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Results for search "Death &, Dying: Misc.".

12 Aug

Dangers of Football Conditioning

"Irrationally intense" conditioning sessions may be causing more football fatalities, study finds

13 Nov

Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

Cancer will soon pass heart disease as the leading cause of death among adults.

Health News Results - 245

Where Women's Health Clinics Close, Cervical Cancer Outcomes Worsen

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As government funding dried up and many women's health clinics across America closed, cervical cancer screening rates fell and deaths from the disease rose, a new report shows.

Nearly 100 women's health clinics in the United States closed between 2010 and 2013, researchers said -- often due to the passage of more restrictive laws or the loss ...

40-Year Study Sees Steady Rise in Pregnant Women's Blood Pressure

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past four decades, the U.S. has seen a sharp rise in the number of pregnant women with high blood pressure, new research reveals.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from about 151 million hospitalizations between 1970 and 2010 to determine the rates of chronic high blood pressure in pregnant women aged 15 to 49.

C...

Poverty Makes Heart Failure Even More Lethal, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study helps confirm a dismal reality: Poor Americans are more likely to die from heart failure than their richer counterparts.

The likely reasons? According to the researchers, higher obesity rates and associated increases in type 2 diabetes appear to be driving two-thirds of the trend.

"This study underscores the disparitie...

Poor Circulation in Legs? Statin Meds Can Keep You Living Longer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Folks with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have a much lower risk of death if they take cholesterol-lowering statins as directed by their doctor, a new study reports.

About 200 million people worldwide suffer from PAD, a condition in which arteries feeding blood to the legs become clogged, researchers explained.

However, patients who ...

Weight-Loss Surgery Drops Heart Disease, Death Risk for Diabetics

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For people who are obese and have type 2 diabetes, weight-loss surgery leads to more than a slimmer figure.

It also reduces the risk of heart complications and premature death by about 40% compared to standard medical care, new research says.

The Cleveland Clinic researchers compared the impact of various types of weight-loss (ba...

Cancer Overtakes Heart Disease as #1 Killer of Middle-Aged in Wealthy Nations

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease still claims the lives of more people globally, but in more affluent nations it has now ceded its place as the leading killer to cancer, a major new report finds.

Around the world, 40% of all deaths are caused by heart disease, making it the number one global killer. That means that of the estimated 55 million people who die...

Donor Organs Often There for Patients in Need, But Doctors Say No

FRIDAY, Aug. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans who die waiting for a kidney transplant actually had donor organs offered to them multiple times -- but their transplant center declined them.

That's the finding of a new study of over 280,000 U.S. patients who were on kidney transplant waitlists between 2008 and 2015.

It may come as a surprise to anyone who's assumed ...

U.S. Opioid Deaths Take a Small Dip, as Fentanyl Leaves Deadly Mark

THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The good news is overdose deaths from opioids in the United States have dropped slightly in 25 states, but here's the bad news: Deaths from fentanyl are still increasing, federal health officials reported Thursday.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), overdose deaths from fentanyl increased, especially when...

Running Red Lights a Deadly Practice That's Becoming More Common

THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone has done it: breezing through a red light at the last minute. But a new report shows that deaths caused by drivers taking that chance are on the rise in the United States.

There were 939 people killed in red light running crashes in 2017, a 10-year high and a 28% increase since 2012, according to AAA Foundation for Traffic Safet...

Why ADHD Might Raise the Risk of Early Death

TUESDAY, Aug. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Swedish researchers think they have honed in on why people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to die prematurely.

Accidental injuries, suicide and substance abuse all play a part, and psychiatric problems fuel these factors, a new study from the Karolinska Institute suggests.

To arrive at that concl...

Every Sudden Infant Death Deserves a Closer Look: Report

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whenever a healthy infant dies suddenly, that death should be investigated to determine if abuse or neglect was the cause.

So claims a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the National Association of Medical Examiners.

In 2019, infants younger than 1 year accounted for nearly half of 1,750 child maltreatment d...

When Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When you stop smoking, your heart starts to rebound right away, but a full recovery can take as long as 15 years, a new study suggests.

"The benefit of quitting smoking cannot be overstated -- the cardiovascular system begins to recover quickly, with some physiologic changes happening within hours," said lead researcher Meredith Duncan, of th...

