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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

13 Nov

Heart Health and Cancer Risk

Heart attack survivors at increased risk of developing cancer.

Health News Results - 321

People Are Avoiding the ER During COVID-19 Crisis at Their Peril: Study

Visits to U.S. emergency departments are down by 42% compared to the same time last year, and that's not good news, researchers report.

Fears of contracting the new coronavirus while visiting the ER are keeping people away, experts say.

But hesitating to seek help can be a fatal mistake.

So, "wider access is needed to health messages that reinforce the importa...

AHA News: After Saving Her Husband With CPR, She Gave Birth to Their Son

Nearly ready to deliver her first child, Ashley Goette woke up at 5 a.m. to go to the bathroom and nudged her husband, who seemed to be snoring. Andrew made a scary, gargling sound, so Ashley ran to get his asthma inhaler.

When his only response was gasping for air, Ashley called 911, telling the operator she thought she needed to do CPR.

After a few questions, the dispatcher de...

Prescriptions for Discredited COVID Drugs Surged 2,000% After Trump's Support

A new study finds that prescriptions rose sharply for two anti-malarial drugs that President Donald Trump claimed could help prevent or treat COVID-19.

This happened despite the fact that multiple studies found the medicines might only bring harm to patients with coronavirus illness.

The study, conducted by researchers at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital in Bo...

AHA News: Altitude? Exhaustion? Then, She Remembered the Elizabeth Banks Video

On the final morning of a family camping trip, Stacey Bailey woke up and started cleaning. After a difficult night caring for her sick granddaughter, Bailey hauled a pile of vomit-soiled sheets and towels to the campground showers.

Along the way, she felt nauseous and unusually exhausted.

"Maybe it's the altitude or I'm out of shape," she thought.

As she hung the wet lin...

After Heart Attack, Home Care Can Prevent a Return to Hospital

Receiving home health care reduces heart attack survivors' risk of hospital readmission after discharge, a new study finds.

In the United States, only a small percentage of heart attack survivors receive home care such as nursing and physical therapy, according to study authors.

The findings were presented recently at a virtual American Heart Association meeting. Research p...

Heart Attack Cases at ERs Fall by Half – Are COVID Fears to Blame?

U.S. emergency rooms are seeing about half as many heart attack patients as usual -- and researchers suspect the new coronavirus is the reason why.

It's not that fewer people are having heart attacks, doctors say. Rather, it's fear of getting COVID-19 keeping people from hospitals.

And the consequences can be deadly.

"I'm certainly not convinced that the true rat...

Women Less Likely to Get Standard Heart Medications

It's a myth that heart attacks are a "man's disease." Yet a new research review confirms that women remain less likely than men to get medications routinely recommended for preventing heart trouble and strokes.

Researchers found that across 43 international studies, a general pattern emerged: Women with risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely than men to be prescrib...

Lasting Spikes in Blood Pressure While Exercising Could Be Unhealthy Sign

Middle-aged men and women who develop high blood pressure while performing even moderate exercise may be at higher risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

"The way our blood pressure changes during and after exercise provides important information on whether we will develop disease in the future," researcher Vanessa Xanthakis, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University...

Trump Taking Drug Discredited as Safe or Effective Against Coronavirus

Despite numerous studies suggesting that certain drugs touted by President Donald Trump as "game changers" against coronavirus are actually useless and even harmful, Trump on Monday claimed he has been taking one of them for more than a week.

Trump said he has been taking the drug hydroxychloroquine for about a week and a half in an effort to help prevent infection or illness with SAR...

Poor Americans Likely to Miss Preventive Heart Screenings: Study

Low-income Americans are much less likely to be screened for heart disease or to receive counseling about controlling risk factors, a new study finds.

Heart health screenings -- such as regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks -- and counseling to improve diet, increase exercise or quit smoking play important roles in reducing heart disease risk.

Income has long been as...

Tough Childhoods Are Tough on Adult Hearts: Study

Adults who had rough childhoods have higher odds for heart disease.

That's the conclusion from a look at more than 3,600 people who were followed from the mid-1980s through 2018. Researchers found that those who experienced the most trauma, abuse, neglect and family dysfunction in childhood were 50% more likely to have had a heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in their 50...

Key Areas of the Brain Triggered in Recent Heart Attack Survivors

People who've recently had a heart attack show increased activity in the area of the brain involved in stress and emotions. And this is associated with elevated inflammation in arteries, a small, preliminary study finds.

"The results of this study advance our understanding of the interconnections among the brain, bone marrow and blood vessels," said study lead author Dr. Dong Oh Kang,...

