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Results for search "Men's Problems: Misc.".

Health News Results - 146

AHA News: Race and Gender May Tip the Scales on Traditional Stroke Risk Factors

Traditional stroke risk factors, such as high blood pressure, smoking and diabetes, impact people of various races and genders differently, new research shows.

"The biggest thing we found was that hypertension has a bigger effect on stroke among African American men than it does on (white people) or African American women, even in young adulthood," said lead investigator Elizabeth Ar...

Cholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate Cancers

Drugs that many men with prostate cancer might already be taking -- cholesterol-lowering statins -- may help extend their survival if they have a "high-risk" form of the disease, new research suggests.

High-risk patients include men with high blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and a "Gleason score" of 8 or more. Gleason scores are a calculation used to gauge prognosis in...

'Tough Guys' May Be at Especially High Risk for Suicide

Young men who believe that "real men don't cry" may be more prone to suicide, a new study suggests.

It has long been known that men are more likely than women to end their own lives: In the United States, the suicide death rate among men is about 3.5 times that of women, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The statistics raise the question of wh...

Could ED Drugs Threaten Men's Vision?

Viagra can salvage a man's sex life, but in rare cases it may temporarily steal his sight.

Researchers report that some men who took sildenafil -- the generic form of the impotence drug -- suffered from vision problems, including a kind of color blindness that could take weeks to resolve.

The case report details 17 Turkish males who wound up in the hospital after taking sil...

With Equal Access to Care, Blacks, Whites Have Similar Prostate Cancer Outcomes

Survival rates are similar for black and white prostate cancer patients who are treated in an equal-access health system, researchers say.

In the general U.S. population, black men are more likely than white men to be diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer, and more than twice as likely to die from the disease.

In a new study, researchers assessed whether this racial dispar...

Allow Dead Men to Be Sperm Donors, Medical Ethicists Say

Should a dying man be allowed to let doctors harvest his sperm for possible use by strangers after death? Yes, say two medical ethicists in the United Kingdom.

Writing in an article published Jan. 20 in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Drs. Nathan Hodson and Joshua Parker said that such donations would be akin to the organ donor process.

"If it is morally acceptable th...

Eating More Veggies Won't Stop Prostate Cancer: Study

Eating a diet high in vegetables and fruits does not slow or cure prostate cancer, according to a new study.

U.S. guidelines say prostate cancer patients might benefit from eating a vegetable-rich diet.

This study included 478 men, ages 50 to 80. All had been diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer and were under active surveillance, meaning they were closely monitored an...

Fish Oil Supplements Might Help Men Become Dads

Couples struggling to get pregnant might want to add a little more fish in their diet, a new study says.

Young men who take fish oil supplements appear to have better sperm quality and higher testosterone levels than those who don't, as well as larger testicles, researchers report.

Although it wasn't tested as part of the study, all these male reproductive factors should lea...

What Works Best to Help Men With Overactive Bladder?

Learning how to control the urge to urinate may be all the therapy men need to treat an overactive bladder, a new study suggests.

A combination of drugs and behavioral therapy seems to work better than drugs alone, but behavioral therapy alone also worked better than drugs, the researchers found.

The trial of 204 men with overactive bladder suggests behavioral therapy may b...

'Less Is More' When it Comes to Testicular Cancer Chemo, Study Suggests

Treatment with half the typical amount of chemotherapy can still prevent the return of one type of testicular cancer, a new study suggests.

Giving patients with the "non-seminoma" form of testicular tumor just one cycle of chemotherapy was just as effective at preventing the cancer from coming back as the standard two cycles, the study found.

Cutting the amount of chemother...

Male Fertility Supplements Fail to Deliver

Supplements containing zinc and folic acid don't appear to boost male fertility, a new study finds.

Despite marketing claims, these supplements don't improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts or sperm function, researchers say.

"Our results suggest that these dietary supplements have little to no effect on fertility and may even cause mild gastrointestinal symptoms," researche...

Testosterone Supplements Won't Help Most Men, Doctors' Group Says

Testosterone therapy is no fountain of youth for older men, though it might help some who are impotent.

That's according to new guidelines from the American College of Physicians -- the first from the group to address the issue of treating age-related "low T."

It's known that men's testosterone levels decline with age. And for years industry has p...

Male Researchers More Apt Than Women to Hype Findings: Study

Male researchers are far more likely than female colleagues to claim that their findings are especially important, a new study says.