Obesity and 'Spare Tire' Raise Hispanics' Odds for Early Death

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Excess weight, especially a "spare tire" around the middle, increases the risk of an earlier death for Hispanics, a large new study suggests.

The study found that for every 5 point increase in body mass index above 25, the risk of dying prematurely went up by 30%.

Body mass index (BMI) is an estimate of a person's fat levels ...

Caring Doctors Can Be Life-Changing for Diabetic Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A kind, understanding doctor could spell the difference between life or death for diabetes patients, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that patients had a lower risk of early death if their primary care doctor exhibited empathy.

The study included 628 patients in the U.K. with type 2 diabetes. A year after their diagnos...

August Is Deadliest Month for Young Football Players

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It is an annual rite of summer: sending young men out on football fields across America in the sweltering August heat for grueling practice sessions designed to prepare them for the coming season.

But a new study shows the ritual can be costly if players are pushed too hard. It is the most common way players die of non-traumatic injuries in hi...

Health Threats Don't End for Some Sepsis Survivors

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that lands its victims in the hospital, but the dangers don't end for survivors who have high levels of inflammation long after being discharged, a new study finds.

"Sepsis is the leading cause of death among hospitalized patients. Patients discharged from the hospital aren't out of the woods yet. Approxim...

Heat Waves Brought by Climate Change Could Prove Deadly for Kidney Patients

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research uncovers yet another population that will be vulnerable to the heat waves that climate change is delivering with increasing frequency: people with kidney disease.

Extremely hot days can increase advanced kidney disease patients' risk of hospitalization and death, and climate change means they'll face more such days, the study aut...

High Blood Pressure Much More Deadly for the Poor

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure exacts a far greater toll on poor people than it does on affluent Americans, a new, national study finds.

The data from the clinical trial, which was designed to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), showed that poor people were half as likely to have their blood pressure controlled over the course of six years. They...

Childhood Cancer Steals Over 11 Million Years of Healthy Life: Study

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are closing in on the toll of childhood cancer, finding it stole 11.5 million years of healthy life lost worldwide in 2017.

Premature death took 97% of that toll, and impaired quality of life about 3%, the study found.

"Estimating the years of healthy life children have lost due to cancer allows policy makers to ...

Where Is Your Risk of Dying Greatest After Surgery?

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have noncardiac surgery are much more likely to die after they leave the hospital than in the operating room, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 40,000 adults, age 45 and older, who were operated on at 28 centers in 14 countries in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia.

Of tho...

Dirty Air Kills 30,000 Americans Each Year

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite improved air quality since the 1990s, pollution still causes lung disease, heart attacks and strokes that kill more than 30,000 Americans each year, a new study estimates.

Researchers looked at concentrations of fine pollution particles known as PM2.5 across the country from 1999 to 2015. These tiny particles -- 30 times smaller than...

Bigger Waistlines a Threat to Women's Health, Even Without Obesity

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A widening waistline can harm the health of older women, even if they avoid obesity, new research suggests.

It's a condition known as "central obesity" -- a concentration of fat around the abdomen. Central obesity can occur even if it's not enough to shift a person's body mass index (BMI) into the obese range, explained researchers led by W...

In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests May Be a 'Major Public Health Problem'

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many more U.S. hospital patients suffer cardiac arrest than previously thought, a new study reveals.

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops beating. It differs from a heart attack, in which blood flow to the heart is blocked.

This new analysis concluded that there are about 38% more adult cases and 18% more cases in child...

Stillbirth Risk Rises With Prolonged Pregnancies

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The longer a pregnancy continues past term, the higher the risk of stillbirth, according to a new study that analyzed 15 million pregnancies.

The highest risk of stillbirth occurred when pregnancies went beyond 41 weeks -- then the odds rose by 87%, the British researchers said.

They stressed, however, that women who are 41 weeks...

Is Your County an Opioid Overdose 'Hotspot'?

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- America's opioid epidemic has claimed thousands of lives, but certain counties in the South and Midwest are paying the highest price more often, researchers say.

For the study, researchers looked at more than 3,000 counties nationwide and found the risk of dying from an opioid overdose was twice as high in 412 counties. These places also had f...

