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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

Health News Results - 342

Your Best Bet Against Heart Attack, Stroke? Lower Blood Pressure

Millions of Americans with high blood pressure are at risk of heart attack and stroke, but just a few changes might cut that risk.

"In February, American Heart Month, we encourage all Americans to take control of their heart health by better understanding and monitoring their blood pressure levels and making healthy lifestyle changes that can significantly reduce their risk of serious...

Is High Blood Pressure in First Pregnancy a Harbinger of Heart Trouble?

Having high blood pressure in a first pregnancy quadruples a woman's risk of heart attack or death from heart disease, a new study finds.

About 2% to 8% of pregnant women with previously normal blood pressure develop a condition called preeclampsia, which includes high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

In this study, Rutgers University ...

Women Patients Still Missing in Heart Research

Women remain underrepresented in heart disease research, even though it's the leading cause of death among women worldwide, researchers say.

Women accounted for less than 40% of all people enrolled in cardiovascular clinical trials from 2010 through 2017, according to a study published Feb. 17 in the journal Circulation.

"One woman dies from cardiovascular disease...

Radiation Treatment Is Hard on the Heart

Radiation therapy that targets cancers in the chest area can tax the heart and trigger high levels of fatigue, breathing problems and a reduced ability to exercise, a new study suggests.

However, doing more physical activity before undergoing radiation therapy may help reduce these problems, the researchers added.

"This study suggests that when a patient is treated wi...

Common Drugs Might Help Prevent Death From a 'Broken Heart'

When someone close to you dies, grief can literally break your heart, but two common medicines may help prevent a heart attack.

"While almost everyone loses someone they love during their lifetime and grief is a natural reaction, this stressful time can be associated with an increased risk of heart attack," said Dr. Geoffrey Tofler, a professor of preventive cardiology at the Univers...

AHA News: Darlene Love Reveals Heart Attack Details – and Celebrates Survival

A year after becoming a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Darlene Love woke up with a terrible headache and stomachache hours before a performance on the Jersey Shore.

Love refused to cancel. Aided by some aspirin her husband insisted she chew, she made it through the 90-minute concert, even posing for pictures and signing autographs afterward.

Only later did she...

Wide Variations Found in 'Normal' Resting Heart Rate

A "normal" resting heart rate can vary significantly among individuals, a new study finds.

Your heart rate, or pulse, is how many times your heart beats per minute.

One person's normal daily resting heart rate can differ by up to 70 beats per minute from another person's normal rate, said Giorgio Quer, of Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and coll...

2 in 3 Americans Unaware That Heart Disease Is Leading Killer of Women

More than two-thirds of Americans don't know that heart disease is the leading cause of death among U.S. women, a new survey reveals.

Overall, 68% of respondents weren't aware that heart disease is the top killer of women, but the rate was much higher (80%) among millennials.

A large number of respondents mistakenly believed breast cancer is the main cause of death i...

Meat Still Isn't Healthy, Study Confirms

After a weekend of football-shaped pigs-in-a-blanket, you probably don't want to hear that the latest study on red and processed meat found that these foods boost your risk of heart and blood vessel disease.

The study also found that meat ups your risk of premature death.

"Consume red and processed meats in moderation because even two servings or more a week are associated...

One Egg Per Day Is Heart-Healthy, After All

It's no yolk: Americans for decades have gotten dietary whiplash from the back-and-forth science on whether eggs are good for them.

But a major new study will have many egg-lovers relieved: You can enjoy an egg a day without having to worry about your heart.

"Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascu...

Even Low Levels of Air Pollution Add to Risk of Cardiac Arrest

All it takes is short-term exposure to fine-particle air pollution from cars and bushfires to increase the risk of cardiac arrest, a new study warns.

The findings underscore the need for tighter worldwide limits on so-called PM2.5 air pollution and development of cleaner energy sources, according to the authors.

"As no boundary exists in air quality among countries, a global...

Blood Pressure Dips Upon Standing Might Not Be as Dangerous as Thought

A common condition called "orthostatic hypotension" -- a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up -- has long been tied to the potential for dangerous falls in older people.

But a new study suggests that doctors who manage blood pressure in older patients shouldn't worry that their treatments are more hazardous for folks with the condition.

It "was not associated with ...

AHA News: High School Basketball Player Saved by CPR Helps Win Championship

When 17-year-old Ben Blankenhorn received his CPR certification as part of his lifeguard training, the lessons carried added resonance.

Just 10 months earlier, Blankenhorn had been saved by CPR.

