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Results for search "Sensory Problems".

Health News Results - 18

Autism may involve nerves that control touch, pain and other sensations as well as the brain, a new study suggests.

"More than 70% of people with autism have differences in their sensory perception," said researcher Dr. Sung-Tsang Hsieh, an attending neurologist at National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei. "For some people, even a light touch can feel unbearable while others...

Like many other animals, people can move their ears to focus on a specific sound, researchers say.

However, this movement of ears is subtle and the ability to do it hasn't been known until now.

By measuring electrical signals in ear muscles as volunteers tried to detect sounds, researchers found that people make tiny, unconscious movements to aim their ears at a particular s...

The aftereffects of COVID-19 are numerous, and now British researchers report that many patients recovering from infection with the new coronavirus have lingering hearing problems.

For the study, 120 U.K. patients who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 took part in a phone survey.

When the patients were asked if they had any changes in their hearing, 13% said it was wor...

While a fever and cough have seemed to be the early warning signs of COVID-19, new research shows almost half of hospitalized patients experience a host of neurological problems.

In fact, headaches, dizziness, strokes, weakness, decreased alertness or other neurological symptoms can appear before the more commonly known symptoms of infection with the new coronavirus (known as S...

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, it's become clear that many people with the infection lose their sense of smell and taste. And doctors are concerned that some will never get back to normal.

At this point, it's hard to know how common the symptom is. First, there were anecdotal reports of COVID-19 patients who had lost their ability to smell or taste, said Dr. Nicholas Rowan,...

A sense of touch has been restored to a young man who lost it after being left paralyzed from the elbows down following a swimming accident nearly a decade ago.

How? By tapping into almost imperceptible neural signals that can remain even after spinal cord injury, and amplifying those signals to the point where a lost sense of touch can be regained.

The process was achieved ...

A new study adds to a growing pile of evidence that suggests losing your sense of smell and taste is an early sign of COVID-19.

While there has been anecdotal information about this link, these are the first empirical findings that make a strong connection, according to the researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

Other known symptoms of coronavirus infection ...

Here's a clue that you may have coronavirus that might surprise you: a loss of your sense of smell.

Groups representing ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists in Britain and the United States have issued guidances that a sudden loss of a person's sense of smell may be a sign of infection with the new coronavirus.

It's not a completely unexpected finding, since a temporary in...

Playing sports may improve the brain's ability to process sounds, a finding that could lead to new therapies for people who struggle with hearing, researchers report.

"No one would argue against the fact that sports lead to better physical fitness, but we don't always think of brain fitness and sports," said study senior author Nina Kraus. She's a professor of communication sciences a...

Even a mild concussion can temporarily affect your sense of smell and trigger longer-term anxiety problems, a new study finds.

It's been known that such problems could occur after a major concussion. But this study found it's also true for minor concussions caused by accidents such as falling off a bike with a helmet on, having a traffic fender-bender, falling on the ski slopes, or sl...

Java junkies can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee, and the more they drink, the better they can smell it, British researchers say.

It's a discovery with powerful implications for treating people addicted to substances with a distinct smell.

"The higher the caffeine use, the quicker a person recognized the odor of coffee," said study leader Lorenzo Stafford. He is an ol...

They say the nose knows, but can a loss of smell signal impending death?

Possibly, researchers say.

They discovered that a poor sense of smell was associated with a nearly 50% higher risk of death within the next decade for adults older than 70.

While the study didn't prove cause and effect, that association is enough to make some experts wonder whether seniors...

Researchers have long wondered why blind people seem to have a sharpened sense of hearing. Now a Seattle team has pinpointed specific brain adaptations that occur in folks without sight.

"There's this idea that blind people are good at auditory tasks, because they have to make their way in the world without visual information. We wanted to explore how this happens in the brain," said ...

Danish researchers have sniffed out a potential new weapon to fight armpit odor.

It's zinc oxide, or ZnO. The strategy was inspired by hospital wound care. Because putting zinc oxide on open surgical wounds reduces corynebacteria and the bad smell it creates, researchers thought it might also make an effective deodorant.

The study authors said their small, early trial with 3...

Could quitting tobacco involve something as simple as a pleasant scent?

New research suggests it's possible.

U.S. smoking rates have fallen over the past 50 years, but about 40 million Americans still smoke, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At least half of adult smokers report trying to quit in the past year, but half of those who ...

Don't blame a loss of taste on your mouth, new research suggests.

Instead, most people can thank their nose for the problem, the study authors said.

The research team at the Virginia Commonwealth University's Smell and Taste Disorders Center examined the records of 358 patients who were evaluated for a taste disorder or combined taste/smell disorder between 1980 and 2017.

With their keen sense of smell, dogs can track down bombs and drugs, but new research suggests they can also sniff out malaria in people.

If confirmed by further studies, canines might someday be used to help spot malaria early, when treatment is most effective.

The study included two dogs -- a Labrador retriever and a Labrador-Golden retriever -- that were trained to detect...

New research suggests there is no perfume a man loves more than the scent of a fertile woman.

Researchers in Switzerland determined that women who are the "fittest" for reproduction have a distinctive scent that makes them particularly appealing to men.

"Women with high estrogen and low progesterone levels are most attractive to men in an olfactory sense," said study leader ...