Rates of Drug-, Alcohol-Linked Death Triple After Weight-Loss Surgery

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study offers some sobering news about weight-loss surgery.

People who undergo a gastric bypass procedure called Roux-en-Y are three times more likely than those in the general population to die of drug- or alcohol-related causes, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh.

The reason isn't clear, but laboratory ...

Fatal Opioid ODs Rise as Temperatures Fall

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Why do opioid overdose deaths spike after cold snaps?

That's the mystery Brown University researchers set out to solve in a study of more than 3,000 opioid-related deaths in Connecticut and Rhode Island between 2014 and 2017.

The new analysis uncovered a 25% increase in opioid overdose deaths within three to seven days of free...

Sudden Death Can Occur Even in Well-Controlled Epilepsy

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is rare and thought to mainly affect people with hard-to-treat seizures, but a new study suggests that even people with well-controlled epilepsy may be at risk.

That was especially true if someone had missed their last dose of medication or was sleep-deprived, the researchers found. Drinking too much alc...

Race Affects Life Expectancy in Major U.S. Cities

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fifty-six of America's 500 biggest cities have major gaps in life expectancy between neighborhoods, a new study reveals.

These gaps can mean people in one neighborhood live 20 to 30 years longer than those just a mile away -- and the inequalities are prevalent in cities with high levels of racial and ethnic segregation, according to New York U...

How Your Marital Status Affects Your Odds of Dying From Heart Disease

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your gender and marital status hold telling clues about your risk of dying of heart disease, a large British study suggests.

It found that widowed and divorced men have significantly higher odds of death due to heart disease than women of the same marital status. But single men are more likely to survive heart failure than single women.

...

Keeping the Lid on Global Warming Could Save American Lives

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis suggests the Trump administration should have considered how unchecked climate change might harm U.S. citizens before it pulled out of a pact aimed at slowing down the pace of global warming.

In the study, researchers calculated that tens of thousands of lives in major U.S. cities would be saved annually if rising temperatures...

Falls Are Increasingly Lethal for Older Americans

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Deaths from falls are increasing sharply among elderly Americans, a new study finds.

Nearly 25,000 people 75 and older died as a result of falls in 2016 -- almost three times as many as in 2000. And experts warn that the toll is likely to rise along with population shifts.

"As the United States population continues to age, we can ex...

Women in Cardiac Arrest Less Likely to Receive Help, Study Finds

MONDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women who suffer a cardiac arrest in public are less likely than men to get resuscitation help from bystanders, and more likely to die, new research shows.

For the study, scientists analyzed data on more than 5,700 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred in a province of the Netherlands between 2006 and 2012. Women accounted for 28% o...

Fewer Deaths Tied to Dirty Air, But Threats Persist: Report

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Significant but uneven improvements in air quality have greatly reduced U.S. deaths related to air pollution over the past decade, a new study shows.

But researchers are concerned that climate change and regulatory rollbacks under the Trump administration will wipe out those advances and put thousands more lives at risk from bad air every ye...

Unfiltered Cigarettes Are Most Deadly

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's no such thing as a safe cigarette, but unfiltered cigarettes are even more likely to kill you, a new study finds.

People who smoke unfiltered cigarettes have double the risk of lung cancer death that other smokers do. And smoking unfiltered cigs was also linked to a 30% higher risk of dying from any cause.

"All cigarett...

Sugary Drinks <i>and</i> Fruit Juice May Increase Risk of Early Death

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most folks know that sugary drinks aren't healthy, but a new study finds fruit juices are not much better.

In fact, consuming them regularly may help shorten your life, researchers say.

"Older adults who drink more sugary beverages, which include fruit juice as well as sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages, may be at risk of dying...

Heroin ODs Have Started Declining in Some States

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After years of steady increases, the number of Americans showing up in emergency departments with heroin overdoses is on a downswing, at least in some states.

Between 2017 and 2018, many states saw a dramatic drop in the number of people being rushed to hospitals as a result of a heroin overdose, according to a new report from the U.S. Center...