The morning of Aug. 22, 2017, he woke up about 5:30 a.m. He drove to San Marcos High School near his home in Santa Barbara, Calif., and warmed up with some running drills on the tr...

Only 1 in 4 Older Cardiac Patients Get Rehab Therapy

Cardiac rehabilitation is known to help people recover after a heart attack or heart surgery, but a new study shows only one-quarter of eligible Medicare patients actually use it.

Which patients are most likely to pass on rehab? Women, those aged 85 and older, blacks, Hispanics and those who live in the Southeast and Appalachia, researchers found.

It gets worse: Of those who...

'Yo-Yo' Blood Pressure Numbers in Youth a Bad Sign for Health Later

If your blood pressure numbers swing from low to high and back again in your 20s, that could bode ill for heart health in middle age, new research shows.

In fact, every 4 mm Hg spike in systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a reading -- during young adulthood was tied to a 15% higher risk for heart disease in midlife, the research team found.

Study lead author Dr...

Don't Want a 2nd Heart Attack? Lose the Belly Fat

For heart attack survivors, a fat belly could mean another one is likely, a new study suggests.

Earlier studies have shown that abdominal obesity puts people at risk for their first heart attack. This new study shows it also ups the odds for a second one, researchers say.

"Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk ...

Millions of Americans With Heart Disease Use Pot, Bringing Potential Harm

Over 2 million Americans with heart disease have used marijuana, despite evidence that it might be harmful to them, a new research review finds.

The report, published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, comes at a time when many states are legalizing medicinal or recreational marijuana use. And, some studies suggest, a growing number of Am...

Women's Blood Pressure Rises Earlier, Faster Than Men's

Popular media often portrays heart disease as a man's problem, but new research suggests that women's blood vessels actually age faster than men's do.

The new study found that blood pressure started increasing in women as early as the third decade of life, and it continued to rise higher than blood pressure in men throughout the life span.

The researchers said that this...

'Burnout' Could Raise Your Odds for A-fib

Feeling exhausted, with too few hours in the day to do what needs to be done?

Be careful of burnout -- especially after a new study finds it can raise your risk for the dangerous irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.

"A-fib" -- long tied to higher odds for heart attack and stroke -- is the most common form of heart arrhythmia. It's estimated that 10 million peopl...

AHA News: Nurse Training for Triathlon Had Her Heart Stopped Mid-Swim

When Alicia Bravo saw the EMS service in her childhood hometown was holding a 5K race to raise money for a mechanical chest compression system, she signed up right away.

As an ER nurse, Bravo knew the importance of quality CPR. She also recognized the challenges faced by volunteer-fueled rural emergency services.

Bravo ran the 2016 race in Cambridge, Wisconsin, and won her...

Want a Long, Healthy Old Age? A Healthy Middle Age Helps

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

New Heart Attack Treatment Shows Promise in Pig Study

A new compound might help stem the damage of a heart attack, research in animals suggests.

Giving recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-AB (rhPDGF-AB) to pigs lessened the effect of heart scarring, helped form new blood vessels and reduced the rates of heart arrhythmias, heart failure and sudden cardiac death, researchers found.

"This is an entirely new approach,...

AHA News: 32-Year-Old Mom Faces 'Widow Maker'

Ever since Ashli Stewart was a kid, people have told her that she's old at heart.

Raised by a single mother, Stewart often made dinner and helped her little brother with his homework. Today, as a mother of three and an executive assistant for a company in Bakersfield, California, she still considers herself a "fixer" of other people's problems.

"I'm just wired that way," S...

Do Your Heart a Favor: Bike, Walk to Work

Leave your car in the garage if you can: A new study suggests that walking or biking to work could cut your risk of a heart attack.

The researchers analyzed 2011 data from 43 million working adults in England and found that 11.4% were active commuters, with 8.6% walking to work and 2.8% cycling to work.

In areas where walking or cyclin...

A Medical Insight in Michelangelo's David, 'Hiding in Plain Sight'

Michelangelo's David is perhaps the world's most famous statue, gazed upon by millions over centuries.

And yet it's only this year that an American doctor has spotted an anatomical insight made by the artist -- one that's passed without notice on David for more than 500 years.

In the vast majority of sculptures, and in the everyday physiology of living people, the jugular ve...

Heart Tissue May Be Harmed by Heavy Drinking: Study

Heavy drinking may damage heart tissue, researchers warn.

