating Cells Lost to  Diabetes

People with diabetes often don't have enough insulin-producing beta cells to control their blood sugar, but a combination of two novel drugs may coax the body into making more of these vital cells, an early study finds.

Together, the drugs caused beta cells to reproduce at a rate of about 5 percent to 8 percent a day, according to the researchers. Work has only been done in the lab a...

Doctor Not Available for Diabetes Care? Nurse Practitioners Do Just as Well

There are many areas of the United States where doctors are in short supply, but the good news for diabetics is that nurse practitioners and physician assistants can often help fill that care gap.

In fact, new research compared the care given by doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants to people with diabetes and found no significant differences in care.

"There ...

Certain Diabetes Meds Tied to Higher Odds for Amputation

A specific class of diabetes medication appears to double the risk of losing a leg or foot to amputation, a new study reports.

People on sodium-glucose cotransporter2 (SGLT2) inhibitors were twice as likely to require a lower limb amputation as people taking another type of diabetes medication, Scandinavian researchers found.

Patients also had a doubled risk of diabetic keto...

Type 1 Diabetes Often Misdiagnosed in Adults

It's not always easy -- even for doctors -- to tell if someone has type 1 or type 2 diabetes when they're diagnosed as an adult.

And a new study finds mistakes are common.

That's what happened to British Prime Minister Theresa May when she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2012. She was in her 50s at the time. Despite having all of the symptoms common to type 1 diabetes...

Access to Diabetes Drugs Improved Under Affordable Care Act: Study

People with diabetes face a host of expenses related to their disease, but some relief may now be available in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility as part of the Affordable Care Act.

A new study reports that the number of prescriptions filled rose by up to 40 percent for insulin and other diabetes medications in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility in 2014 and 2015.

...

Adding or Switching Diabetes Drugs Can Put Patients at Risk: Study

Using sulfonylurea drugs with or instead of metformin to control blood sugar increases type 2 diabetics' risk of serious complications, a new study finds.

Metformin is a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes, meaning it is the first drug that will be tried. But sulfonylureas are the most often-used second-line treatment, commonly along with metformin.

But little is known ...

Artificial Pancreas Helps Hospitalized Type 2 Diabetics

Using an artificial pancreas can help hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes maintain good blood sugar control, a new study suggests.

That's important because when diabetes isn't managed well, high blood sugar levels can lengthen hospital stays and increase the risk of complications and even death, the researchers said.

The artificial pancreas -- an automated insulin pum...

Will the Future Be Needle-Free for Diabetics?

For many diabetics, one of the most dreaded aspects of managing their condition is the need to inject insulin multiple times a day. But Harvard researchers have discovered a way to deliver insulin in a pill, and it appears to work well -- at least in rats.

A lot of questions remain: What is the proper dose compared to injected insulin? Will it be delivered uniformly? And, the biggest...

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