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Results for search "Safety &, Public Health: Misc.".

07 Jun

How Many Microplastic Particles Do We Really Consume?

Men, women and children may be consuming tens of thousands of microplastic particles each year.

29 Mar

States That Ban Texting While Driving Safer?

States with primary texting bans see fewer crash victims in the hospital.

Health News Results - 418

Just 2% of Patients Who Need It Get Anti-Opioid Drug Naloxone

Naloxone can prevent opioid overdose deaths, but only a tiny percentage of Americans at risk are prescribed the lifesaving drug.

That's the key finding from an analysis of nationwide data on adults with private health insurance.

The researchers found that while naloxone (Evzio, Narcan) prescriptions in this group rose between January 2014 and mid-2017, only 1.6% of thos...

Screening for Chinese Coronavirus to Start at 3 Major Airports: CDC

Travelers from China will now have to undergo enhanced screening at three major U.S. airports for symptoms of a new coronavirus that has caused an outbreak of pneumonia in China, federal health officials said Friday.

The three airports -- San Francisco (SFO), New York (JFK) and Los Angeles (LAX) -- receive the most travelers from central China, officials explained.

The U.S. ...

Sepsis Causes Far More Deaths Worldwide Than Thought

Sepsis kills more than twice as many people worldwide as once believed, and children in poor regions account for an excessive number of such deaths, researchers say.

Sepsis is an out-of-control immune response to infection that harms organs. People who survive sepsis can have lifelong disabilities.

In 2017, there were 48.9 million cases of sepsis and 11 million sepsis deaths...

Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring Worse

Uncle Sam has a message for sluggish Americans: Get moving now.

More than 15% of American adults are physically inactive, a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reports. And all that time on the couch or staring into a computer screen adds to the risk of health problems and premature death.

"Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much...

NFL Joins Blood Drive by Giving Away 2 Super Bowl Tickets

Want free tickets to Super Bowl LIV in Miami? Roll up your sleeve and give blood this week.

The American Red Cross has an urgent need for all blood types, but especially for type O.

People who donate blood or platelets by Jan. 19 will be entered automatically in a drawing for two tickets to this year's big game.

It's part of an effort by the Red Cross and the Nat...

HIV Triggers Immune System 'Amnesia' to Smallpox: Study

HIV infection causes a loss of immunity to smallpox, even in people who were vaccinated as kids and are taking antiretroviral drugs to restore their immune system, a new study finds.

Such "HIV-associated immune amnesia" could explain why people with HIV who are on antiretroviral therapy still have shorter lives on average than people without HIV, according to the researchers.

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New Study Reports Alarming Surge in E-Scooter Accidents

Electric scooter accidents are sending droves to emergency rooms -- especially young adults, a new study finds.

As e-scooters' popularity has exploded, so have injuries -- skyrocketing 222% between 2014 and 2018 to more than 39,000. Hospital admissions also soared -- 365% to nearly 3,300.

Head injuries made up about a third of the injuries -- twice the rate seen in...

Would Tighter Swimming Rules at Public Beaches, Lakes and Rivers Save Lives?

Drowning death rates at public beaches, lakes and rivers are three to four times lower in states with tighter rules for swimming in such locations, a new U.S. study finds.

Researchers analyzed U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to focus on the 20 states with the highest rates and the 10 states with the lowest rates of drowning deaths among people over age 5. Open wat...

Don't Believe Online Claims for Pot's 'Benefits'

A lot of the dope you read online about the benefits of marijiuana is just hooey, but it can influence attitudes and actions, researchers say.

Looking at tens of thousands of pot-related posts on Twitter, researchers saw a lot of bogus health claims that they fear may drown out solid science.

"These misleading messages are pervasive online," said researcher Jon-Patrick Alle...

Patients Often Bring Undetected 'Superbug' to the Hospital: Study

One in 10 hospital patients who develop Clostridioides difficile infections may already have the dangerous germ when admitted, but no diarrhea symptoms, a new study finds.

The new report suggests that such infections originate outside hospitals more often than believed, and that patients could be screened to prevent the spread of C. difficile, according to the authors.

Insecticides Tied to Heart Disease Deaths

People with high levels of a common insecticide in their system are far more vulnerable to heart disease, a new study suggests.

According to Wei Bao, assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and colleagues, people who have been exposed to pyrethroid insecticides are three times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those wit...