Previous studies have shown that heavy drinking increases the risk of heart failure, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and heart rhythm disorders, but there has been little study into why it poses such a risk to heart health.

In this study, researchers analyzed three blood indicators of heart damage in more th...

Lots of Overtime Could Send Your Blood Pressure Soaring

Long hours spent working will do no favors for your blood pressure, a new Canadian study suggests.

The five-year study tracked the working hours and blood pressure readings of 3,500 white-collar workers at three public institutions in the province of Quebec.

Compared to those who worked less than 35 hours a week, those who worked 49 or more hours each week had a 70% high...

Do You Know the 5 Symptoms of a Heart Attack? Many Don't

Time is of the essence when you're having a heart attack.

But one in five Americans can't name the three most common symptoms of a heart attack, making it more likely they won't promptly respond to the life-threatening health crisis, a new study reports.

"More than 20% were unaware of the common symptoms of a heart attack," said senior researcher Dr. Khurram Nasir, a pre...

Heart Risks in Your Genes? Be Sure to Get Your Zzzs

Good sleep patterns can help reduce your risk of heart disease or stroke, even if you're at high genetic risk, new research shows.

In fact, the study of several hundred thousand people found that having a "healthy sleep score" of 5 (on a scale of 0 to 5) appeared to reduce a person's odds for heart disease and stroke by about a third.

So, if better sleep does result in a hea...

Black Patients May Not Gain Heart Benefit From Low-Dose Aspirin

The daily use of low-dose aspirin against heart disease may have taken another knock.

New research shows that the practice may not provide black Americans with any lowering of their heart attack risk.

Researchers analyzed 11 years of data from more than 65,000 people, ages 40-79, living in the American Southeast. More than two-thirds of the participants were black, and about...

Is Pot Use a Heart Risk After Surgery?

Heavy pot users are nearly two times more likely to have a heart attack after common types of surgeries as those who don't use the drug, a new study shows.

"While cannabis is often purported as being safe or benign, we don't fully understand the health implications of this drug, particularly in heavy users," said study author Dr. Karim Ladha, a clinician-scientist at the Li Ka Shing K...

Ski Your Way to a Healthier Aging Brain

Cross-country skiing may be good for your brain, a new study suggests.

Previous research found that participants of the Vasaloppet, a popular long-distance, cross-country skiing race in Sweden, have a lower risk of heart attack, but potential brain benefits have been unclear.

This new research compared the brain health of about 200,000 who took part in the Vasaloppet between...

Especially in the Young, Cholesterol Is No Friend to the Heart

Rising levels of cholesterol among young adults is strongly tied to long-term odds for the number one killer, heart disease, a new study finds.

The new global study involved data on more than 400,000 people from 38 different trials. Their health was tracked for an average of more than 13 years, but some were followed for up to 43 years.

The resear...

AHA News: Vegan Diet May Decrease Heart Disease, Stroke Risk in African Americans

Following a vegan diet for five weeks may decrease risk factors for heart disease, new research shows.

The study included 50 African Americans who were asked to eat only prepared meals delivered to their homes. A cardiovascular risk calculator was used to assess their risk of heart attack or stroke over the next 10 years. For 36 participants who had pre- and post-diet risk scores, th...

Heart Attack at 44 Helped Her Realize Diabetes' Dangers

Christina Herrera was 44 years old when she felt the symptoms of a heart attack.

"I was sweating, having heart palpitations and out of breath," the high school teacher said. "My school nurse said, 'I have to call an ambulance for you,' and I said I'd go later. I had to get back to my class. She said, 'You have to go now.'"

It's a good thing Herrera listened to her.

...

Heart Attack or Not? Apple Watch Might Give the Answer

A doctor armed with your Apple Watch might be able to tell if you're suffering from a heart attack, researchers report.

A physician should be able to gather enough heart rhythm data by placing the watch's sensors on different parts of your body, to judge whether a person is in the middle of a heart attack, the study found.

"Any Apple Watch series 4 and 5 can be used," said r...

Expensive Device Used in Heart Surgeries Might Pose Dangers: Study

A pricey high-tech pump that maintains blood flow during heart procedures could be more dangerous to patients than its low-tech predecessor, a pair of new studies finds.

The Impella device is associated with an increased risk of death, bleeding and stroke among patients undergoing angioplasty to re-open clogged arteries, two separate research teams concluded in presentations Sunday at...

Gene Test Might Someday Gauge Your Cardiac Arrest Risk

Sudden cardiac death is terrifying because it's exactly that -- one minute you're fine and the next you're facing death, with no warning and no prior symptoms.

