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Results for search "Safety &, Public Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 556

Being Bullied Often Leads Teens to Thoughts of Violence

Bullied and mistreated teens are much more likely to fantasize about hurting or killing others, a new study warns.

"One way to think about fantasies is as our brain rehearsing future scenarios," said lead author Manuel Eisner, director of the University of Cambridge Violence Research Center in the U.K.

His research included more than 1,400 young people in Zurich, Switzerland, who we...

CDC Says Vaccinated Can Shed Masks Outside, Except in Crowds

Fully vaccinated Americans can now go without masks when walking, jogging or biking outdoors, or when dining with small groups at outdoor restaurants, U.S. health officials announced Tuesday.

The latest guidance, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, followed growing calls from infectious disease experts to drop mask mandates outside because breezes rapidly disperse ai...

Nothing to Sniff at: Depression Common for People With COVID-Linked Smell Loss

TUESDAY, April 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Loss of the sense of smell and taste is often an early and enduring symptom of COVID-19. Now, research suggests that for many COVID survivors with long-term sensory loss, it's also depressing.

In a web-based survey completed by 322 adults with COVID and a sudden change in smell or taste, 56% reported decreased enjoyment in li...

'Breakthrough' COVID Infections After Vaccination Very Rare: Study

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- COVID-19 "breakthrough" infections, where someone who's been fully vaccinated becomes infected nonetheless, are exceedingly rare, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Rockefeller University in New York City said they uncovered just two breakthrough infections in a group of 417 university employees who were all more than two w...

Biden, Fauci Say Pause in J&J COVID Vaccine Is Sign That Safety Comes First

The Biden Administration sought to reassure Americans on Tuesday that the pausing of Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine is science at work, and not evidence that COVID-19 vaccines are unsafe.

The pause was first issued Tuesday morning following reports that rare but serious blood clots had developed in six women after they took J&J's vaccine. The Advisory Committee on Immunizati...

What Will Summer Camp Look Like This Year?

Splashing in a pool. Hiking through fresh green forests. Making macaroni art. Stitching together a leather wallet. Knocking a kickball around.

It's nearly time for summer camp, and the experience is expected to be especially important for America's children because of the pandemic.

"We really feel like summer camps are a huge opportunity for kids to disconnect from screens that they...

As U.S. Vaccinations Rise, Are 'Vaccine Passports' for Americans Coming?

With tens of millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses going into American arms, pressure is mounting for a U.S. "vaccine passport" that would allow the fully immunized to travel freely and more easily enjoy other aspects of pre-pandemic life.

More than two dozen airline trade organizations, labor unions and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have asked the White House to "establish uniform guidance" ...

Storm Alert: How to Keep Your Home Safe

Winter weather can bring hidden dangers, the most deadly of which can include carbon monoxide poisoning and fires.

As blizzards, tornadoes and severe storms batter the nation and many lose power and heat, the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires from portable generators and other devices increase exponentially, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

Carb...

Alzheimer's Patients Are Being Given Too Many Meds

Many older adults with dementia are prescribed dangerous combinations of drugs that raise their risk of overdose, falls and further mental deterioration, a new study finds.

About 1 in 7 people with dementia living outside of nursing homes are taking three or more drugs that act on their brain and nervous system, researchers reported.

The most troubling combinations involved opi...

AHA News: HousingLink Gives Families Fleeing Domestic Violence a Second Chance

For nearly two years, Ms. D's 8-year-old twins exclaim "Home sweet home!" every time they cross the threshold of their New York City apartment.

Domestic violence drove the family out of their house and into shelter life for nine months. At one point, they commuted two hours each way from Brooklyn to Manhattan so the children would not have to change schools again.

The odds were stac...

Kids Aren't Scared by Medical Workers' PPE, Study Finds

Kids aren't scared when surgical staff wear personal protective equipment (PPE), and many feel reassured by use of the gear, researchers say.

Anxiety is common before, during and after surgery, and can result in complications such as pain and delayed recovery. Concerns have been raised that seeing staffers wearing PPE such as hoods, masks and gowns during the coronavirus pandemic might in...

You're More Likely to Maintain Social Distance If Your Friends Do: Study

Family and friends can influence whether people follow social distancing recommendations during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study finds.

British researchers analyzed information from more than 6,600 people in 114 countries. Those who thought their close social circle adhered to distancing guidelines were more likely to do the same, the analysis found.

This influence outweighed w...

Are Pricey Air Ambulance Rides Really Saving More Lives?

Air ambulance service is pricey, but promises lifesaving speed by providing rapid straight-line helicopter transport for critically ill patients.