As Manufacturing Jobs End, Opioid OD Deaths May Rise

It's a connection that health officials might miss, but an alarming new study shows that when factories close, deaths from opioid overdoses soar.

"There's this sense of increasing despair among people -- especially people who are working-class who have seen in the last several decades a lot of their economic opportunities wither away," said lead researcher Dr. Atheendar Venkataraman...

Cases of Flu Continue to Mount Across America

Flu continues to spread throughout the United States and has reached elevated levels in nearly every state.

"We're still seeing an increase in activity, which is what we've been experiencing over the last few weeks," said Dr. Scott Epperson, an epidemiologist in the influenza division of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

So far the CDC estimates th...

Don't Let Those Christmas Lights Land You in the ER

A white Christmas is everyone's wish, but navigating the snow and cold can land some folks in the ER during the holidays.

Luckily, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) has some helpful hints on having a safe and happy holiday.

"Cold weather months put many people at greater risk of avoidable injuries," said Dr. William Jaquis, president of ACEP.

"Ho...

Despite Danger, Tanning Beds Still a Fixture in Many Gyms

Widely condemned for driving up skin cancer risk, tanning beds remain common in that shrine to healthy living: gyms.

That's the finding from a study of tanning beds in three of America's six largest gym chains: Anytime Fitness, Planet Fitness and Gold's Gym.

Collectively, they operate more than 1,900 branches in the areas included in the study (33 states and Washington, D.C....

Youth Vapers Often Use Nicotine or Pot, Not Just Flavoring

Three-quarters of U.S. teens who use e-cigarettes are vaping addictive or mind-altering substances -- more than once suspected, according to a new study.

The findings add to growing concerns about teen vaping.

"We found that youth were more likely to report vaping nicotine and marijuana than 'just flavoring' only, and that cigarette smoking intensity was associated with an i...

Eye Injuries From Household Cleaners Drop, But Kids Remain at Risk

Having little ones visit for the holidays? Be sure to stow household cleaners safely out of their reach.

These products are a major source of reports to U.S. poison control centers, and exposures often involve the eyes. Though overall eye exposures have declined in the United States, the number of cases involving young children remains high.

Between 2000 and 2016, U.S. poiso...

A New Approach to Stop High-Risk Drunk Drivers

An individualized approach is needed to treat people at high risk of impaired (drunk) driving, a new report says.

Drunk driving accounted for 29% of U.S. motor vehicle deaths in 2018, the lowest percentage since 1982. But there was still an average of one alcohol-impaired driving death every 50 minutes, or 29 deaths a day, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHS...

Sleepy Nurses Could Put Patients at Risk

Nurses get less sleep before their scheduled shifts compared to nonwork days, which could affect patient care, according to a new study.

How much less sleep? Almost an hour and a half.

"Nurses are sleeping, on average, less than recommended amounts prior to work, which may have an impact on their health and performance on the job," said study lead author Amy Witkoski Stimpfe...

FDA Testing Levels of Carcinogen in Diabetes Drug Metformin

Levels of possible cancer-causing chemicals in metformin diabetes medications are under investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Metformin is a prescription drug used to control high blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Over the past year and a half, several types of drugs -- including angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) used for high blood pressu...

Cleaner Air Quickly Brings Big Health Benefits, Study Finds

When people are breathing cleaner air, their health generally improves -- rapidly, in some cases, a new review shows.

The report, from the Environmental Committee of the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), details some of the evidence on air quality and human health. Overall, it concludes, people can reap a range of benefits when air pollution is cut -- from fewer as...

BPA Levels in Humans Are Underestimated: Study

Levels of the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in people's bodies are much higher than once thought, according to scientists who say they've created a more accurate way to measure them.

BPA is used in many plastic products, including food and drink containers, and animal studies have shown that it can interfere with hormones. Exposure to BPA in the womb has been linked to growth...

Caffeine, Cough Medicines: What's in the Average Blood Transfusion

If you ever get a blood transfusion, that supposedly pure blood is likely to contain something more: caffeine, cough medicine and an anti-anxiety drug, a new study suggests.

Oregon State University (OSU) researchers analyzed 18 batches of human blood serum pooled from multiple donors, and every batch tested positive for caffeine.

In addition, 13 batches contained the anti-an...

Fewer Americans Now Struggle With 'Problem' Pot Use

There are fewer problem "potheads" today than before the wave of marijuana legalization that's swept the United States, a new analysis of federal survey data shows.

