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09 Nov

Is It A Cold, The Flu Or COVID-19?

Experts looked at how you can tell the difference between these three illnesses.

06 Nov

Does Physical Work Help Protect Brain From Dementia?

Physical activity on the job may be very different than leisure-time movement, new study finds.

05 Nov

Getting A Flu Shot May Protect You Against Severe COVID-19

COVID-19 patients who skip the flu shot more than double their risk of being hospitalized, new study finds.

Metabolites' From Food Could Affect Your Stroke Risk

Steven Reinberg December 3, 2020

Metabolites' From Food Could Affect Your Stroke Risk

Levels of some small molecules called metabolites in the body may affect your risk of stroke, a new analysis suggests.

Metabolites come from the food people eat, and they cause chemical processes within the bodies and microbes. An analysis of previously published studies found that the levels of 10 of th... Full Page

CDC Shrinks COVID Quarantine Time, Advises Against Holiday Travel

Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter December 2, 2020

CDC Shrinks COVID Quarantine Time, Advises Against Holiday Travel

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention delivered some good news and some bad news on Wednesday: The recommended length of quarantine after exposure to the new coronavirus has been shortened, but Americans are again being asked to avoid any and all travel during the coming holiday season.

The new quarantine guidelines will allo... Full Page

Many Hospitalized COVID Patients Will Need Longer-Term Care at Home

Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter December 2, 2020

Many Hospitalized COVID Patients Will Need Longer-Term Care at Home

When COVID-19 patients go home from the hospital, their recovery is often far from over -- and many might benefit from home health care, a new study suggests.

At a time when U.S. COVID cases are surging and hospitals are running out of room, experts say home health care could serve a critical role by allowing some patients to have shorter ... Full Page

Relief for America's Unemployed Could Be Crucial for Health

Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter December 2, 2020

Relief for America's Unemployed Could Be Crucial for Health


Americans who lost their jobs this year due to the coronavirus pandemic have remained healthier and more secure thanks to expanded unemployment insurance, a new study reports.

Struggling folks who received benefits reported that they were less likely to go hungry, miss a rent or mortgage payment, delay needed... Full Page

AHA News: The Heart Health Risks of Being a Single Parent

American Heart Association News December 2, 2020

AHA News: The Heart Health Risks of Being a Single Parent

Nobody needs a study to tell them being a single parent is tough.

"This is a group of people who are kind of carrying the weight of the world on their shoulders, right?" said Dr. Natalie Stokes, a cardiology fellow at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "You're taking care of kids. You're trying to provide for your family."

... Full Page

Britain Approves Emergency Use of Pfizer's COVID Vaccine

Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters December 2, 2020

Britain Approves Emergency Use of Pfizer's COVID Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) – Britain became the first Western country to allow emergency use of a coronavirus vaccine on Wednesday, after approving Pfizer's candidate in the race to inoculate millions of people around the globe.

"Help is on its way with this vaccine -- and we can now say that with certainty, rather than wit... Full Page

Menopause Can Make Workplace Tougher for Women: Study

Robert Preidt December 2, 2020

Menopause Can Make Workplace Tougher for Women: Study

Menopause symptoms can interfere with women's jobs, Japanese researchers report.

For the study, the investigators looked at nearly 600 working women, aged 45 to 65, in Japan. Of those, 61% were postmenopausal.

Women with a higher number of menopause symptoms had poorer work performance, according to the authors of the study published... Full Page

Gay, Lesbian Adults Often Miss Out on Cholesterol Meds

Robert Preidt December 2, 2020

Gay, Lesbian Adults Often Miss Out on Cholesterol Meds

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adults are less likely to take cholesterol-lowering statins to prevent heart disease than heterosexual adults, even though they have a higher heart disease risk, according to a new study.

Researchers conducted an online survey of more than 1,500 Facebook users, aged 40 and older, and found that nearly one-t... Full Page

Take Care of Your Mental Health During Pandemic

Robert Preidt December 2, 2020

Take Care of Your Mental Health During Pandemic

It's crucial that you look after your mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, experts say.

"Historically, we know that pandemics and other public health crises, much like natural disasters, have a lasting impact," said Dr. Itai Danovitch, chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center... Full Page

Should Cancer Survivors Be Prioritized for COVID Vaccine?

Robert Preidt December 2, 2020

Should Cancer Survivors Be Prioritized for COVID Vaccine?