But a new study out of Denmark questions whether that expensive haste winds up saving more lives.

Researchers found no statistically significant difference in the death rate between people transported by ground ambulance or helicopter, acc...

Facebook Posts Big Drivers in Vaccine Resistance, Study Finds

As Americans await their COVID-19 shot, a new study of a different vaccine shows the power of Facebook posts in fueling "anti-vax" resistance to immunization.

The study included more than 10 years of public Facebook posts on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It found that nearly 40% of 6,500 HPV vaccine-related posts from 2006 to 2016 amplified a perceived risk. The data suggest the...

'Pandemic Fatigue' Setting in? Here's How to Stay Safe and Strong

The COVID-19 pandemic may feel like it's been going on forever, but it's important to keep up safety measures, a mental health expert says.

Dr. Olusinmi Bamgbose, a psychiatrist at Cedars-Sinai in Southern California -- an area that's facing an unprecedented surge in coronavirus cases -- offered some tips for keeping up with pandemic safeguards and some theories about why people may be ba...

Gym Closed? You Don't Need Exercise Equipment to Stay Fit, Study Shows

If the pandemic has shut down your gym, you can still stay or get fit with a simple home exercise plan, researchers say.

The Canadian study was modeled on a fitness plan known as "5BX," or Five Basic Exercises, which was originally developed in the 1950s for the Royal Canadian Air Force. The plan doesn't depend on special equipment and can be adjusted to individual fitness levels.

...

Allergic Reactions to COVID Vaccines Are Rare, Resolved on Site: CDC

Cases of anaphylactic shock caused by COVID-19 vaccines are very rare, based on numbers from the first week and a half of vaccinations in the United States, federal public health officials said Wednesday.

There have been 21 cases of anaphylaxis out of nearly 1.9 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine administered in the very first days of the national COVID-19 vaccination program, s...

Red Cross Issues Call for More Blood Plasma to Treat COVID Patients

The American Red Cross is urging COVID-19 survivors to donate blood plasma for hospital patients who need it to recover.

As an incentive to help boost the national convalescent plasma shortage, the Red Cross has teamed up with the National Football League and is offering donors a chance to win two tickets to next year's Super Bowl LVI in Los Angeles.

The Red Cross is especially aski...

Vaccine Rollout Could Have Americans Back to Normalcy by Summer, Expert Says

A return to normal life in America might happen sooner than many expect, one of the nation's leading vaccine experts told HD Live! this week.

As the new coronavirus rages across the country, President-elect Joe Biden has set a goal of one million doses of vaccine delivered every day once he takes office. If that ambitious target is realized, everyday conditions in the United States might ...

Survey Shows Mental Woes Spiked in U.S. Pandemic's First Months

It may be no surprise that the COVID-19 pandemic is causing some Americans significant psychological distress. That mental trauma hit people hard, even early in the pandemic, new research shows.

A new RAND Corporation study reports that more than 10% of Americans surveyed said they experienced psychological distress during April and May of 2020 -- the same number as in all of 2019.

...

Almost 47 Million Americans Already Infected With Coronavirus by Nov. 15: Study

By Nov. 15 of last year, roughly 47 million Americans -- about 14.5% of the U.S. population -- had already been infected with the new coronavirus, a new study finds.

That's much higher than the close to 11 million known U.S. cases of infection that were recorded by that date, the researchers said, because reported cases "do not represent the full SARS-CoV-2 disease burd...

Police Use of Neck Restraint Never Medically Appropriate, Neurologists Say

Despite training that teaches police officers to use neck restraints, there is no medical justification for the tactic, three neurologists write in JAMA Neurology.

The killing of George Floyd, who died in May 2020 after an arresting police officer pressed a knee to his neck for more than eight minutes, helped spark a nationwide conversation about racial injustice.

While Fl...

Tips for Making 2021 a Healthier Year

A New Year's resolution to take better care of yourself is one you should keep, especially in the era of COVID-19.

Wearing a mask, maintaining a safe distance from others and washing your hands frequently are going remain important in 2021. But don't forget to prioritize a healthy lifestyle that improves your overall health and quality of life, and helps prevent cancer, according to exper...

How to Sleep Better in 2021

If you're like most American adults, you're not getting enough sleep.

This could be the year to change that, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), which recommends adults get at least seven hours of sleep each night. A survey conducted in July showed that 85% of adults in the United States get less.

"Our survey findings show a worrying trend of national sleep d...

Vaping May Addle the Adolescent Brain

Teenagers who use e-cigarettes may be at increased risk of "mental fog," a new study suggests.