The language used to describe discoveries can affect how much attention researchers get and also affect their career advancement. These findings may help explain why women in medicine and science tend to get paid less and have fewer career opportunities,...

Muscle in Middle Age Might Help Men's Hearts Later

Middle-aged men who maintain their muscle mass may lower their risk of heart disease as they get older, a new study suggests.

Beginning in the mid-30s, muscle begins to decline by about 3% each decade. Previous studies found that muscle mass is associated with heart attack/stroke risk, but those studies focused on people with heart disease.

In this new study, the researc...

Testosterone Supplements Double Men's Odds for Blood Clots: Study

Testosterone therapy appears to double a man's risk of suffering a potentially life-threatening blood clot, a new study warns.

Men had twice the risk for a deep vein blood clot if they'd been receiving testosterone during the previous six months, researchers reported in the Nov. 11 online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine.

The increased risk occurred whether or not a ...

Veteran Who Received Penis Transplant Is Doing Well One Year Later

A U.S. veteran who received a total penis and scrotum transplant last year is faring better than anyone expected, his doctors say.

In March 2018, the soldier -- who was severely wounded after stepping on a bomb in Afghanistan -- underwent the world's first total penis and scrotum transplant. A team of 11 surgeons at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore performed the 14-hour procedure...

Chlamydia Can Harm Male Fertility

Undiagnosed chlamydia infection can harm male fertility, a new study suggests.

"Chlamydia infection has been associated with women's infertility but much less is known about its impact on male infertility, particularly if men do not experience symptoms, which is estimated to be in about 50% of cases," said study leader Ken Beagley, a professor of immunology at Queensland Universit...

Beyonce's Dad Puts Spotlight on Male Breast Cancer

Beyonce Knowles' father first suspected something was wrong when he noticed a dot of blood that kept appearing on his shirts and bedsheets.

"Imagine a piece of white paper and you took a red pen and just put a dot," Mathew Knowles told the New York Times. "That's what it looked like in my T-shirt."

Knowles scheduled a mammogram in July after he squeezed a nipple and a...

Using Opioids After Vasectomy May Trigger Persistent Use: Study

Taking opioids after a vasectomy doesn't improve pain control and is associated with increased risk of persistent use of the addictive painkillers months later, a new study says.

It included 228 men who had vasectomies performed by eight different urologists. Two of the urologists routinely prescribed opioids for pain after the surgery. The other six used other methods to control pain...

Tying the Knot Is Tied to Longer Life Span, New Data Shows

Married folks not only live longer than singles, but the longevity gap between the two groups is growing, U.S. government health statisticians report.

The age-adjusted death rate for the married declined by 7% between 2010 and 2017, according to a new study from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

AHA News: Entertainment Exec Mathew Knowles: I Have Breast Cancer

Entertainment executive Mathew Knowles has fought off breast cancer via a mastectomy and is planning another because testing uncovered a genetic mutation with potentially life-altering ramifications for himself and his family.

Knowles said the cancer appeared in July, leading to the discovery of a mutation in one of the so-called "breast cancer genes," specifically BRCA2.

...

Radiation Right After Surgery Might Not Help Prostate Cancer Patients

In the largest investigation of its kind, researchers conclude that subjecting prostate cancer patients to radiation therapy immediately after surgery doesn't give them an advantage in staying cancer-free.

The finding stems from a review of four studies that together tracked outcomes for more than 3,500 prostate cancer patients from multiple countries.

If the findings help c...

Link Seen Between Infertility, Prostate Cancer

Could male infertility contribute to a higher risk for prostate cancer?

Yes, according to new Swedish research that suggests that men who become fathers through assisted reproduction treatments may be more likely to develop prostate cancer in midlife.

The conclusion follows a review of data collected by a Swedish national registry between 1994 and 2014. In all, 1 million chi...

Doubt Over Long-Term Use of Hormone Rx for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Running contrary to current guidelines, new research suggests that use of hormone-suppressing treatment over the long term may not help some men battling recurrent prostate cancer, and may even cause harm.

In fact, the study found that long-term hormone therapy was tied to a raised risk of death from other causes for some patients who received it.

Blood levels of prostate-sp...

At-Risk Men May Also Benefit From Regular Mammograms

Mammography has saved hundreds of thousands of lives by detecting breast cancer early in women.

Could such regular X-ray screening also help men?

A new study argues there's potential benefit in regular mammograms for men who are at high risk of breast cancer.

Mammography accurately detected dozens of cases of breast cancer in nearly 1,900 men screened during a 12-year pe...