Having Heart Symptoms? Don't Delay Care During Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic shouldn't stop people with heart problems from seeking medical care, experts say.

"Either call your doctor or come to the emergency department. Don't take chances with heart disease," said Dr. Sam Torbati, co-director of the emergency department at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

"We are very concerned that fears over COVID-19 is resulti...

Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests On the Rise During COVID-19 Crisis

Stress placed on the heart by COVID-19, a hesitancy by people to call 911, and even reluctance on the part of bystanders to perform CPR may be boosting rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, a new report finds.

The data comes from four provinces in northern Italy, a region that was hit very hard and very early by the coronavirus pandemic.

The researchers said that between ...

During Coronavirus Pandemic, Don't Ignore Symptoms of Heart Attack, Stroke

Fewer heart attack and stroke patients are seeking medical care since the coronavirus pandemic began and doctors are wondering why.

It's possible that during the pandemic, patients are ignoring symptoms that would otherwise worry them, doctors from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles suggest.

While investigators are trying to figure out what's happening, Dr. Patrick Lyden, a profe...

Cardiac Rehab Boosts Quality of Life After Heart Attack: Study

Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve heart attack survivors' quality of life, especially if they get lots of exercise, a new British study finds.

A heart attack can reduce quality of life due to struggles with mobility and self-care, as well as daily leisure and work activities.

Many heart attack survivors take part in cardiac rehab, which emphasizes exercise, quitting sm...

It Looks Like a Classic Heart Attack, But in COVID-19 Patients Other Issues May Be at Play

Eighteen patients with severe COVID-19 treated at a New York City hospital showed the classic signs of a heart attack on their electrocardiograms.

But a closer look at each case revealed that more than half of these patients didn't have a blockage in a major artery, the typical trigger of a heart attack. Thirteen of the 18 patients died of cardiac causes while in the hospital, said a ...

Is COVID-19 Causing More People to Suffer Heart Attacks at Home?

As U.S. hospitals deal with a continuing influx of COVID-19 patients, cardiologists are sounding an alarm: People may be ignoring heart attack symptoms in fear of going to the ER.

Since the coronavirus first hit the United States, doctors at a number of hospitals have noticed a pattern. Fewer patients are being treated for heart attacks at a time when -- if anything -- an increase wou...

Is It a Heart Attack or Just Gastric Bloating?

Severe bloating can put pressure on the heart and trigger heart monitor readings that can be mistaken for a heart attack, a new case report shows.

It involved a previously healthy 41-year-old man who was seen by doctors at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, after three weeks of lower extremity swelling, fatigue and shortness of breath.

He was taken to the ...

COVID-19 Can Trigger Serious Heart Injuries

As the toll of the COVID-19 pandemic grows, it is increasingly clear the infection is more than a lung disease. Many patients are developing heart complications, though the reasons are not fully understood.

People with heart disease or a history of stroke are at increased risk of the coronavirus infection, and of suffering more severe symptoms, according to the American Heart Associat...

Heart Patients Should Ask About Home-Based Cardiac Rehab

For those with heart problems, home-based rehab can take the place of hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation during the current coronavirus pandemic, heart experts say.

"Home-based cardiac rehab is a solution to help provide cardiac rehabilitation to patients with heart disease in a home setting, and to help them survive and thrive during this challenging period of time," said Dr. Ran...

AHA News: Cancer Survivor Feared Recurrence, But This Time It Was His Heart

Doug Cobb popped a couple antacid pills to calm the heartburn he'd been experiencing on and off for weeks. The 60-year-old considered he might have a stomach problem, but waved it off, assuming the burning sensation came from something he'd eaten.

Cobb had another reason for not wanting to see a doctor. A two-time cancer survivor, he tamped down a nagging fear his body was failing hi...

Heart Patients Need to Be Wary of Coronavirus

People with high blood pressure and heart disease may be vulnerable to complications from COVID-19, heart experts say.

Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

Based on current knowledge, seniors "with coronary heart disease or high blood pressure may be more susceptible to the coronavirus and more likely to devel...

Preventing Repeat Heart Attack, Stroke More Important Than Ever: AHA

With the new coronavirus severely straining the U.S. health care system, experts are calling on heart attack and stroke survivors to take extra steps to reduce their risk of a repeat event.

The American Heart Association (AHA) said current information suggests that elderly people with heart disease or high blood pressure are more likely to be infected with the coronavirus and to devel...

Soaking in a Hot Bath Might Do Your Heart Good

One of the few pleasures left to Americans sequestered at home is a soak in a hot bath.