Researchers found an across-the-board decline in daily or near-daily pot users who could be diagnosed with cannabis use disorder, according to results published in the Dec. 1 issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Hitting the Highway This Holiday Season? Buckle Up in Front and Back

If you're among the millions of Americans planning to take to the road this holiday season, remember to make everybody in your vehicle buckle up.

Each year, hundreds of unbelted back seat passengers are killed in crashes, according to a new Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report.

In 2018, 803 unrestrained rear seat passengers age 8 and older lost their lives in c...

Recalls of Blood Pressure Med Took Toll on Patients' Health

Emergency room visits for high blood pressure surged following last year's recall of the popular heart drug valsartan, Canadian researchers report.

Within the first month of the recall, there was a 55% increase of people coming to Ontario-area emergency departments complaining of high blood pressure, said lead researcher Cynthia Jackevicius. She is a senior scientist with the Inst...

Studies Confirm HPV Shot Is Safe

The HPV vaccine gives parents a chance to prevent their children from developing some types of cancer, and two new studies reaffirm what past research has found -- the vaccine is safe.

The two studies included millions of doses of Gardasil 9 vaccine, the only vaccine currently used in the United States for the prevention of HPV-related cancers.

"The data from our study was...

Protect Yourself From Frigid-Weather Emergencies

As temperatures plummet across the U.S., people should take steps to prevent weather-related threats to their health, one expert says.

Seniors and children are at particular risk, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) warns.

"Winter storms raise the risk of car accidents, frostbite, hypothermia and other emergencies," ACEP president Dr. William Jaquis said in a...

Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,100, CDC Says

The number of Americans stricken with a severe lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 2,172, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That's a rise from the 2,051 case total from a week ago.

Cases have now been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by three over the past we...

Older Cyclists Prone to Injury: Study

More bicyclists on the road make cycling safer, but head and face injuries still occur, a new study finds.

From 2008 to 2017, even as the number of bike riders increased, the number of head and face injuries stayed steady, according to researchers from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

"We believe this may be due to a safety-in-numbers phenomenon, whereby increased public...

Needle Exchange Programs Guard Against HIV

Needle exchange programs in two large U.S. cities prevented thousands of new HIV infections and saved hundreds of millions of dollars, researchers say.

Needle, or syringe, exchange programs prevented nearly 10,600 new cases of HIV in Philadelphia and almost 1,900 new cases of HIV in Baltimore over 10 years, leading to significant savings for the cities, the new study found.

...

Plants Will Not Boost Your Home's Air Quality: Study

Don't count on potted plants to keep your home's air clean.

Dispelling a common belief, researchers at Drexel University in Philadelphia found that natural ventilation does a far better job than houseplants in maintaining air quality in homes and offices.

"This has been a common misconception for some time. Plants are great, but they don't actually clean indoor air quickly e...

Vitamin E Acetate Is Leading Suspect in Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses: CDC

A new federal report points to an oily chemical known as vitamin E acetate as the likely culprit behind more than 2,000 cases of severe lung illness among vapers.

After taking fluid samples from the lungs of 29 vapers who were hospitalized for the illness in 10 states, scientists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention spotted the chemical in all of the samples.

Juul Stops Sales of Mint-Flavored E-Cigarettes

Juul Labs will halt sales of its mint-flavored electronic cigarettes, the company announced Thursday.

The latest move follows new government research that showed Juul is the most popular brand among high schoolers who vape, and that the majority of young vapers like mint-flavored e-cigarettes the most.

"These results are unacceptable, and that is why we must reset the vap...

Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,000, CDC Says

The number of Americans stricken with a severe lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 2,051, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That's a rise from the 1,888 case total from a week ago.

Currently, cases have been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by two over the pa...

When Your Teen Wants a Tattoo

"Mom, can I get a tattoo?" Tats, along with body piercings, have become mainstream.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that 29% of the population has at least one tattoo. So this is a question you're likely to face as a parent. You may not be in favor of it, but it's important to know what steps to take, especially if your child is insistent.

First, find out ...

Anti-Vaxxers Find Ways Around States' 'Personal Exemption' Bans

When parents can no longer get "personal-belief" exemptions from childhood vaccinations, they may get around it by asking for religious exemptions for their kids, a new study finds.

Researchers found that after Vermont banned personal-belief exemptions, the number of kindergartners with religious exemptions from vaccination suddenly shot up -- from 0.5% to nearly 4%.