Adult Support Can Make the Difference for Boys From Tough Neighborhoods

Strong adult social support can help prevent violence among teen boys growing up in poor neighborhoods, new research shows.

The study included nearly 900 boys in poor areas of Pittsburgh, aged 13 to 19, who took part in a sexual violence prevention trial.

The researchers looked at 40 risk behaviors in categories such as youth violence, bullying, sexual and/or dating violen...

What Is Your Risk for Prostate Cancer?

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men, so it's important to know the risk factors and warning signs, an expert says.

The American Cancer Society estimates there will be nearly 175,000 new prostate cancer cases in the United States this year and over 31,000 deaths. One in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.

"The diseas...

For Men, Living Alone May Mean Poorer Control of Blood-Thinning Meds

Men who are on the blood-thinning drug warfarin have more difficulty taking the medication if they live alone, but the same is not true for women, a new study finds.

Warfarin (brand-name Coumadin) is a common anti-clotting treatment to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation, the most common type of heart rhythm disorder.

Continuous bloo...

Who Multitasks Better: Men or Women? The Answer May Surprise You

Multitasking is equally taxing for women and men, according to a study that challenges the popular notion that women are better at it.

For the study, 48 women and 48 men were asked to do letter or number identification tasks. In some tests, they had to pay attention to two tasks at once (concurrent multitasking). In others, they had to switch attention from one task to another (sequen...

Overweight Men May Feel Stigmatized, Too

It's not only women who agonize over their excess pounds. Stigma about being overweight can cause physical and emotional harm to men, too.

"It's often assumed that conversations about weight loss, poor body image, and dieting are more salient for women. Men are frequently overlooked, but that does not necessarily mean that men are less affected by weight stigma or less likely to inter...

It's Not Just College Kids: Many Seniors Are Binge Drinking, Too

Binge drinking is often associated with young adults, but according to a new study, more than 10% of people over 65 do it, too.

Among seniors, binges are most common in men and those who use cannabis, researchers found. Experts said the trend is troubling, because older people should actually be cutting back on alcohol.

"Many organizations, such as the U.S. National Ins...

Plastic Surgery Pays Off for Men

Plastic surgery is no longer the sole domain of women, and men now have even more incentive to try a little nip-and-tuck on their faces: New research suggests they look more attractive and trustworthy to others.

The study included 24 men, average age 49 years, who had one or more of the following procedures: upper eyelid lift, reduction of lower eyelids, face-lift, brow-lift, neck-lif...

Looks Like Guys Are More Prone to Pack on the 'Freshman 15'

When a high school senior becomes a university freshman, change is the name of the game. A new school. New friendships. Even new ways of eating.

As healthy, home-cooked meals give way to a campus diet of beer and pizza, student waistlines tend to expand. But new research shows it is the waistlines of boys that expand the most.

"Males and females display different patterns of...

Abuse, Injury More Likely When Child is With Male Caregiver: Study

Young children are far more likely to suffer abuse-related injuries when left in the care of a man, versus a woman. And those injuries are likely to be more severe, a new study finds.

The study included more than 1,600 children under age 4 who were seen for injuries at a pediatric emergency department. Of those, 24% were found to have been physically abused.

Nearly 80...

New Urine Test Might Show Whether Prostate Cancer Needs Treatment

A man who learns he has prostate cancer faces a difficult choice: whether to immediately treat the cancer despite potential side effects or wait and see if it's a slow-growing tumor that never needs treatment.

Men may soon have help making that decision.

Researchers from the United Kingdom report that they've created a urine test that can predict the aggressiveness of a pr...

Many Young Men Putting Health at Risk to Bulk Up

Image is everything for most teens and young adults, and 22% of young men and 5% of young women turn to potentially dangerous methods to "bulk up," a new study says.

These unhealthy methods -- dubbed "disordered eating behaviors" -- include eating to gain weight and using supplements or anabolic steroids to increase muscle or body size.

"Parents and teens should be...

Help for Impotence Starts With Frank Talk With Doctor

Erectile dysfunction is often treatable, but many men hesitate to discuss it with their doctor.

What's more, doctors don't often bring it up with their patients, according to Dr. Susan MacDonald, a urological surgeon at Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center.

"I think it's because of the stigma attached to it," she said.

When she asks men about whether they can m...

'Daddy-Do-Overs': Men Increasingly Getting Plastic Surgery

A face-lift for Father's Day, anyone?

It could happen: A new report finds many more men are taking advantage of the same plastic surgeries that have long been associated with women.