Now, research from Japan involving more than 30,000 adults suggests a daily bath might do more than cleanse and relax -- it might also help lower your odds for heart disease and stroke.

"We found that frequent tub bathing was significantly associated with a lower risk of hypertension, sug...

Weight-Loss Surgery May Cut Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Weight-loss surgery is associated with a significantly lower risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and death, a new study reveals.

The study included more than 7,400 severely obese people, average age 36, in Denmark who had not suffered a heart attack or stroke. Half of the participants had weight-loss ("bariatric") surgery and half did not (the "control" group).

Over ...

Turning to Tofu Might Help the Heart: Study

Eating tofu and other foods with high levels of isoflavones -- plant-based "phytoestrogens" -- could lower people's risk of heart disease, a new study suggests. The effect was especially strong in women.

"Other human trials and animal studies of isoflavones, tofu and cardiovascular risk markers have also indicated positive effects, so people with an elevated risk of developing heart d...

Music Helps Heal a Damaged Heart

People often turn to music to boost their mood or relieve stress. And new research suggests there may be science supporting that practice.

The study found that listening to 30 minutes of music a day eased chest pain and anxiety in people who had recently had a heart attack.

"Based on our findings, we believe music therapy can help all patients after a heart attack. It's al...

More Evidence That Ditching Red Meat Is Good for Your Heart

If you want a longer, healthier life, try replacing that steak with beans, vegetables or whole grains -- but preferably not a fast-food veggie burger.

That's according to two preliminary studies by Harvard researchers. They found that people who eat plenty of "high-quality" plant foods instead of red or processed meat have a lower risk of heart attack and tend to live longer.

<...

After Heart Attack, Following Doctor's Orders Greatly Boosts Survival

Heart attack survivors receive a laundry list of tasks from their doctors as they leave the hospital, all aimed at improving their heart health.

It would be understandable to look at the list with a raised eyebrow and ask just how important all of it is.

Vitally important, it turns out.

Heart patients who follow all of their doctor's recommendations have a much low...

Erratic Sleep Habits May Boost Risk of Heart Problems: Study

People with irregular sleep patterns may be at increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 2,000 Americans between 45 and 84 years of age who did not have heart disease. Participants wore a wrist device that monitored their sleep for seven days, including bedtime, sleep duration and wake time.

They were then followe...

Intense Exercise Can Trigger Heart Trouble in the Unprepared

For most people, aerobic exercise is great. However, high-intensity exercise like running in marathons and triathlons can pose heart risks for those who have inadequate training.

Sudden cardiac arrest, atrial fibrillation and heart attacks are among these risks, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

"Exercise is medicine, and ther...

At High Risk for Heart Disease? Strict Blood Pressure Control Should Help

If you're at high risk for heart disease, lowering your blood pressure below the standard target level may help extend your life, a new study suggests.

Specifically, a systolic blood pressure target of less than 120 mm Hg -- rather than the standard 140 mm Hg -- could give someone an extra six months to three years of life, depending on their age when they begin intensive blood pressu...

Years of Endurance Exercise May Change Heart Structure

Triathlons, rowing, mountaineering, cross-country skiing: Tough exercise like this done over decades appears to reshape the heart, new research shows.

In older adults, long-term endurance exercise seems tied to an enlargement of the aorta -- the large artery that carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body. But whether that change is beneficial or harmful remains u...

Your Best Bet Against Heart Attack, Stroke? Lower Blood Pressure

Millions of Americans with high blood pressure are at risk of heart attack and stroke, but just a few changes might cut that risk.

"In February, American Heart Month, we encourage all Americans to take control of their heart health by better understanding and monitoring their blood pressure levels and making healthy lifestyle changes that can significantly reduce their risk of serious...

Is High Blood Pressure in First Pregnancy a Harbinger of Heart Trouble?

Having high blood pressure in a first pregnancy quadruples a woman's risk of heart attack or death from heart disease, a new study finds.

About 2% to 8% of pregnant women with previously normal blood pressure develop a condition called preeclampsia, which includes high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

In this study, Rutgers University ...

Women Patients Still Missing in Heart Research

Women remain underrepresented in heart disease research, even though it's the leading cause of death among women worldwide, researchers say.

Women accounted for less than 40% of all people enrolled in cardiovascular clinical trials from 2010 through 2017, according to a study published Feb. 17 in the journal Circulation.

"One woman dies from cardiovascular disease...

Radiation Treatment Is Hard on the Heart

Radiation therapy that targets cancers in the chest area can tax the heart and trigger high levels of fatigue, breathing problems and a reduced ability to exercise, a new study suggests.