Cancer survivors have higher odds of dying from seasonal flu, suggesting they may also be at increased risk from COVID-19 and may need to be among the first in line for vaccination against both diseases.

Researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine analyzed medical data from more than 630,000 people in the United Kin... Full Page

Health Care Workers, Nursing Home Residents to Get First Vaccines: Panel

Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter December 1, 2020

Health Care Workers, Nursing Home Residents to Get First Vaccines: Panel

Health care workers and people in nursing homes should be at the front of the line for upcoming COVID-19 vaccines, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel recommended Tuesday.

The recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice (ACIP), if heeded, will steer the initial short supply of vaccines to ... Full Page

COVID-19 Can Damage Lungs So Badly That 'Only Hope' is Transplant

Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter December 1, 2020

COVID-19 Can Damage Lungs So Badly That 'Only Hope' is Transplant

Case studies and autopsy results are confirming that, in some cases, COVID-19 can cause such severe lung damage that patients require a lung transplant to survive.

In a new study, researchers in Chicago analyzed discarded tissue from COVID-19 patients who had lung transplants and from patients who died of the disease. They found that COVI... Full Page

AHA News: Food Insecurity Rates High Among People With Heart Disease

American Heart Association News December 1, 2020

AHA News: Food Insecurity Rates High Among People With Heart Disease

People with atherosclerosis, particularly those who earn a low income and have other socioeconomic disadvantages, are more likely to experience food insecurity than those without the condition, according to new research.

Researchers analyzed several socioeconomic factors from self-reported data for 190,113 U.S. adults. Among the 18,442 (8.... Full Page

Will Pot or CBD Make You a Worse Driver?

Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter December 1, 2020

Will Pot or CBD Make You a Worse Driver?


As marijuana laws relax and the popularity of CBD products explodes, more Americans may find themselves behind the wheel after taking either of these cannabis-linked substances.

Now, an on-the-road study found that the danger of driving after consuming a marijuana product varies depending on what the main ing... Full Page

Could Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?

Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter December 1, 2020

Could Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?


Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal "plaque" accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. In the new study, researchers found that among older a... Full Page

Need an IV or Stitches? Virtual Reality or Hypnosis Might Ease Pain

Steven Reinberg December 1, 2020

Need an IV or Stitches? Virtual Reality or Hypnosis Might Ease Pain

Virtual reality glasses or hypnosis can relieve pain and anxiety in people having short medical procedures, a new study finds.

For those getting an IV catheter or stitches to close a wound, for example, these distraction techniques reduce the need for painkillers, say researchers in Belgium.

The study is by Dr. E. Kubra Okur Kavak a... Full Page

COVID Hospitalizations in U.S. Hit Record High

Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters December 1, 2020

COVID Hospitalizations in U.S. Hit Record High

Yet another grim record for COVID-19 hospitalizations was set on Monday, as more than 96,000 patients battled severe cases of the virus in hospital wards across America.

Counts of new coronavirus infections and fatalities have slowed in the past few days, a common occurrence over holidays and weekends due to delays in testing and reporting... Full Page

Almost Half of Americans Worry About Surprise Medical Bills: Poll

Steven Reinberg December 1, 2020

Almost Half of Americans Worry About Surprise Medical Bills: Poll

Nearly half of Americans fear unexpected medical bills and 44% say they couldn't pay a $1,000 surprise bill, a new poll shows.

Those fears aren't unfounded. Among those with private health insurance, 68% have received unexpected medical bills and 33% couldn't pay them on time, while 23% said they haven't paid them yet.

Many Amer... Full Page

Eye Injury Reported From Germ-Killing UV Lamps

Robert Preidt December 1, 2020

Eye Injury Reported From Germ-Killing UV Lamps


Amid a pandemic, some people are buying so-called germicidal ultraviolet lamps to protect against the new coronavirus.

But new research finds that decision could backfire when it comes to eye health.

Doctors are reporting on several patients who used such devices to eliminate the virus from homes and offices and developed painful... Full Page

'Smell Training' Might Speed the Sense's Return After COVID

Steven Reinberg December 1, 2020

'Smell Training' Might Speed the Sense's Return After COVID

Special training may help COVID-19 patients regain their sense of smell after suffering parosmia, a new British study suggests.

Parosmia is a condition where people have strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling a lemon, for example, you may smell rotting cabbage, or chocolate may smell like gasoline. Parosmia has... Full Page

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