The midlife decision by men to try a face-lift or other procedure has been nicknamed the "Daddy-Do-Over" -- referencing the "Mommy Makeover" for women.

Whatever it's called, "men are em...

Male Victims of Domestic Violence Often Suffer in Silence

Men who are victims of domestic violence find it hard to get help and the support they need, British researchers report.

"While both men and women are reluctant to seek professional help for their abuse, there is an added barrier for men voiced in these studies, that they may be falsely accused of being the perpetrator. The men also raised wider concerns about masculinity," said study...

'Dad Shaming' Is Real, Survey Shows

It's not just Moms: Just ahead of Father's Day, a new survey finds that about half of American dads say they've been criticized about their parenting styles.

The way they enforced discipline topped the list of things naysayers called them to task on, with two-thirds of critiques focused on that subject.

Forty-four percent of the time, the criticism came from a family member...

Few Prostate Cancer Patients Are Getting Checkups They Need

While men with early-stage prostate cancer can delay treatment, few follow guidelines for monitoring their condition, researchers report.

In fact, their study of nearly 350 men from North Carolina found that only 15% who chose what's known as active surveillance followed the recommended guidelines.

"Active surveillance has rigorous guidelines -- people need regular PSA t...

Testicular Cancer Treatment Unlikely to Trigger Birth Defects

New research should reassure dads-to-be who've had testicular cancer that treatment with radiation or chemotherapy doesn't raise the risk of fathering babies with birth defects.

"Our research set out to investigate whether treatment for the most common cancer among young men leads to a higher risk of fathering a child with a birth defect and we saw no increased risk associated with ca...

Many Middle-Aged Men May Have Signs of Thinning Bones

Brittle bones are often seen as a woman's health issue, but low bone mass may be more common among middle-aged men than generally thought, a small study suggests.

The research, of 173 adults aged 35 to 50, found that men and women were equally likely to have low bone mass in the hip. It was found in 28% of men and 26% of women.

Those study participants, the researche...

'Watchful Waiting' Less Likely for Black Prostate Cancer Patients

"Watchful waiting" is on the rise overall among U.S. men with low-risk prostate cancer, but black men remain less likely to opt for it, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers examined 2010-2015 data on more than 50,000 low-risk prostate cancer patients in the United States. The investigators found that black men were 16% less likely than other men to decide on watchful wai...

How Does Room Temperature Affect Test Scores?

If you're taking a test, you might want to check the thermostat first.

Room temperature -- a frequent front in the battle of the sexes -- makes a difference in how men and women score on math and verbal tests, new research says.

Specifically, women scored higher when the temperature was warmer. Men did better when the room was cooler.

Many surveys have found women...

Older Dads' Sperm Isn't What It Used to Be

Just because a guy can make babies later in life doesn't mean it's risk-free.

The partners and children of men who become fathers at an older age are at increased risk for health problems, a new study finds.

"While it is widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy and the health of the child, most men do not realiz...

Mustaches Are More Than Just Manly, They Guard Against Sun's Rays

For all of those men who view a mustache as a largely ornamental addition to their masculine appearance, a new study reveals it can also guard against lip cancer.

"Mustaches seem to protect the lip the same way that hair protects the scalp," explained study author Dr. Daniel Aires. He is director of dermatology with the University of Kansas Health System. ...

Heavy Teen Boys May Face Higher Heart Disease Risk as Adults

Just a few extra pounds during adolescence may translate into higher odds for heart disease in adulthood, a new study of young men suggests.

It included about 1.7 million Swedish men who began military service at ages 18 or 19 between 1969 and 2005. They were followed for up to 46 years.

During the follow-up, nearly 4,500 were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, an uncommon heart...

AHA News: Study Finds Higher Risk of Stroke-Linked Plaque in Men, Possible Test for Women

Men are more likely than women to develop unstable plaques in their neck arteries, a dangerous condition that can lead to strokes, according to new research that also identified a helpful warning sign for rupture-prone plaques in women.

The preliminary study, presented Thursday at the American Heart Association's Vascular Discovery Scientific Sessions, sought to identify sex-specific...

Is That Prostate Cancer Worth Treating? Chromosomes May Tell

To treat, or not to treat: That remains one of the tough conundrums for men with prostate cancer and their doctors, because some tumors may be aggressive, while others may take decades to cause harm.

Now, new research suggests that tracking specific changes in the number of chromosomes inside prostate cancer cells might help solve the riddle.

Besides giving new insights into...

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