The study, of thousands of U.S. teens, found that those who vaped were three times more likely than their peers to report problems with concentration, memory and decision-making.

The findings mirror those of a recent study of adults by the same research team: Men and women who used e-...

Precautions Even More Important With New Coronavirus Variant: Experts

THURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2020 -- A new and more infectious variant of the COVID-19 virus has shown up in separate cases in Colorado and California, weeks after it first emerged in the United Kingdom.

Doctors on the pandemic's front line say people shouldn't panic, but should definitely adhere even more closely to proven infection control measures, like mask wearing and social distancing.

...

When Popping Champagne at New Years', Watch Out for That Cork

As 2020 comes to a close, many people plan to ring in the new year with a bit of bubbly.

But that can lead to calamity when not done safely, warns the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), which offers tips for keeping a Champagne toast from going wrong.

A warm bottle of Champagne paired with poor technique for opening it can send a cork flying up to 50 miles per hour, threatenin...

Masks Don't Mask Others' Emotions for Kids

Children can still read the emotional expressions of people wearing masks during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

"We now have this situation where adults and kids have to interact all the time with people whose faces are partly covered, and a lot of adults are wondering if that's going to be a problem for children's emotional development," said study co-author Ashley Ruba, a postd...

Which Seafood Has the Highest Amount of Microplastics?

Those mussels, oysters and scallops on your plate may come with a secret ingredient: microplastics.

Researchers at Hull York Medical School and the University of Hull in the United Kingdom reviewed more than 50 studies (from 2014 to 2020) to investigate the levels of microplastic contamination globally in fish and shellfish.

The investigators found that mollusks (such as clams, muss...

Preventing COVID Means Wearing Masks While Social Distancing: Study


Keep your distance. Although wearing a mask can limit transmission of droplets that spread COVID-19, it may not be enough unless people also stay at least six feet apart, new research shows.

Researchers at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces found that at distances of less than six feet, enough droplets to potentially cause illness still made it through several masks made of co...

Hurricanes Leave Rise in Hospitalizations in Their Wake

Hospitals are swamped with older patients after hurricanes, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on hospitalizations for adults 65 and older in the month following eight of the United States' largest hurricanes in recent years.

In this age group, post-hurricane increases in hospitalizations for any reason ranged from 10% (Hurricane Irene, 2011) to 23% (Hurricane Sandy, 2012)...

Allergists' Group Updates Guidelines on COVID-19 Vaccines

In very rare cases, some people have had severe allergic reactions after receiving the new COVID-19 vaccines, leading the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI) to issue updated guidance for Americans with allergies.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given emergency use authorization to COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

The ACAAI's COVI...

Mask Wearing Declines, Even as COVID-19 Touches More U.S. Lives: Poll

Despite more Americans saying they know someone who's been sickened or even died from COVID-19, there's been a decline in the percentage who say they always wear a mask when they leave their home.

Two-thirds (66%) of U.S. adults surveyed in a new HealthDay/Harris Poll said they "always" donned a mask when leaving their home and weren't able to socially distance, compared with 72%...

Don't Believe Vaccine Myths

There's a lot of misinformation about vaccines as the United States begins its massive COVID-19 vaccination program, so an expert wants to dispel the many myths about vaccines in general.

Vaccines are among the most heavily studied of all drugs, and the evidence shows they are safe and extremely effective, according to Dr. Patrick Gavigan, a pediatric infectious disease physician at Penn ...

Most Americans Oppose COVID Vaccine Mandates: Survey

Though many Americans would support a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, a Gallup survey finds there is no clear majority in favor of it.

The Gallup Panel conducted the online survey of 2,730 U.S. adults between Sept. 14 and 27.

Nearly 49% of respondents said they would "accept" a state mandate requiring children to be vaccinated in order to attend school. But support fell to 41% when respon...

How to Guard Against Home Heating Hazards

Many Americans are working at home or attending school virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to increased use of home heating and its potential risks, an expert says.

Heating sources can pose electrical hazards and fire dangers, noted Purnima Unni, manager of the pediatric trauma injury prevention program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University in Nashv...

Narrow Hallways Ideal for Coronavirus Spread: Study

You might want to think twice before you enter a hallway with strangers during the pandemic: Researchers report that following a fast-walking person with COVID-19 down a narrow corridor could increase your risk of infection, even if you keep your distance.

That's because that person can leave long streams of virus-laden droplets behind them, according to a study published Dec. 15 in th...

USPS Cuts Could Pose Harm If Mail-Order Meds Delayed: Study

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16, 2020 (HealthDay)-- Delayed mail delivery due to a push from the White House and others to slash spending and services could have enormous consequences for Americans who depend on the U.S. Postal Service for access to urgently needed prescription medications, a new study warns.