Many Pregnancy-Related Maternal Deaths Occur Months After Delivery: CDC

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women still die from pregnancy-related causes, some up to a year after delivery, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

About 700 pregnancy-related deaths occur in the United States each year, and 3 out of 5 are preventable, data show.

Nearly 31% of the deaths happen during pregnan...

Slowing Climate Change Could Cut Health Costs, Save Money

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tackling climate change makes economic sense, a new report claims.

The cost of cutting carbon emissions -- enough to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement -- would be offset by reductions in health problems and deaths caused by air pollution, the researchers found.

"These health 'co-benefits' of climate change policy are wide...

U.S. Heart Failure Rates Are Rising, Especially for Black Adults

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people are terrified of having a heart attack, but they might also need to worry about heart failure, particularly if they are black.

After years of decline and despite treatment advances, the risk of dying early from heart failure-related causes started increasing after 2012, new research shows. Black men seem especially hard hit by this ...

Fentanyl Becoming a Deadly Accomplice in Cocaine, Meth Abuse

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As if using cocaine or methamphetamines isn't risky enough, new research shows a sharp spike in urine drug tests that are positive for those drugs and the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl.

The findings could provide insight into steeply rising rates of cocaine- and methamphetamine-related overdoses in the United States.

For th...

U.S. Teen Opioid Deaths Soaring

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of American children and teens who have lost their lives to opioids has nearly tripled since 1999, a new report shows.

Based on data gathered by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the investigators found that the misuse of painkillers and/or illicit opioids (heroin and fentanyl) claimed the lives of nearly 9,000 ...

As Sense of Smell Fades, Does Death Come Closer?

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They say the nose knows, but can a loss of smell signal impending death?

Possibly, researchers say.

They discovered that a poor sense of smell was associated with a nearly 50% higher risk of death within the next decade for adults older than 70.

While the study didn't prove cause and effect, that association is enough ...

Work Stress, Poor Sleep, High Blood Pressure a Deadly Trio

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Job stress, high blood pressure and poor sleep may be a recipe for an early death, German researchers report.

In a study of nearly 2,000 workers with high blood pressure who were followed for almost 18 years, those who reported having both a stressful job and poor sleep were three times more likely to die from heart disease than those who sl...

Half of Older Dialysis Patients Die Within a Year, Study Finds

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate for older Americans receiving dialysis for kidney failure may be nearly twice as high as widely thought, according to a new report.

For the study, researchers looked at 391 Medicare patients, aged 65 and older, who started dialysis, in which a machine is used to remove toxins from the blood.

Nearly 23% of the p...

Fatal Drug ODs Surging Among Young Americans

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of America's opioid epidemic just keeps rising, with new research showing that overdose deaths among teens and young adults are soaring.

The death rate from drug overdoses rose from eight in every 100,000 people aged 15 to 24 in 2006 to nearly 10 per 100,000 in 2015, researchers found.

"Drug poisoning deaths affect famil...

Fatal Medical Emergencies on the Rise Worldwide: Study

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Injuries, heart attacks, lung infections, strokes and other medical emergencies caused about half of the world's 28 million deaths in 2015, a new study reports.

Such deaths are on the rise, and rates are much higher in poor countries than wealthy ones, the researchers said.

"We believe our study is among the first to identify the...

Many 'Gen Xers'  Desolate as They Navigate Adulthood: Study

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despair runs rampant through Generation X as these Americans struggle through middle age, a new study reports.

So-called indicators of despair -- depression, suicide, drug and alcohol abuse -- are rising among those in their late 30s and early 40s, and it's occurring across-the-board, researchers say.

"These are getting worse as peo...

Sit All Day at Work? Exercise Can Counter That

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your job keeps you chained to a desk all day, you might be able to erase the ill effects with regular exercise, a large new study suggests.

Research has shown that people who spend a lot of time sitting may pay for it with a higher heart disease risk and a shorter lifespan. But the new study, of nearly 150,000 adults, indicates you can avo...

Babies Still Dying Due to Unsafe Sleep Practices

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The death of a baby is always tragic, but safe sleep practices could have prevented some recent suffocation deaths, new research claims.

The study found two factors appeared to be behind a majority of infant deaths by suffocation:

  • A baby not sleeping on his or her back.
  • A baby sleeping in an adult bed.
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