However, doing more physical activity before undergoing radiation therapy may help reduce these problems, the researchers added.

"This study suggests that when a patient is treated wi...

Common Drugs Might Help Prevent Death From a 'Broken Heart'

When someone close to you dies, grief can literally break your heart, but two common medicines may help prevent a heart attack.

"While almost everyone loses someone they love during their lifetime and grief is a natural reaction, this stressful time can be associated with an increased risk of heart attack," said Dr. Geoffrey Tofler, a professor of preventive cardiology at the Univers...

AHA News: Darlene Love Reveals Heart Attack Details - and Celebrates Survival

A year after becoming a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Darlene Love woke up with a terrible headache and stomachache hours before a performance on the Jersey Shore.

Love refused to cancel. Aided by some aspirin her husband insisted she chew, she made it through the 90-minute concert, even posing for pictures and signing autographs afterward.

Only later did she...

Wide Variations Found in 'Normal' Resting Heart Rate

A "normal" resting heart rate can vary significantly among individuals, a new study finds.

Your heart rate, or pulse, is how many times your heart beats per minute.

One person's normal daily resting heart rate can differ by up to 70 beats per minute from another person's normal rate, said Giorgio Quer, of Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and coll...

2 in 3 Americans Unaware That Heart Disease Is Leading Killer of Women

More than two-thirds of Americans don't know that heart disease is the leading cause of death among U.S. women, a new survey reveals.

Overall, 68% of respondents weren't aware that heart disease is the top killer of women, but the rate was much higher (80%) among millennials.

A large number of respondents mistakenly believed breast cancer is the main cause of death i...

Meat Still Isn't Healthy, Study Confirms

After a weekend of football-shaped pigs-in-a-blanket, you probably don't want to hear that the latest study on red and processed meat found that these foods boost your risk of heart and blood vessel disease.

The study also found that meat ups your risk of premature death.

"Consume red and processed meats in moderation because even two servings or more a week are associated...

One Egg Per Day Is Heart-Healthy, After All

It's no yolk: Americans for decades have gotten dietary whiplash from the back-and-forth science on whether eggs are good for them.

But a major new study will have many egg-lovers relieved: You can enjoy an egg a day without having to worry about your heart.

"Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascu...

Even Low Levels of Air Pollution Add to Risk of Cardiac Arrest

All it takes is short-term exposure to fine-particle air pollution from cars and bushfires to increase the risk of cardiac arrest, a new study warns.

The findings underscore the need for tighter worldwide limits on so-called PM2.5 air pollution and development of cleaner energy sources, according to the authors.

"As no boundary exists in air quality among countries, a global...

Blood Pressure Dips Upon Standing Might Not Be as Dangerous as Thought

A common condition called "orthostatic hypotension" -- a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up -- has long been tied to the potential for dangerous falls in older people.

But a new study suggests that doctors who manage blood pressure in older patients shouldn't worry that their treatments are more hazardous for folks with the condition.

It "was not associated with ...

AHA News: High School Basketball Player Saved by CPR Helps Win Championship

When 17-year-old Ben Blankenhorn received his CPR certification as part of his lifeguard training, the lessons carried added resonance.

Just 10 months earlier, Blankenhorn had been saved by CPR.

The morning of Aug. 22, 2017, he woke up about 5:30 a.m. He drove to San Marcos High School near his home in Santa Barbara, Calif., and warmed up with some running drills on the tr...

Only 1 in 4 Older Cardiac Patients Get Rehab Therapy

Cardiac rehabilitation is known to help people recover after a heart attack or heart surgery, but a new study shows only one-quarter of eligible Medicare patients actually use it.

Which patients are most likely to pass on rehab? Women, those aged 85 and older, blacks, Hispanics and those who live in the Southeast and Appalachia, researchers found.

It gets worse: Of those who...

'Yo-Yo' Blood Pressure Numbers in Youth a Bad Sign for Health Later

If your blood pressure numbers swing from low to high and back again in your 20s, that could bode ill for heart health in middle age, new research shows.

In fact, every 4 mm Hg spike in systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a reading -- during young adulthood was tied to a 15% higher risk for heart disease in midlife, the research team found.

Study lead author Dr...

Don't Want a 2nd Heart Attack? Lose the Belly Fat

For heart attack survivors, a fat belly could mean another one is likely, a new study suggests.

Earlier studies have shown that abdominal obesity puts people at risk for their first heart attack. This new study shows it also ups the odds for a second one, researchers say.

"Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk ...

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