Most Americans Fear Cancer, but Feel Powerless to Prevent It: Survey

While 6 in 10 Americans say they're concerned about developing cancer, only 1 in 4 make cancer prevention part of their daily lives, a new online survey reveals.

Roughly a quarter think there's nothing they can do to prevent it. But the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) says as many of half of cancer cases are preventable.

"Tobacco use, diet, sun exposure, alcohol...

Measles Leaves People More Vulnerable to Future Infections

People who contract measles aren't out of the woods after their rash fades and their fever subsides.

They're then more vulnerable to other bacterial and viral infections -- even those they've already been vaccinated against or have had before.

That's because measles virus attacks the cells that serve as the immune system's memory, wiping out established resistance to diseas...

Close to 1,900 Cases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness, CDC Says

The number of Americans stricken with a severe, sometimes fatal lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 1,888, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That's a rise from the 1,604 case total from a week ago.

Currently, cases have been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by...

Number of Americans With Dementia Will Double by 2040: Report

Nearly 13 million Americans will have dementia by 2040 -- nearly twice as many as today, a new report says.

The number of women with dementia is expected to rise from 4.7 million next year to 8.5 million in 2040. The number of men with dementia is projected to increase from 2.6 million to 4.5 million.

Over the next 20 years, the economic impact of Alzheimer's disease and oth...

After Mass Shootings, Docs Even Less Likely to Mention Gun Safety

After a mass shooting, pediatricians are less likely to ask parents about gun safety in the home, a new study finds.

Researchers examined records from more than 16,500 routine visits to the University of Utah's pediatric clinic between January 2017 and July 2018. One question parents are typically asked at these appointments is whether there are guns in the home and whether they're lo...

Cases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness Now Top 1,600

More than 1,600 Americans have now been struck by a severe, sometimes fatal, lung illness tied to vaping, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

The 1,604 cases have popped up in every state except Alaska, the agency said.

The related death toll has also risen to 34 fatalities, spread across 24 states. Deaths have involved patients ranging fro...

More Teens Learning to Drive in Safer Conditions

Could America's roads become safer in the future?

Maybe.

A new online survey involving just over 1,400 participants showed that a growing number of American teens are getting their driver's license before age 18, which means more of them are learning to drive under supervised conditions.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety study released Oct. 21 surveyed teens an...

FDA May Put Strong Warning on Breast Implants

Before receiving breast implants, women should be told of the possible risks, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says in a draft proposal.

The agency suggests a boxed warning and a checklist outlining potential harms, such as pain, fatigue and further surgery.

"We have heard from many women that they are not fully informed of the risks when considering breast implants. T...

A Workout to Protect Your Thumbs

The range of motion of the human thumb makes so many everyday hand movements possible. Whether you're an athlete gripping sports equipment, a baker whisking egg whites or a do-it-yourselfer hammering a nail, you'd be at a total loss without your thumbs. Yet most people do little to protect these overlooked but essential digits.

First, be aware of the common ways you can injure your th...

Mercury in Creams, Feces in Cosmetics: Beware Bargain Beauty Products

Stocking up on the latest beauty products can be costly. Is it possible to save money and still put your best face forward?

You may luck out and find things on sale at reputable retailers. But beware of prices that seem too good to be true on the internet or from sellers that may not be around tomorrow, like a flea market vendor.

Buy these products and you may end up with ...

Juul Halts Sale of Fruit, Dessert Flavors of E-Cigarettes

Juul, which makes the top-selling brand of electronic-cigarettes in the United States, said Thursday it will no longer sell fruit or dessert flavors of its products.

The company's decision comes as it faces widespread criticism that its flavored nicotine products are hooking a generation of teenagers on nicotine and vaping, the Associated Press reported Thursday.

The ...

None of Top-Selling Kids' Drinks Meet Experts' Health Recommendations

Drinks marketed to children often contain loads of unhealthy sugars and sweeteners, and they come in packages that deliver too-large servings, a new report finds.

None of 34 sweetened drinks aimed at the youth market meet nutrition recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), according to University of Connecticut researchers.

"Sweetened drinks are about two-...

Hurricanes Raise Death Risk for Older Diabetics, Even Years Later

Hurricanes can harm anyone in their path, but new research suggests that seniors with diabetes face a 40% increased risk of dying within the first month after a storm hits.

It's not just the first month they have to worry about: The study also found seniors with diabetes still had a 6% higher risk of dying even up to 10 years later.

"We compared seniors with diabete...

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