Now, new research shows the secret to who's at risk for cardiac arrest and who isn't could lie in people's genes. And a gene test might someday help predict who's most endangered, according to a study presented this weekend at ...

Study Casts Doubt on Angioplasty, Bypass for Many Heart Patients

Bypass operations, angioplasty and the placement of artery-opening stents: For decades, millions of Americans have undergone these expensive, invasive procedures to help treat clogged vessels.

However, the results of a large and long-awaited clinical trial suggests that, in most cases, these procedures may not have provided any benefit over medications and lifestyle changes.

<...

Cheap, Older Gout Drug Could Be a Lifesaver After Heart Attack

A cheap drug that's been around for centuries as a gout treatment might also shield heart attack survivors from future heart crises, new trial results show.

The drug, colchicine, is derived from a plant called the autumn crocus, researchers explained Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association, in Philadelphia.

In the new trial, colchicine reduced by as ...

Too Few Heart Patients Getting Good Results From Medicines Alone

A rigorous, new international study finds that, despite doctors' best efforts, many heart patients given standard drugs aren't meeting goals to lower their cholesterol and blood pressure levels.

The study involved nearly 4,000 patients, averaging 64 years of age, treated at centers around the world.

The researchers found that, one year into treatment, nearly half (48%) o...

Cancer Risk May Rise After Heart Attack

Here's some worrisome news for folks who manage to survive a heart attack: New research suggests they might be far more vulnerable to developing cancer down the road.

People who suffered a heart health scare -- a heart attack, heart failure or a dangerously erratic heart rhythm -- had a more than sevenfold increased risk for subsequently developing cancer, compared to those with healt...

AHA News: Millions Unaware of Common Heart Attack Symptoms

Millions of Americans don't know any heart attack symptoms or how to best respond to them, according to a new study that said certain socioeconomic groups are particularly at risk.

About 805,000 Americans have a heart attack each year, and about 15% of them die from it. Because early intervention is so critical, health officials have spent decades trying to improve public knowled...

Some Jobs Are Better for Women's Hearts Than Others

Could your chosen profession determine the health of your heart?

It could certainly have an influence, new research suggests.

Scientists analyzed data from more than 65,000 postmenopausal women in the United States and found that several jobs were associated with poor heart health.

Compared to women with other jobs, the risk of poor heart health was: 36% higher...

Frequent Pot Smokers Face Twice the Odds for Stroke

Smoking pot doesn't do your heart or your brain any favors, a pair of new studies shows.

Frequent pot smokers are more than twice as likely to suffer a stroke compared with those who don't partake, the first study found.

They're also more likely to be hospitalized for a dangerously erratic heart rhythm, according to the second study.

Both studies are to be presente...

Evening Meals Could Harm the Female Heart, Study Shows

Late dinners and heavy evening snacking do no favors for women's hearts, a new study suggests.

Researchers at New York City's Columbia University found that those who ate more of their daily calories in the evening had a higher risk of heart disease.

One cardiologist who looked over the new findings wasn't surprised by the effect.

"The way metabolism, circadian rhy...

Heart Cells Change During Spaceflight

It sounds scary, but the changes are only temporary: Researchers report that heart cells grown in space showed altered gene expression.

But just 10 days after being returned to Earth, the heart cells returned to normal.

Once stem cells grew into heart cells aboard the International Space Station, their exposure to microgravity changed the expression of thousands of genes.

Sleepless Nights Could Raise Heart Risks

Sleep problems could increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and other heart and brain diseases, a new study suggests.

It included 487,200 people in China, average age 51, with no history of stroke or heart disease. They were asked if they had any of these problems three or more times a week: trouble falling asleep or staying asleep; waking up too early; or trouble staying focused...

Do You Take Biotin Supplements? They Could Affect Your Medical Tests

Biotin supplements, often taken to improve hair, skin and nails, can interfere with the results of some critical lab tests, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

The FDA is particularly concerned about biotin interference causing a falsely low result for troponin, which is key in diagnosing heart attack. The agency said in a statement that it continues to receive repor...

Weight-Loss Surgery Protects Heart Patients From Future Trouble

If you're an obese heart patient, weight-loss surgery might be good medicine for you.

New research suggests it significantly reduces the risk of heart failure and fatal heart attack in this vulnerable group.

"Our findings suggest, for the first time, that bariatric [weight-loss] surgery can prevent the development of systolic heart failure and remarkably reduce death from re...

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