"We found that among those who rely exclusively on mail-order pharmacies, about half are elde...

COVID Vaccine Won't Reach All the World's People Until 2022: Study

Amid hopes stirred by the recent rollout of an approved COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, a new study warns that shots may not be available to nearly one-quarter of the world's people until 2022.

A second study estimates that 3.7 billion adults worldwide are willing to get the vaccine.

Together, these two findings suggest that getting people immunized could be as big a challeng...

329 Americans Are Injured by Guns Every Day: Study

Firearm injury is a major health crisis in the United States and new research sheds more light on how many of those who are injured survive and the circumstances of their shootings.

For the study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University analyzed nationwide data from death certificates and emergency room visits.

Between 2009 and 2017, the United States...

Saliva Equals Nasal Swab for COVID Test Accuracy

A self-collected saliva sample is as good at detecting COVID-19 as a nasal swab administered by a health care worker -- without exposing medical staff to the virus while collecting the sample.

"The current pandemic has placed a significant strain on the supply chain, from swabs to the personal protective equipment [PPE] health care workers need to safely collect samples," explained lead i...

COVID-19 Vaccines: Experts Answer Your Questions

Two new COVID-19 vaccines, developed at record-setting speed, are soon to be assessed by U.S. agencies for emergency use in combating the ongoing pandemic.

Advisory panels of infectious disease experts this week will assess a vaccine developed by pharmaceutical company Pfizer and German biotech firm BioNTech -- a vaccine that Britain began administering to its most vulnerable citizens on ...

Could Tanning Raise a Woman's Odds for Endometriosis?

Young women who regularly visit tanning salons may have an increased risk of developing endometriosis, a new study suggests.

Researchers said the findings, from a large study of U.S. women, don't prove that tanning beds help cause the painful pelvic condition.

But, they noted, the study might give women more incentive to avoid indoor tanning.

Endometriosis is a condition in wh...

How Safe Are the New COVID Vaccines?

Two COVID-19 vaccines are on the verge of approval in the United States, with pharmaceutical companies promising that millions of doses will be available to the first wave of recipients within a matter of weeks.

Creating two vaccines in less than a year is an astonishing achievement, experts say, but the next task could prove even more difficult — convincing Americans that it's safe to ...

High Blood Sugar Ups COVID Risks, Even in Non-Diabetics

COVID-19 patients with abnormally high blood sugar are at increased risk for serious illness and death, even if they don't have diabetes, new research shows.

The study included more than 11,300 non-critically ill adults with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in Spain between March and the end of May 2020. Of those, 19% were previously diagnosed with diabetes.

In all, one in five patien...

Youth Vaping Rates Have Plunged During Lockdown: Study

Vaping among teens and young adults has decreased dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, with two-thirds of e-cigarette users reporting that they've either cut back or quit, a new study says.

About 32% of e-cigarette users said they quit this year and another 35% reported cutting back, according to survey results published Dec. 3 in JAMA Network Online.

Concerns about l...

Football-Loving States Drop The Ball on Concussion: Study

States with strong football cultures have often fumbled measures to protect young players who've suffered concussions, researchers say.

They analyzed youth concussion laws introduced by states between 2007 and 2014, specifically guidelines requiring a 24-hour delay before sending a player with a possible concussion back onto the field.

The researchers found that states with college ...

Some Talc Products Contain Asbestos: Study

Nearly 15% of talc-based cosmetic products analyzed in a recent study contained asbestos.

Environmental Working Group (EWG) -- an American advocacy nonprofit that commissioned the tests and did the analysis -- said methods used by the cosmetics industry to screen talc supplies are inadequate. The voluntary testing method developed by industry is not sensitive enough to screen for asbestos...

Wood-Fired Cooking a Cause of Lung Illness in Developing World

People who cook with wood instead of other fuels may be at risk of lung damage because of the pollutants and bacterial toxins they're breathing, a small study suggests.

Researchers studied the impact of cookstove pollutants on 23 people in Thanjavur, India, who use liquefied petroleum gas or wood biomass (wood, crop waste or wood brush) to cook.

They measured concentrations of pollu...

College Kid Coming Home for Thanksgiving? Here's How to Keep Your Family Safe

As college students prepare to leave their campuses for Thanksgiving or study remotely for the rest of the semester, families should consider their risks and work to reduce them, according to an infectious disease expert.

Dr. David Cennimo, an assistant professor in pediatric infectious disease at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, offered suggestions on how families could appro...

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